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Studying potable reuse water for Pleasanton

Original post made on Feb 12, 2020

The City Council postponed its discussion on a proposed "task order" (with a $250K pricetag for Pleasanton) for more regional studies into potable reuse in the Tri-Valley last week, but some residents still had plenty to say.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Wednesday, February 12, 2020, 6:16 PM

Comments (9)

9 people like this
Posted by Michael Austin
a resident of Pleasanton Meadows
on Feb 12, 2020 at 6:35 pm

Hetch Hetchy water flowing into San Francisco passes through Pleasanton and supplies Castlewood and points south. The city leadership needs to discuss and negotiate with the city of San Francisco for an alternate water supply for the city of Pleasanton.


12 people like this
Posted by Rhubarb
a resident of Carlton Oaks
on Feb 13, 2020 at 1:42 pm

No one likes to think about and acknowledge this: Our tap water is already recycled from sewage to potable, it's just that it's being used first by upstream communities who then discharge their treated sewage back into the environment. How is recycling to potable locally any different?


7 people like this
Posted by Michael
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 13, 2020 at 2:51 pm

Why isn't the Gates listed as a neighborhood? Before anything is done, I suggest researching all cities in CA that already use non-potable to tap water for their customers. How do they keep their community healthy or are they not healthy? A summary of findngs should be made public for edcuational purposes.


6 people like this
Posted by Michael
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 13, 2020 at 2:56 pm

In my previous comment, please use potable reuse in place of non-potable. My mistake.
I don't see a way to go back and edit it muself.


5 people like this
Posted by Fisher
a resident of Bordeaux Estates
on Feb 14, 2020 at 4:40 am

Uncleaned organic compounds (mostly difficult to oxidize), a suspension of activated sludge containing a mass of bacteria and protozoa, and a number of inorganic compounds, which include compounds of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), fall into the body of water with treated sewage from the city sewer. , salts of heavy metals, sulfates, chlorides, etc.


5 people like this
Posted by Sky
a resident of Castlewood
on Feb 14, 2020 at 4:43 am

In recent years, the use of treated wastewater in the chemical and metallurgical industries has received significant development. For this purpose, the wastewater after complete biological treatment is subjected to post-treatment on sand filters and, after chlorination, iodine is fed to feed the circulating systems. In particular, at the Chelyabinsk and Novolchpetsk metallurgical plants, it is planned to use the treated urban wastewater as the main source of water supply.


7 people like this
Posted by Thirst for Knowledge
a resident of Vintage Hills
on Feb 14, 2020 at 11:34 am

From Wikipedia:
The future of water reuse in California is expansion. With the population of California expected to nearly double by 2055[6] and with the anticipated effects of climate change in an already water-strained state, water reuse will continue to be an integral part of California's water story. The State Water Resources Control Board has laid out plans for the increased "use of recycled water over 2002 levels by at least one million acre-feet per year (AFY) by 2020 and by at least two million AFY by 2030."[4] The DWR reviews and updates the California Water Plan every 5 years. Currently, priority funding is given to new projects in the state that incorporate water reuse.[4]


5 people like this
Posted by Kiko
a resident of Val Vista
on Feb 14, 2020 at 7:31 pm

I have a house in Henderson, NV. That's a little south east of Las Vegas, on the desert and there is no water problem there.


7 people like this
Posted by Michael Austin
a resident of Pleasanton Meadows
on Feb 14, 2020 at 7:54 pm

Hoover Dam is eighteen miles from Henderson!


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