News

Governor announces new state-at-home order triggered by regional ICU capacity

If current COVID trends persist, Bay Area on pace to see new restrictions later this month

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a new stay-at-home order Thursday that will be targeted at regions of the state with diminished intensive care unit capacity as the state attempts to slow its surge of new COVID-19 cases.

Counties with less than 15% of their intensive care unit beds open and available will be subject to the order, according to Newsom, requiring the closure of nearly all nonessential businesses for at least three weeks.

Retail stores in areas affected by the order will be allowed to remain open at 20% of their maximum indoor capacity while most other nonessential businesses like hair and nail salons, restaurants, wineries and fitness centers would be required to close both indoor and outdoor operations.

Schools that have already reopened in-person classes will be allowed to continue and such decisions will be left to county officials, Newsom said.

"We do not anticipate having to do this again, but we really all need to step up, we need to meet this moment head-on and we need to do everything we can to stem the tide, to bend the curve and give us the time necessary ... to get those vaccines in the hands of all Californians," Newsom said Thursday in a briefing announcing the new order.

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The stay-at-home order will be enforced at a regional level rather than by county, as the state's pandemic-related health restrictions have been enforced for much of the year.

The regions include the Bay Area, greater Sacramento, Northern California, Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley.

The counties in each region will be placed in the appropriate tier of the state's pandemic reopening system, based on their case and test data, once they have reduced their ICU patient populations.

Four of the five regions are likely to pass the 15% threshold in the coming days, Newsom said, while the Bay Area is on pace to have less than 15% of its ICU beds available by mid-December.

The formal details of the order come just days after Newsom and state Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly said California's hospital and ICU systems were on track to be overwhelmed, and in some cases entirely full, by Christmas.

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Ghaly said Thursday that the state's rate of transmission has increased four-fold over the last six weeks and limiting movement and social mixing and interaction throughout the state will be key to curbing the current surge.

"It isn't about single sector-by-sector and where is that spread happening," Ghaly said when asked why some businesses that may not be responsible for spreading the virus will still be subject to closure under the order.

"We know that by reducing our overall movement and mixing for a short period of time, we can get the gains that we need to bend this curve," he said.

Newsom framed the order as part of the "final surge" of new coronavirus cases as the state begins to receive hundreds of thousands of vaccine doses in the coming weeks.

The state is expected to receive its first shipment of roughly 327,000 vaccine doses from the pharmaceutical company Pfizer between Dec. 12 and 15 with more doses of vaccines made by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies like Moderna and AstraZenica expected in the first quarter of 2021, Newsom said.

Given that the state's first tranche of vaccine doses amounts to enough for less than 1 percent of California's population, Newsom said the state's working group overseeing vaccine safety and distribution has separated the first vaccine recipients into three tiers based on risk of contracting the virus.

Hospital workers, nursing and assisted living facility workers, paramedics and other emergency service personnel and dialysis center employees will be in the first tier to receive the vaccine's two doses, according to Newsom.

The other two tiers include in-home health care workers, primary care clinic workers, laboratory workers, dental health clinic employees and pharmacy staff not working in higher-tier settings.

Newsom said the state will also make a concerted effort to ensure the vaccine is available to every resident of the state, not just those with means.

"Help is on the way," he said. "There is a light at the end of this tunnel."

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— Bay City News Service

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Governor announces new state-at-home order triggered by regional ICU capacity

If current COVID trends persist, Bay Area on pace to see new restrictions later this month

Uploaded: Thu, Dec 3, 2020, 3:39 pm

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a new stay-at-home order Thursday that will be targeted at regions of the state with diminished intensive care unit capacity as the state attempts to slow its surge of new COVID-19 cases.

Counties with less than 15% of their intensive care unit beds open and available will be subject to the order, according to Newsom, requiring the closure of nearly all nonessential businesses for at least three weeks.

Retail stores in areas affected by the order will be allowed to remain open at 20% of their maximum indoor capacity while most other nonessential businesses like hair and nail salons, restaurants, wineries and fitness centers would be required to close both indoor and outdoor operations.

Schools that have already reopened in-person classes will be allowed to continue and such decisions will be left to county officials, Newsom said.

"We do not anticipate having to do this again, but we really all need to step up, we need to meet this moment head-on and we need to do everything we can to stem the tide, to bend the curve and give us the time necessary ... to get those vaccines in the hands of all Californians," Newsom said Thursday in a briefing announcing the new order.

The stay-at-home order will be enforced at a regional level rather than by county, as the state's pandemic-related health restrictions have been enforced for much of the year.

The regions include the Bay Area, greater Sacramento, Northern California, Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley.

The counties in each region will be placed in the appropriate tier of the state's pandemic reopening system, based on their case and test data, once they have reduced their ICU patient populations.

Four of the five regions are likely to pass the 15% threshold in the coming days, Newsom said, while the Bay Area is on pace to have less than 15% of its ICU beds available by mid-December.

The formal details of the order come just days after Newsom and state Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly said California's hospital and ICU systems were on track to be overwhelmed, and in some cases entirely full, by Christmas.

Ghaly said Thursday that the state's rate of transmission has increased four-fold over the last six weeks and limiting movement and social mixing and interaction throughout the state will be key to curbing the current surge.

"It isn't about single sector-by-sector and where is that spread happening," Ghaly said when asked why some businesses that may not be responsible for spreading the virus will still be subject to closure under the order.

"We know that by reducing our overall movement and mixing for a short period of time, we can get the gains that we need to bend this curve," he said.

Newsom framed the order as part of the "final surge" of new coronavirus cases as the state begins to receive hundreds of thousands of vaccine doses in the coming weeks.

The state is expected to receive its first shipment of roughly 327,000 vaccine doses from the pharmaceutical company Pfizer between Dec. 12 and 15 with more doses of vaccines made by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies like Moderna and AstraZenica expected in the first quarter of 2021, Newsom said.

Given that the state's first tranche of vaccine doses amounts to enough for less than 1 percent of California's population, Newsom said the state's working group overseeing vaccine safety and distribution has separated the first vaccine recipients into three tiers based on risk of contracting the virus.

Hospital workers, nursing and assisted living facility workers, paramedics and other emergency service personnel and dialysis center employees will be in the first tier to receive the vaccine's two doses, according to Newsom.

The other two tiers include in-home health care workers, primary care clinic workers, laboratory workers, dental health clinic employees and pharmacy staff not working in higher-tier settings.

Newsom said the state will also make a concerted effort to ensure the vaccine is available to every resident of the state, not just those with means.

"Help is on the way," he said. "There is a light at the end of this tunnel."

— Bay City News Service

Comments

Willy
Registered user
Old Towne
on Dec 4, 2020 at 9:23 am
Willy, Old Towne
Registered user
on Dec 4, 2020 at 9:23 am
15 people like this

How many businesses will close for good with this action? Another bad call by our Liberal Governor!


Mr. Julius
Registered user
Downtown
on Dec 4, 2020 at 10:31 am
Mr. Julius, Downtown
Registered user
on Dec 4, 2020 at 10:31 am
16 people like this

Our Governor has now had 9 months to put his plan together beyond rolling shutdowns. His predecessor, Governor Brown, sold off our Emergency backup supplies & three large mobile hospitals.

Newson unilaterally sent $1 Billion to China for face masks. Journalist Adam Housley from Napa suggests upgraded air filtration systems for small businesses would be far cheaper and more effective than lockdowns. Imagine the businesses, jobs, and tax revenues we would save.


Claudette McDermott
Registered user
Del Prado
on Dec 4, 2020 at 10:56 am
Claudette McDermott, Del Prado
Registered user
on Dec 4, 2020 at 10:56 am
22 people like this

The Virus and irresponsible behavior in our communities are to blame, not the Governor. Lockdowns are necessary because the virus is out of control. No one person can stop it. The community has to act responsibly in order to stop shut downs by stopping the contraction of the virus. If our community can not act responsibly, in order to stop the spread, it shows by the virus numbers going up. These are not Normal Times! Stay home! Don't travel! Don 't visit with other households! Keep travel to work related needs, grocery needs... Thanksgiving Travel was ridiculous! Risky behavior by Kids and Adults with their parties and gatherings are to blame. Blame those people, not our Governor.


Willy
Registered user
Old Towne
on Dec 4, 2020 at 11:11 am
Willy, Old Towne
Registered user
on Dec 4, 2020 at 11:11 am
16 people like this

Claudette, it would appear that you do not understand the economic ramifications of your comments!


James Michael
Registered user
Val Vista
on Dec 4, 2020 at 11:50 am
James Michael, Val Vista
Registered user
on Dec 4, 2020 at 11:50 am
21 people like this

Claudette M...It's too bad that politicians don't follow their own words and stay home and not go to gatherings, SF Mayor and Gov going to the same restaurant, and YES the Governor is to blame


MichaelB
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Dec 5, 2020 at 9:35 am
MichaelB, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Dec 5, 2020 at 9:35 am
13 people like this

"The Virus and irresponsible behavior in our communities are to blame, not the Governor. Lockdowns are necessary because the virus is out of control. No one person can stop it. The community has to act responsibly in order to stop shut downs by stopping the contraction of the virus. If our community can not act responsibly, in order to stop the spread, it shows by the virus numbers going up."


Lockdowns are not necessary and have their own damaging effects to the community. Most people (over 98%) who contract the virus are going to recover. A better approach would be to devise a plan isolating/protecting those most at risk and vulnerable (elderly and/or those with preexisting conditions). Given what we now know about the virus, it is irresponsible to simply count those who are infected and then use this as a justification to disrupt the lives/employment/well being of everyone else. The governor is to blame for doing this.


MichaelB
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Dec 5, 2020 at 9:44 am
MichaelB, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Dec 5, 2020 at 9:44 am
12 people like this

"Claudette, it would appear that you do not understand the economic ramifications of your comments!"


As far as the economics are concerned, so called "progressive" politicians like and promote the current situation because more people become dependent on the government for their livelihoods vs. being employed and self sufficient. And that means more political power for them. We're seeing this with the need for a so called "equity index" (equality of results plan based on race) from Newsom before businesses/counties in the state are being permitted to reopen.


MichaelB
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Dec 5, 2020 at 10:34 am
MichaelB, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Dec 5, 2020 at 10:34 am
4 people like this

Should the title of this article have been "stay-at-home" vs. "state-at-home"?


James Michael
Registered user
Val Vista
on Dec 5, 2020 at 11:08 am
James Michael, Val Vista
Registered user
on Dec 5, 2020 at 11:08 am
12 people like this

If there is one thing that we should all have learned from this is that politicians ARE NOT LEADERS. Think about that next time you vote.


BobB
Registered user
Vintage Hills
on Dec 6, 2020 at 8:11 pm
BobB, Vintage Hills
Registered user
on Dec 6, 2020 at 8:11 pm
6 people like this

Vaccines are on the way! Things are looking There is a light at the end of the tunnel. Let's wear our masks, wash our hands, and stay away from social gatherings until we can slow the spread. It isn't much longer now. Remember to order take out from restaurants and support small businesses if you can. Let's keep them in business until we can get through this. I wish the government would have done a better job with this, but those of us who can afford to can do our part.

Have hope.


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