News

University of California advises of personal information at risk after cyberattack

Part of nationwide breach involving tech company Accellion

Staff and students at the University of California at Berkeley and other UC campuses statewide are being advised to take immediate steps to protect their personal information, including credit and identity theft monitoring, in the wake of a national cyberattack announced the previous week.

The entire University of California system was included in those victimized in the breach, and emails soon started arriving at university-related accounts threatening to release information.

"This was part of a national cyberattack involving several hundred institutions across the United States," the university's Office of Emergency Management said in an advisory Tuesday, noting that Social Security numbers and bank account information "may be at risk."

The data breach involves the technology company Accellion, contracted by UC and others to transfer information.

"Accellion was the target of an international cyberattack where the perpetrators exploited a vulnerability in Accellion's program and attacked roughly 100 organizations," the university said. "The attackers are now attempting to get money from organizations and individuals" by threatening to publish the information on the dark web.

What's local journalism worth to you?

Support PleasantonWeekly.com for as little as $5/month.

Join

"We are working with local and federal law enforcement and third-party vendors to investigate this incident, to assess the information that has been compromised, to enforce the law, and to limit the release of stolen information," the university said.

"To help you protect your identity, we are offering the entire UC community complimentary credit monitoring and identity theft protection for one year through Experian IdentityWorksSM," officials said.

Anyone in the university community receiving suspicious emails is asked to report them to campus IT staff and not to click on any links or reply to the sender.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox.

Sign up

Follow PleasantonWeekly.com and the Pleasanton Weekly on Twitter @pleasantonnews, Facebook and on Instagram @pleasantonweekly for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

University of California advises of personal information at risk after cyberattack

Part of nationwide breach involving tech company Accellion

by /

Uploaded: Sun, Apr 11, 2021, 5:31 pm

Staff and students at the University of California at Berkeley and other UC campuses statewide are being advised to take immediate steps to protect their personal information, including credit and identity theft monitoring, in the wake of a national cyberattack announced the previous week.

The entire University of California system was included in those victimized in the breach, and emails soon started arriving at university-related accounts threatening to release information.

"This was part of a national cyberattack involving several hundred institutions across the United States," the university's Office of Emergency Management said in an advisory Tuesday, noting that Social Security numbers and bank account information "may be at risk."

The data breach involves the technology company Accellion, contracted by UC and others to transfer information.

"Accellion was the target of an international cyberattack where the perpetrators exploited a vulnerability in Accellion's program and attacked roughly 100 organizations," the university said. "The attackers are now attempting to get money from organizations and individuals" by threatening to publish the information on the dark web.

"We are working with local and federal law enforcement and third-party vendors to investigate this incident, to assess the information that has been compromised, to enforce the law, and to limit the release of stolen information," the university said.

"To help you protect your identity, we are offering the entire UC community complimentary credit monitoring and identity theft protection for one year through Experian IdentityWorksSM," officials said.

Anyone in the university community receiving suspicious emails is asked to report them to campus IT staff and not to click on any links or reply to the sender.

Comments

There are no comments yet. Please share yours below.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.