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Foothill: Black Student Union members voice concerns about SRO program

Students contend district did not follow up on their requests to disarm officers; PPD says carrying gun is a legal requirement

Black Student Union members at Foothill High School told the Weekly recently that they felt like the Pleasanton school district had ghosted them after listening to student concerns about armed school resource officers.

"We mainly all came to a good decision that the officers should leave their service weapon in their car, because the officer parks pretty much on campus, like, really close," said Aria Harris, a Foothill senior and BSU president. "(All of us) were saying how the officer having their service weapon with them kind of makes us uncomfortable ... but after the meeting, we never really heard back about what would possibly happen with that and if they wanted to consider that or not."

Harris was referring to a meeting on May 5 the BSU had with student services staff from the Pleasanton Unified School District. The meeting was part of a listening campaign meant to gather feedback from student focus groups such as the BSUs at both Foothill and Amador Valley high schools, as well as others.

Before getting that feedback from the students groups, the district surveyed about 400 students via Google Form email surveys -- all of which was compiled into a report for the Pleasanton school board during the same month.

The report was meant to update the Board of Trustees on how the school resource officer program was doing after the city approved a three-year contract memorandum of understanding with the district regarding the program.

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During the meeting with the district staff, BSU members voiced their uncomfortable feelings with school officers being armed and asked to open the discussion on alternatives such as leaving their gun in their patrol car, which Harris said is already parked on campus.

She made it clear that the members didn't have a problem with the officers being at the school, just that they were armed -- which a Pleasanton Police Department official told the Weekly is a requirement for officers on duty.

"An officer's belt has so many other options that they could use, other than a gun," Harris said. "I just think it's a little unnecessary, especially being around so many children, because you don't know what's gonna happen. Someone could reach for the officer's gun, and it could just be so bad."

She also said some BSU members raised the concern after learning about some recent police shootings where officers mistook their gun for a taser. A recent example of that can be seen with former Minnesota police officer Kimberly Potter who received a two-year sentence for accidentally shooting 20-year-old Daunte Wright instead of tasing him.

"We just thought that the risk isn't really worth ... the officer needing his weapon for a school shooter or something like that," Harris said.

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According to the SRO agreement with the school district and the city, officers are legally required to be equipped with a gun.

Pleasanton police Sgt. Marty Billdt told the Weekly that according to last year's MOU for the program, the officers "are not relieved of their official duties as a law enforcement officer."

He said that means the city has the ability to remove those officers from their assigned schools in the case of any serious emergency, which also means they would have to be fully prepared with all their tools -- including their guns.

"A handgun is just one of the many tools law enforcement officers carry," said Billdt, himself a former SRO in Pleasanton. "The SROs, although working in an educational setting, need to be prepared for any type of call at the school and/or in the city."

Still, when district staff came to their BSU meeting and listened to their concerns about officers being armed last spring, Harris said there was no follow up -- making her and other members feel like their concerns don't matter.

"The SRO issue is just part of even a larger issue, because we are (effectively) in a segregated school district and we have such a small Black and Latino population of students, that their voices are often overlooked in school decisions," said Jorie Pratt, an African American literature teacher and BSU adviser at Foothill.

According to Ed-Data, a website that partners with the California Department of Education to provide data on schools in California, 1.5% of the students enrolled in Pleasanton schools were Black and 10.1% were Hispanic or Latino.

"It definitely makes me feel like they just wanted to come and get our opinions about stuff, but didn't really want to do something with our opinions," Harris said. "Like, they just want to do it to act as though they cared and they really want to get our opinions, but in the end, they didn't really do anything about what we told them."

Kendra Kabiru, another senior and member of the BSU at Foothill, said she thinks not following through with their request makes her believe the district doesn't value the club's opinions.

"I think just because so many of us have seen so many horror stories with police officers in schools and stuff, it just kind of rubs us the wrong way that we voiced those concerns, and like nothing was done to kind of help us or anything like that," Kabiru said.

For the most part, district staff had good things to say about the program during the May 26 school board meeting, citing high praise from student, staff and community survey results.

Their data showed that the majority of respondents felt safer and more comfortable with a school resource officer present at each of the schools.

It wasn't until then-student trustee Saachi Bhayani asked why the report didn't include the BSUs' requests on their service weapons that the topic came up.

"When the board came to our (May 5) meeting, they seemed really concerned and how they really valued our opinions and stuff like that," Harris said. "They were taking notes and making sure everyone was heard and stuff like that. But after they came, nothing was done about it. No one reached out to let us know anything about it. The (May 26) board meeting happened. We weren't aware."

Patrick Gannon, director of communications at PUSD, told the Weekly that the district doesn't shy away from these conversations and will continue to look at engaging with students and communities on an annual basis. He also said the district encourages students to engage in these conversations, especially with the school board.

But Bhayani said the problem wasn't just that the district didn't follow through on the BSU requests. She was also upset at how the district surveyed students on this topic.

"Who was checking (their) school email; who's gonna fill out the Google Form?" Bhayani said. "Who's also gonna put trauma into the Google Form? I think that could be a better method of surveying that."

She also said not breaking up the survey to account for race and ethnicity was a problem because it doesn't show the data on how those communities are being impacted specifically.

"The survey that students, families and staff participated in last spring promised anonymity to support honest and open responses," Gannon told the Weekly. "In general, results are not broken out when respondent groups are small enough to be identifiable and thus risk inadvertently disclosing the identity of a student."

But Amara Miller, a sociology professor at the California State University, East Bay, told the Weekly that understanding why these communities of color are impacted more from even just the presence of a police officer is very important when trying to understand this complex issue.

"I think it's important for us as a society to put this in historical context," Miller said. "The origins of police forces in the United States are rooted in racism, not solely toward Black people but also to other racial groups like Asian Americans, Latinx populations and indigenous peoples."

Miller, who's areas of teaching and research focuses on cultural sociology, complex organizations and social movements, said that the history of how old police forces targeted and surveyed minority groups is rooted in all police institutions today.

She said that is why people of color, either in the public or even at schools, can be privy to become a target for any given officer -- and that, coupled with today's world of easily accessible video surveillance showing police brutality, can easily scare any student who falls into that racial category.

"Personally, I don't think police belong in any schools," Miller said. "It's not just because of the risks of police violence against students, which is always a risk even if it might be more rare. Police in schools can decrease feelings of trust among students and impact academic performance especially for students who are from groups that experience over policing."

She said that can include students of color, but also folks who identify as LGBTQ+, disabled populations and even religious minorities.

Sgt. Billdt said Pleasanton police officers do receive department training in implicit bias, de-escalation techniques and conflict resolutions and restorative justice.

But Miller argues it's not enough.

"The issue with just giving police more training is that they are always very short and inadequate on complex topics, and we can't guarantee that police take them seriously," Miller said. "I've known people who have gone in to do training with police officers who have been openly laughed off by those officers attending. That's not always the case, of course, but resistance to change from police is a real concern."

She did add, however, that while she does understand the safety aspect, given all of the recent school shootings, school districts should focus on preemptive solutions in addressing kids who might be dealing with issues at an early age.

"Resources that go to school police could be going to fund more counselors in our schools, teacher's salaries to ensure class sizes are small and they can form deeper connections with their students to better recognize when a student is in need, and programs like restorative/transformative justice approaches to deal with student discipline," Miller said.

Pratt echoed that statement and said that she would also prefer seeing more counselors rather than officers, "rather than a resource that is solely there to punish you or treat them like criminals."

"That's what I told the district in that survey, but who knows what was actually read or not," Pratt said.

Harris ultimately said that she just wishes there can be more discussion on the topic with the district, but made it clear that the district needs to do a better job at following up than last time.

Gannon told the Weekly that the district is looking forward to any future conversations with the police department and any student groups.

"We're fortunate that Pleasanton is a community where the police department is very proactive in engaging the community and families to build positive relationships -- this starts at the elementary level in our schools," Gannon said. "We are committed to ensuring students feel safe on campus, and look forward to conversations on how we can best serve our community in this regard."

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Foothill: Black Student Union members voice concerns about SRO program

Students contend district did not follow up on their requests to disarm officers; PPD says carrying gun is a legal requirement

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Nov 16, 2022, 9:51 pm

Black Student Union members at Foothill High School told the Weekly recently that they felt like the Pleasanton school district had ghosted them after listening to student concerns about armed school resource officers.

"We mainly all came to a good decision that the officers should leave their service weapon in their car, because the officer parks pretty much on campus, like, really close," said Aria Harris, a Foothill senior and BSU president. "(All of us) were saying how the officer having their service weapon with them kind of makes us uncomfortable ... but after the meeting, we never really heard back about what would possibly happen with that and if they wanted to consider that or not."

Harris was referring to a meeting on May 5 the BSU had with student services staff from the Pleasanton Unified School District. The meeting was part of a listening campaign meant to gather feedback from student focus groups such as the BSUs at both Foothill and Amador Valley high schools, as well as others.

Before getting that feedback from the students groups, the district surveyed about 400 students via Google Form email surveys -- all of which was compiled into a report for the Pleasanton school board during the same month.

The report was meant to update the Board of Trustees on how the school resource officer program was doing after the city approved a three-year contract memorandum of understanding with the district regarding the program.

During the meeting with the district staff, BSU members voiced their uncomfortable feelings with school officers being armed and asked to open the discussion on alternatives such as leaving their gun in their patrol car, which Harris said is already parked on campus.

She made it clear that the members didn't have a problem with the officers being at the school, just that they were armed -- which a Pleasanton Police Department official told the Weekly is a requirement for officers on duty.

"An officer's belt has so many other options that they could use, other than a gun," Harris said. "I just think it's a little unnecessary, especially being around so many children, because you don't know what's gonna happen. Someone could reach for the officer's gun, and it could just be so bad."

She also said some BSU members raised the concern after learning about some recent police shootings where officers mistook their gun for a taser. A recent example of that can be seen with former Minnesota police officer Kimberly Potter who received a two-year sentence for accidentally shooting 20-year-old Daunte Wright instead of tasing him.

"We just thought that the risk isn't really worth ... the officer needing his weapon for a school shooter or something like that," Harris said.

According to the SRO agreement with the school district and the city, officers are legally required to be equipped with a gun.

Pleasanton police Sgt. Marty Billdt told the Weekly that according to last year's MOU for the program, the officers "are not relieved of their official duties as a law enforcement officer."

He said that means the city has the ability to remove those officers from their assigned schools in the case of any serious emergency, which also means they would have to be fully prepared with all their tools -- including their guns.

"A handgun is just one of the many tools law enforcement officers carry," said Billdt, himself a former SRO in Pleasanton. "The SROs, although working in an educational setting, need to be prepared for any type of call at the school and/or in the city."

Still, when district staff came to their BSU meeting and listened to their concerns about officers being armed last spring, Harris said there was no follow up -- making her and other members feel like their concerns don't matter.

"The SRO issue is just part of even a larger issue, because we are (effectively) in a segregated school district and we have such a small Black and Latino population of students, that their voices are often overlooked in school decisions," said Jorie Pratt, an African American literature teacher and BSU adviser at Foothill.

According to Ed-Data, a website that partners with the California Department of Education to provide data on schools in California, 1.5% of the students enrolled in Pleasanton schools were Black and 10.1% were Hispanic or Latino.

"It definitely makes me feel like they just wanted to come and get our opinions about stuff, but didn't really want to do something with our opinions," Harris said. "Like, they just want to do it to act as though they cared and they really want to get our opinions, but in the end, they didn't really do anything about what we told them."

Kendra Kabiru, another senior and member of the BSU at Foothill, said she thinks not following through with their request makes her believe the district doesn't value the club's opinions.

"I think just because so many of us have seen so many horror stories with police officers in schools and stuff, it just kind of rubs us the wrong way that we voiced those concerns, and like nothing was done to kind of help us or anything like that," Kabiru said.

For the most part, district staff had good things to say about the program during the May 26 school board meeting, citing high praise from student, staff and community survey results.

Their data showed that the majority of respondents felt safer and more comfortable with a school resource officer present at each of the schools.

It wasn't until then-student trustee Saachi Bhayani asked why the report didn't include the BSUs' requests on their service weapons that the topic came up.

"When the board came to our (May 5) meeting, they seemed really concerned and how they really valued our opinions and stuff like that," Harris said. "They were taking notes and making sure everyone was heard and stuff like that. But after they came, nothing was done about it. No one reached out to let us know anything about it. The (May 26) board meeting happened. We weren't aware."

Patrick Gannon, director of communications at PUSD, told the Weekly that the district doesn't shy away from these conversations and will continue to look at engaging with students and communities on an annual basis. He also said the district encourages students to engage in these conversations, especially with the school board.

But Bhayani said the problem wasn't just that the district didn't follow through on the BSU requests. She was also upset at how the district surveyed students on this topic.

"Who was checking (their) school email; who's gonna fill out the Google Form?" Bhayani said. "Who's also gonna put trauma into the Google Form? I think that could be a better method of surveying that."

She also said not breaking up the survey to account for race and ethnicity was a problem because it doesn't show the data on how those communities are being impacted specifically.

"The survey that students, families and staff participated in last spring promised anonymity to support honest and open responses," Gannon told the Weekly. "In general, results are not broken out when respondent groups are small enough to be identifiable and thus risk inadvertently disclosing the identity of a student."

But Amara Miller, a sociology professor at the California State University, East Bay, told the Weekly that understanding why these communities of color are impacted more from even just the presence of a police officer is very important when trying to understand this complex issue.

"I think it's important for us as a society to put this in historical context," Miller said. "The origins of police forces in the United States are rooted in racism, not solely toward Black people but also to other racial groups like Asian Americans, Latinx populations and indigenous peoples."

Miller, who's areas of teaching and research focuses on cultural sociology, complex organizations and social movements, said that the history of how old police forces targeted and surveyed minority groups is rooted in all police institutions today.

She said that is why people of color, either in the public or even at schools, can be privy to become a target for any given officer -- and that, coupled with today's world of easily accessible video surveillance showing police brutality, can easily scare any student who falls into that racial category.

"Personally, I don't think police belong in any schools," Miller said. "It's not just because of the risks of police violence against students, which is always a risk even if it might be more rare. Police in schools can decrease feelings of trust among students and impact academic performance especially for students who are from groups that experience over policing."

She said that can include students of color, but also folks who identify as LGBTQ+, disabled populations and even religious minorities.

Sgt. Billdt said Pleasanton police officers do receive department training in implicit bias, de-escalation techniques and conflict resolutions and restorative justice.

But Miller argues it's not enough.

"The issue with just giving police more training is that they are always very short and inadequate on complex topics, and we can't guarantee that police take them seriously," Miller said. "I've known people who have gone in to do training with police officers who have been openly laughed off by those officers attending. That's not always the case, of course, but resistance to change from police is a real concern."

She did add, however, that while she does understand the safety aspect, given all of the recent school shootings, school districts should focus on preemptive solutions in addressing kids who might be dealing with issues at an early age.

"Resources that go to school police could be going to fund more counselors in our schools, teacher's salaries to ensure class sizes are small and they can form deeper connections with their students to better recognize when a student is in need, and programs like restorative/transformative justice approaches to deal with student discipline," Miller said.

Pratt echoed that statement and said that she would also prefer seeing more counselors rather than officers, "rather than a resource that is solely there to punish you or treat them like criminals."

"That's what I told the district in that survey, but who knows what was actually read or not," Pratt said.

Harris ultimately said that she just wishes there can be more discussion on the topic with the district, but made it clear that the district needs to do a better job at following up than last time.

Gannon told the Weekly that the district is looking forward to any future conversations with the police department and any student groups.

"We're fortunate that Pleasanton is a community where the police department is very proactive in engaging the community and families to build positive relationships -- this starts at the elementary level in our schools," Gannon said. "We are committed to ensuring students feel safe on campus, and look forward to conversations on how we can best serve our community in this regard."

Comments

Swagu
Registered user
Bridle Creek
on Nov 17, 2022 at 1:36 pm
Swagu, Bridle Creek
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2022 at 1:36 pm

Having an armed trained officer on campus scares students? Looks like ppl cry no matter what.


Carl
Registered user
Stoneridge
on Nov 17, 2022 at 5:03 pm
Carl, Stoneridge
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2022 at 5:03 pm

Wow, we now have high school students telling the district and the police department how they should do their jobs so they can feel good. Just because there is a meeting by the district with what I assume is a small group of students that are demanding something doesn’t mean it will automatically happen. The district should do what is best for the entire student body at all times. What does the Asian Student Union think of this idea? After all, they are the largest demographic in our school district. There is not a police officer anywhere that would ever put their weapon anywhere other than on their hip when in uniform.


Former PTown Resident
Registered user
Stoneridge
on Nov 18, 2022 at 1:52 pm
Former PTown Resident, Stoneridge
Registered user
on Nov 18, 2022 at 1:52 pm

Since schools are gun free zones, they are soft targets for shooters and, as history has shown, shootings take place. So if there were a shooting at FHS, which I hope never happens, would the police allowed to bring their guns on campus at that time or not? Just imagine if an SRO was on campus and something bad took place. They'd have to run out to their car, get their gun, and run back in. I'd guess 5-10 students could be killed within that timeframe.

Also, "Someone could reach for the officer’s gun, and it could just be so bad.” - It's been a while since I was in high school, and maybe this is a problem that PUSD should address to the lack of teaching common sense and morals.

These crybaby kids need to grow up and know that there are bad people out there that want to do harm, and that they are an easy target. They should be thankful and grateful that the police are around to protect them. If they don't break the law, they have nothing to worry about, or if they do break the law and an officer says stop, just listen to the officer so they can assess the situation. Be home by 10pm. Bad things happen after 10pm.

I just wish some members of our society would stop playing the race card all the time.


Jennifer P
Registered user
Pleasanton Valley
on Nov 18, 2022 at 3:34 pm
Jennifer P, Pleasanton Valley
Registered user
on Nov 18, 2022 at 3:34 pm

@Former Ptown Resident - really?

When you say things like “If they don't break the law, they have nothing to worry about, or if they do break the law and an officer says stop, just listen to the officer so they can assess the situation” are you really oblivious to the numerous reported instances where unarmed Black citizens are shot and killed (some while sleeping) or are you intentionally choosing to be obtuse?


SHale99
Registered user
Village High School
on Nov 18, 2022 at 4:22 pm
SHale99, Village High School
Registered user
on Nov 18, 2022 at 4:22 pm

I actually prefer there are SRO's and that they are armed. Plus, I have to say, at my school the kids actually dig their SRO; no complaints at all.


Former PTown Resident
Registered user
Stoneridge
on Nov 20, 2022 at 2:03 pm
Former PTown Resident, Stoneridge
Registered user
on Nov 20, 2022 at 2:03 pm

To Jennifer P - I'm well aware for those few and far between cases that you cite. Do you realize more than twice as many whites are killed annually by the police than blacks? Those instances that occur to blacks make the media news, they get the clicks, the viewers, and the support from the vocal left wingers. Look at the data and don't always listen/trust the left wing media. While you look at the actual data, take a look at the crime committed by minorities; it's out of proportion from whites.

I'm also wondering if FHS or AVHS has a White Student Union, WSU? If not, would it be allowed?

What's it going to take for the minorities to move on? After the UK, the US was the second country in the world to outlaw slavery. The Civil War ended slavery. Since then, we've done everything to knock down racism. We were finally reaching that point and now the racist card has to be played at every instance, and many of those instances are from the Jussie Smollett of the world. Everyone is yelling that we need "diversity", which is just another word for "quotas". Over 3 million Blacks have immigrated to the US in the past 30 years. If the US was so racist, why did they move here? That's 9 times as many slaves that came to the US, who were sold by other Blacks. As I tell people, feel free to move to any country that you feel is more diverse and less racist than this Country. You'll move back.

While you're doing actual research, look up the "the party of slavery", "how many Union Whites died in the Civil War", "Black on Black Homicides", Police killings by race". If I were these BSU students, I'd be more concerned about their welfare from their own race than from the police.


Karl A
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Nov 20, 2022 at 6:23 pm
Karl A, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Nov 20, 2022 at 6:23 pm

Whether a WSU being permitted is an interesting question.

The Pleasanton Weekly reported in February 2022 that the student population is made up of 30% white and 50% asian. 1 % of the student population is black.

Clearly black students should continue to work as a group to focus on being treated fairly since they are grossly under represented in the community.

What about the white students?

Or how about the asian students that are clearly discriminated against is our society as shown in the cases against Harvard and UNC brought to the supreme court?

Maybe with the diversification of our state’s population, with there being no group having such a large majority as whites had in the past - at least in wealthy areas like Pleasanton - it’s time to start moving away from racial preferences for certain groups. To move to a society that truly treats all people equally and without racial bias.


JJ
Registered user
Birdland
on Nov 21, 2022 at 7:55 am
JJ, Birdland
Registered user
on Nov 21, 2022 at 7:55 am

Well that’s what the civil rights act of 1957, 1960 and 1964 was supposed to do. Non discrimination. Fun fact. The no vote consisted of 78% Democrats. The 74 day filibuster was led by southern democrats who overwhelmingly voted against it. The Democratic Party also founded the kkk. So we still have not learned that racial discrimination is racism and is wrong regardless Of the color. Now we see the left trying to continue to divide this country by race . Started with Obama continued with Biden.
Biden literally said he would not hire white people or men for the vp job. Looking for racism and sexism look no further than racist joe Biden. Remember he had a mentor and good friend who was a grand cyclops in the kkk. So yea let’s talk about racial discrimination and why no one on this thread or the pw “ journalists can write the story of how the pres racially discriminated in hiring. Said he would then did it. Let’s have an open debate about racial discrimination. Let’s start at the top with Biden and his ilk.


eledge
Registered user
Vineyard Hills
on Nov 21, 2022 at 10:52 am
eledge, Vineyard Hills
Registered user
on Nov 21, 2022 at 10:52 am

While I appreciate the students exercising their voices and sharing input, both the student body and the parents were surveyed last year and the results showed that everyone feels better having the SRO's on campus. I have seen firsthand the relationships they form with students and the care and attention they pour into our schools. We need more of these connections between youth and law enforcement not less!


Jake Waters
Registered user
Birdland
on Nov 21, 2022 at 1:52 pm
Jake Waters, Birdland
Registered user
on Nov 21, 2022 at 1:52 pm

@ Former PTown Resident

You beat me to the response. You covered everything I would have hit, so thank you.

I look at it this way: my kids are grown, and I still pay taxes for the schools. As a matter of fact, I’m going to be paying more taxes to the schools because of Measure I. So, I demand that Foothill have an armed SRO to protect the investment I am paying for.


Joe V
Registered user
Birdland
on Nov 21, 2022 at 9:39 pm
Joe V, Birdland
Registered user
on Nov 21, 2022 at 9:39 pm

This all started when the student services staff for the Pleasanton School District asked student groups, like the Black Student Union, for feedback, or their thoughts on what could be helpful for them. These young students, possibly some could be 15 years old, proceeded to ask why the officers were armed in school grounds, suggesting an alternative. They waited to hear back on their suggestion, but never heard from anyone, so the article claims. And that is their main gripe, that no one got back to them, not that their suggestion wasn't implemented. It would have been very helpful if someone would have explained to these students that officers always have to be armed. They could have asked an officer to meet with them, explaining the situation. That is all this is about, no need to hate on these young people trying to make their way through life.


keeknlinda
Registered user
Vintage Hills
on Nov 22, 2022 at 2:55 pm
keeknlinda, Vintage Hills
Registered user
on Nov 22, 2022 at 2:55 pm

It is unfortunate the BSU advisor(s) failed to adequately inform the students of how school district meetings work and the schedule, so the students could learn the process. Presumably, she was privy to the students' suggestion that SROs leave their weapons in their car in the parking lot of the high school. It would have been an opportunity for her to make them aware that a young Pleasanton woman was shot and killed by a federal officer's weapon which had been left in his locked car, the car broken into and the gun stolen. Law enforcement officers are not permitted to leave their weapons in cars for that very reason, and while a 15-year-old wouldn't be expected to know that, advisors are supposed to be on hand to advise. Such a comment by a student certainly should have raised a red flag and should have opened up a discussion of why MOUs are what they are and why SROs carry their sidearms.
Rather than forming a Black Student Union as a forum for students to voice concerns, why not skip the segregation and encourage ALL students to participate in a Foothill High Student Union. Representatives from the entire student body, assuring all ethnic groups have representation can come together in an inclusionary forum, with voices from all groups given equal attention. Each group can learn from the other, share visions, expectations, and gain greater understanding of one another by working with one another rather than as separate interests. Help them find their similarities instead of accenting their differences. Advisors need to actively advise, not just listen. PUSD needs to get on the same page and adopt greater communication measures to ensure all the cogs are running smoothly. It does truly take a village, and these young people are ripe for lunderstanding how to become responsible participants in that village. Other cities are not this city. These youngsters must learn to trust this as a place of safety and the police as persons who protect.


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