Sports

Injured Gaels' athlete overcomes obstacles to play again

Resolve and inner strength help after surgery, long recovery

During his long recovery from an injury, Adam Moore (front, not in uniform) stayed involved with his team as a member of the coaching staff, helping any way he could. (Courtesy of the Moore family.)

In the spring of 2021, Adam Moore was like any other high school football player in the Tri-Valley.

Happy to be back out on the field after missing the normal fall season with the COVID lockdown, Moore and his Dublin High teammates took to the field on March 7 for a scrimmage.

And that’s when it all changed for Moore.

The highly regarded junior receiver and safety was running a pass pattern when he felt a pain in his leg, taking him to the ground.

“When it first happened, I thought it was a cramp,” said Moore. “The next day I couldn’t get out of bed. But at that point, I still thought it would be okay.”

What's local journalism worth to you?

Support PleasantonWeekly.com for as little as $5/month.

Join

He went through the week thinking it would get better. He was even getting ready for a game the following Saturday, but he couldn’t go. It was at that point the Moore family decided it was time for Adam to see a doctor.

The news they got from the doctor on Sunday was not expected. What Moore thought to be a cramp turned out to be a tear of his left Achilles tendon.

“Initially we were all in denial,” said Adam’s father, Todd. “Adam said he just cramped at the time of the incident. He even went out that night after the game. About a week later we all understood the injury better.”

“It didn’t hit me until Friday,” said Adam. “The doctor told me I needed surgery. It sucked.”

It was time to decide the next step.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.

Adam’s mother Angel was heartbroken and reached out to a friend for comfort.

“As a mother my initial thoughts were what can I do to make this better and then I called my dear friend Lissa Olson and cried,” said Angel. “I cried because I learned the recovery was eight months, which meant that Adam would likely miss his senior year of football. If we were lucky, he could make it back for basketball. I cried for my son because he had no idea of the road ahead. He is such a positive person, and I knew his spirit would be tested.”

Olson is the wife of Las Vegas Raiders offensive coordinator Greg Olson. One phone call led to another and the Olson family was able to connect the Moores with orthopedic surgeon Dr. Warren King, known for his work with the Raiders.

A surgery date was set for April 7, one month after the injury and on Adam’s 17th birthday.

“I am a firm believer that struggle creates better humans. When the barbarians are at the gate what are you going to do - fight or flight? Adam was ready for the fight.”

-Todd Moore, Adam's father

“I was trying to stay positive,” said Adam. “I had never really had surgery. Everyone around me was so positive and my family was really keeping me going.”

Between Todd, Angel, and Adam’s two older brothers James and Max, the family circled the wagons for the youngest in the clan.

“Adam is positive most of the time – but even he had some rough patches,” said Todd. “Having insight of how long life is I tried to relay the message that he is very young and has a lot of life to live. This is a very temporary thing, and we will get through it together as a family. His older brothers have really stepped up in that department.”

The surgery went fine, but there was still the prognosis of an eight month recovery time. The timeline would take away his senior season of football and would eat into the basketball season as well.

“A lot of (negative) thoughts crept in,” said Adam of missing his senior year football season. “It was hard at first, but I had to accept it. I knew I would get through it.”

It takes resolve and inner strength to overcome a lengthy recovery and Adam has both traits by the truckload.

“The regular timeline was eight months, so I knew I had to go hard to get back,” said Adam.

The continued positive energy from his family and friends, as well as an inspirational video message from Klay Thompson – who also had an Achilles injury – were main players in his recovery.

Even though sidelined during his senior year football season, Adam Moore (front) will be able play basketball this fall. (Courtesy of the Moore family.)

But even with the positive thoughts and messages it wasn’t going to be an easy eight months – for Adam or his family.

“The hardest time for me was the moment I heard from the doctors how long it would take to recover,” said Angel. “Then when Adam was able to walk again, he limped and that made me very nervous. I would constantly tell him, squash the bug when he would walk (take a full step from heel to toe). He would get so annoyed with me and be like ‘I’m not trying to hear that mom. I’m not five’.”

When football season started, Adam kept involved as a member of the coaching staff, helping any way he could. It was a blessing, but also a curse as being on the sidelines and not on the field was taking a toll.

“Adam was committed to being there for his teammates and literally helped coach every week,” said Angel. “Not being able to play and help his team on the field was mentally tough for him. He is so happy for his friends’ success, but inside I know he was hurting. As a mother, knowing he’s in pain hurts.”

Todd kept Adam focused on making the entire journey through recovery a life-learning moment.

“Adam has been blessed in many ways in his life to this date,” said Todd. “I am a firm believer that struggle creates better humans. When the barbarians are at the gate what are you going to do - fight or flight? Adam was ready for the fight.”

And was he ever.

Six months into his recovery, Adam got some incredible news at a routine check-up – he had progressed well ahead of schedule and was cleared to return to activities.

“It was awesome,” said Adam of hearing the news. “I‘m not an overly emotional person, but I caught myself getting that way.”

Instead of helping the team from the sidelines, he was able to get back on the field, working on the scout team, as well as running and hitting the weight room.

He wasn’t dressed out in a football uniform but being back in any capacity helped clear the way to hit the basketball court when practice started early in November.

Initially it was a bit of struggle.

“The first two days were rough – I hadn’t played sports in six months,’” explained Adam. “At first going live I felt my body back up. But then everyone told me to go forward and just play.”

Dublin basketball coach Tom Costello was on hand when Moore was hurt. Costello’s son TJ is good friends with Moore, so Costello has been on the inside during Adam’s recovery.

“The way he has handled everything makes you realize the character he has,” said Costello of Moore. “He just kept working by himself – he’s kind of a throwback, old school. He’s the kind of kid you wish you could coach 12 of him.”

Basketball season kicks off Saturday for Dublin when the Gaels play host to Campolindo in an 8:30 p.m. contest and Adam will be on the court. Will there be some anxious moments for the family?

“Todd, James, Max, and I are so excited to watch him play,” said Angel. “I just love watching my boys play sports. He is ready, he has been working hard for months, and we have been praying for this moment.”

Todd agreed and as usual, keeps the perspective of the big picture.

“It’s in God’s hands,” said Todd. “We have no control over what may happen. He wants to compete, and we are behind him. Sports is a big part of our lives but it’s not the only thing. Through sports we become better people and that’s the end game.”

A front row seat to local high school sports.

Check out our new newsletter, the Playbook.

Looking for more Livermore stories? The Livermore Vine will be your new source of vital news and information. Sign up to be among the first to get our daily local news headlines sent to your inbox for free.

Follow PleasantonWeekly.com and the Pleasanton Weekly on Twitter @pleasantonnews, Facebook and on Instagram @pleasantonweekly for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Grab a front row seat to local high school sports.
Sign up for our FREE sports newsletter, the Playbook.

Injured Gaels' athlete overcomes obstacles to play again

Resolve and inner strength help after surgery, long recovery

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Mon, Nov 22, 2021, 5:36 pm

In the spring of 2021, Adam Moore was like any other high school football player in the Tri-Valley.

Happy to be back out on the field after missing the normal fall season with the COVID lockdown, Moore and his Dublin High teammates took to the field on March 7 for a scrimmage.

And that’s when it all changed for Moore.

The highly regarded junior receiver and safety was running a pass pattern when he felt a pain in his leg, taking him to the ground.

“When it first happened, I thought it was a cramp,” said Moore. “The next day I couldn’t get out of bed. But at that point, I still thought it would be okay.”

He went through the week thinking it would get better. He was even getting ready for a game the following Saturday, but he couldn’t go. It was at that point the Moore family decided it was time for Adam to see a doctor.

The news they got from the doctor on Sunday was not expected. What Moore thought to be a cramp turned out to be a tear of his left Achilles tendon.

“Initially we were all in denial,” said Adam’s father, Todd. “Adam said he just cramped at the time of the incident. He even went out that night after the game. About a week later we all understood the injury better.”

“It didn’t hit me until Friday,” said Adam. “The doctor told me I needed surgery. It sucked.”

It was time to decide the next step.

Adam’s mother Angel was heartbroken and reached out to a friend for comfort.

“As a mother my initial thoughts were what can I do to make this better and then I called my dear friend Lissa Olson and cried,” said Angel. “I cried because I learned the recovery was eight months, which meant that Adam would likely miss his senior year of football. If we were lucky, he could make it back for basketball. I cried for my son because he had no idea of the road ahead. He is such a positive person, and I knew his spirit would be tested.”

Olson is the wife of Las Vegas Raiders offensive coordinator Greg Olson. One phone call led to another and the Olson family was able to connect the Moores with orthopedic surgeon Dr. Warren King, known for his work with the Raiders.

A surgery date was set for April 7, one month after the injury and on Adam’s 17th birthday.

“I was trying to stay positive,” said Adam. “I had never really had surgery. Everyone around me was so positive and my family was really keeping me going.”

Between Todd, Angel, and Adam’s two older brothers James and Max, the family circled the wagons for the youngest in the clan.

“Adam is positive most of the time – but even he had some rough patches,” said Todd. “Having insight of how long life is I tried to relay the message that he is very young and has a lot of life to live. This is a very temporary thing, and we will get through it together as a family. His older brothers have really stepped up in that department.”

The surgery went fine, but there was still the prognosis of an eight month recovery time. The timeline would take away his senior season of football and would eat into the basketball season as well.

“A lot of (negative) thoughts crept in,” said Adam of missing his senior year football season. “It was hard at first, but I had to accept it. I knew I would get through it.”

It takes resolve and inner strength to overcome a lengthy recovery and Adam has both traits by the truckload.

“The regular timeline was eight months, so I knew I had to go hard to get back,” said Adam.

The continued positive energy from his family and friends, as well as an inspirational video message from Klay Thompson – who also had an Achilles injury – were main players in his recovery.

But even with the positive thoughts and messages it wasn’t going to be an easy eight months – for Adam or his family.

“The hardest time for me was the moment I heard from the doctors how long it would take to recover,” said Angel. “Then when Adam was able to walk again, he limped and that made me very nervous. I would constantly tell him, squash the bug when he would walk (take a full step from heel to toe). He would get so annoyed with me and be like ‘I’m not trying to hear that mom. I’m not five’.”

When football season started, Adam kept involved as a member of the coaching staff, helping any way he could. It was a blessing, but also a curse as being on the sidelines and not on the field was taking a toll.

“Adam was committed to being there for his teammates and literally helped coach every week,” said Angel. “Not being able to play and help his team on the field was mentally tough for him. He is so happy for his friends’ success, but inside I know he was hurting. As a mother, knowing he’s in pain hurts.”

Todd kept Adam focused on making the entire journey through recovery a life-learning moment.

“Adam has been blessed in many ways in his life to this date,” said Todd. “I am a firm believer that struggle creates better humans. When the barbarians are at the gate what are you going to do - fight or flight? Adam was ready for the fight.”

And was he ever.

Six months into his recovery, Adam got some incredible news at a routine check-up – he had progressed well ahead of schedule and was cleared to return to activities.

“It was awesome,” said Adam of hearing the news. “I‘m not an overly emotional person, but I caught myself getting that way.”

Instead of helping the team from the sidelines, he was able to get back on the field, working on the scout team, as well as running and hitting the weight room.

He wasn’t dressed out in a football uniform but being back in any capacity helped clear the way to hit the basketball court when practice started early in November.

Initially it was a bit of struggle.

“The first two days were rough – I hadn’t played sports in six months,’” explained Adam. “At first going live I felt my body back up. But then everyone told me to go forward and just play.”

Dublin basketball coach Tom Costello was on hand when Moore was hurt. Costello’s son TJ is good friends with Moore, so Costello has been on the inside during Adam’s recovery.

“The way he has handled everything makes you realize the character he has,” said Costello of Moore. “He just kept working by himself – he’s kind of a throwback, old school. He’s the kind of kid you wish you could coach 12 of him.”

Basketball season kicks off Saturday for Dublin when the Gaels play host to Campolindo in an 8:30 p.m. contest and Adam will be on the court. Will there be some anxious moments for the family?

“Todd, James, Max, and I are so excited to watch him play,” said Angel. “I just love watching my boys play sports. He is ready, he has been working hard for months, and we have been praying for this moment.”

Todd agreed and as usual, keeps the perspective of the big picture.

“It’s in God’s hands,” said Todd. “We have no control over what may happen. He wants to compete, and we are behind him. Sports is a big part of our lives but it’s not the only thing. Through sports we become better people and that’s the end game.”

Comments

There are no comments yet. Please share yours below.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.