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47 sheriff's deputies moved to desk jobs after audit finds they failed psychological exams

Internal review comes in wake of deputy being charged for double homicide in Dublin

Alameda County sheriff's officials believe 47 deputies who allegedly failed a psychological exam and now have desk jobs will pass the exam when they retake it and get their guns and peace officer powers back, a sheriff's spokesperson said Tuesday.

Alameda County Sheriff's Office logo.

The comment follows a sheriff's office audit that resulted in the deputies' loss of powers. That audit was prompted by the fatal shooting Sept. 7 of two people allegedly by then-Deputy Devin Williams Jr. of Stockton.

Williams, 24, has been charged with double murder for allegedly shooting a woman he was dating and her husband at the couple's home in Dublin.

"We believe the deputies will likely pass the retest," sheriff's spokesperson Lt. Ray Kelly said Tuesday.

The deputies reassigned represent less than 5% of the force. Thirty of the 47 deputies were assigned to Santa Rita Jail and 17 were assigned to other duties, including patrol, Kelly said.

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Sheriff's officials told the Alameda County District Attorney's Office about the reassignments and are unaware of any conflicts with criminal cases. But Kelly said they will keep an eye on that possibility.

A spokesperson for the District Attorney's Office said the office is evaluating the potential impact.

Alameda County Public Defender Brendon Woods issued a statement Tuesday, saying, "If these deputies were not fit for duty, then how can we trust them to investigate our clients and testify against them in court? How can we trust them to treat people properly at the jail?"

Woods said the "revelation could compromise hundreds of cases -- closed and pending."

But Woods said he needs "more information from the Sheriff and the District Attorney's Office."

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He said, "it's infuriating we had to learn about it (the reassignments) from the press."

The audits were conducted on all background investigations performed between January 2016 and the present, Alameda County Sheriff Gregory Ahern wrote in a Friday letter to the deputies.

Each of the deputies who were reassigned received a "D-Not Suited" score on the psychological exam.

Ahern said in his letter that the sheriff's office was under the impression that applicants could be hired if they received such a score.

That information was provided "years ago" from the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training, which sets "minimum selection and training standards for California law enforcement," according to Ahern.

"Unfortunately, this is not the case," Ahern wrote about the impression his office had.

Sheriff's officials and the county counsel for Alameda County researched that impression and found that it was in error.

No one from the commission responded to an email inquiry or calls about the reassignment of the deputies.

Ahern told the deputies in the letter that they can get a second opinion regarding their initial exam results. If the deputies receive a "Suitable" score, Ahern "can choose to hire the candidate."

Sheriff's officials intend to schedule retake exams for the 47 deputies. All 47 will retain their pay and benefits and can continue to work for the sheriff's office.

The deputies cannot carry a gun, make any arrests, issue traffic citations "or perform any function for peace officers," Ahern wrote.

"Our intention is to resolve this issue as quickly as possible," Ahern said. "We also intend to have you return to full duty status once you obtain a 'Suitable' finding."

Ahern is in the final months as sheriff-coroner. Sheriff-Elect Yesenia Sanchez, a commander in the sheriff's office, defeated her boss and another candidate outright in the June primary election with 52.84% of the vote. Sanchez is scheduled to take office in January.

The future of the criminal cases involving these deputies may also be impacted by voters this year. With current District Attorney Nancy O'Malley retiring, two candidates – civil rights attorney Pamela Price and chief deputy DA Terry Wiley – are facing each other in a runoff election to win the DA seat in the Nov. 8 general election.

Alameda County Sheriff Gregory Ahern's letter to sheriff's deputies who allegedly failed a psychological exam as part of their background investigation (Image courtesy ACSO, via BCN)

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47 sheriff's deputies moved to desk jobs after audit finds they failed psychological exams

Internal review comes in wake of deputy being charged for double homicide in Dublin

by Keith Burbank / Bay City News Service

Uploaded: Tue, Sep 27, 2022, 2:05 pm

Alameda County sheriff's officials believe 47 deputies who allegedly failed a psychological exam and now have desk jobs will pass the exam when they retake it and get their guns and peace officer powers back, a sheriff's spokesperson said Tuesday.

The comment follows a sheriff's office audit that resulted in the deputies' loss of powers. That audit was prompted by the fatal shooting Sept. 7 of two people allegedly by then-Deputy Devin Williams Jr. of Stockton.

Williams, 24, has been charged with double murder for allegedly shooting a woman he was dating and her husband at the couple's home in Dublin.

"We believe the deputies will likely pass the retest," sheriff's spokesperson Lt. Ray Kelly said Tuesday.

The deputies reassigned represent less than 5% of the force. Thirty of the 47 deputies were assigned to Santa Rita Jail and 17 were assigned to other duties, including patrol, Kelly said.

Sheriff's officials told the Alameda County District Attorney's Office about the reassignments and are unaware of any conflicts with criminal cases. But Kelly said they will keep an eye on that possibility.

A spokesperson for the District Attorney's Office said the office is evaluating the potential impact.

Alameda County Public Defender Brendon Woods issued a statement Tuesday, saying, "If these deputies were not fit for duty, then how can we trust them to investigate our clients and testify against them in court? How can we trust them to treat people properly at the jail?"

Woods said the "revelation could compromise hundreds of cases -- closed and pending."

But Woods said he needs "more information from the Sheriff and the District Attorney's Office."

He said, "it's infuriating we had to learn about it (the reassignments) from the press."

The audits were conducted on all background investigations performed between January 2016 and the present, Alameda County Sheriff Gregory Ahern wrote in a Friday letter to the deputies.

Each of the deputies who were reassigned received a "D-Not Suited" score on the psychological exam.

Ahern said in his letter that the sheriff's office was under the impression that applicants could be hired if they received such a score.

That information was provided "years ago" from the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training, which sets "minimum selection and training standards for California law enforcement," according to Ahern.

"Unfortunately, this is not the case," Ahern wrote about the impression his office had.

Sheriff's officials and the county counsel for Alameda County researched that impression and found that it was in error.

No one from the commission responded to an email inquiry or calls about the reassignment of the deputies.

Ahern told the deputies in the letter that they can get a second opinion regarding their initial exam results. If the deputies receive a "Suitable" score, Ahern "can choose to hire the candidate."

Sheriff's officials intend to schedule retake exams for the 47 deputies. All 47 will retain their pay and benefits and can continue to work for the sheriff's office.

The deputies cannot carry a gun, make any arrests, issue traffic citations "or perform any function for peace officers," Ahern wrote.

"Our intention is to resolve this issue as quickly as possible," Ahern said. "We also intend to have you return to full duty status once you obtain a 'Suitable' finding."

Ahern is in the final months as sheriff-coroner. Sheriff-Elect Yesenia Sanchez, a commander in the sheriff's office, defeated her boss and another candidate outright in the June primary election with 52.84% of the vote. Sanchez is scheduled to take office in January.

The future of the criminal cases involving these deputies may also be impacted by voters this year. With current District Attorney Nancy O'Malley retiring, two candidates – civil rights attorney Pamela Price and chief deputy DA Terry Wiley – are facing each other in a runoff election to win the DA seat in the Nov. 8 general election.

Comments

Ob
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Sep 28, 2022 at 5:50 am
Ob, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2022 at 5:50 am

This is an astounding accomplishment of incompetence.


factchecker
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Sep 28, 2022 at 10:04 am
factchecker, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2022 at 10:04 am

Wow, just wow!! Another reason for the election result in the sherriff's race!!


Bob Britton
Registered user
another community
on Sep 28, 2022 at 12:19 pm
Bob Britton, another community
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2022 at 12:19 pm

And the Sheriff calls it "unfortunate" he can't hire people who are deemed "not suited" for employment.


Joe V
Registered user
Birdland
on Sep 28, 2022 at 12:41 pm
Joe V, Birdland
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2022 at 12:41 pm

Good thing that Sheriff Ahern was not reelected!
Sheriff Ahern's office is still saying that all 47 officers, or 100%, will pass the test on the the second try, and everything will be resolved quickly.
What about all the lawsuits, that Alameda County taxpayers will have to cover? Are they going to be resolved quickly also?
Would be good to hear from new elected Yesenia Sanchez.


MissViv
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Sep 28, 2022 at 1:57 pm
MissViv, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2022 at 1:57 pm

Since the sheriff says it, I guess they will all pass, maybe they have been told how to answer "correctly". I would prefer that the deputies were given training and some time for their behavior to be observed after the training to see if it has really changed their approach to their work. As a citizen with no record, I have had unpleasant interactions with several in the sheriff's dept. I can't imagine what it would be like to be a suspect in their custody.


Jake Waters
Registered user
Birdland
on Sep 28, 2022 at 4:31 pm
Jake Waters, Birdland
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2022 at 4:31 pm

“Olly Olly Oxen free!” Or is it CYA?

I love this statement by the Sheriff: “Our intention is to resolve this issue as quickly as possible," Ahern said. "We also intend to have you return to full duty status once you obtain a 'Suitable' finding."

Well excuse me, you had a lot of time during the hiring process to get the best applicants possible, NOT to fulfill your political ideology of ‘equity hires.’ They knew they were walking a fine line when these hires were given ‘D’ ratings. Is that what the public deserves from the ACSO, rejects roaming the streets? We pay ALL your salaries and demand quality officers to perform their duties. Go Woke and Go Broke.


Becky
Registered user
Livermore
on Sep 29, 2022 at 8:39 am
Becky, Livermore
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2022 at 8:39 am

Is the test that ALCO sheriff used a standard test that every department in California uses, or can every police department pick their own? I've heard that only 1% of the population has the right personality to become a LEO.
It would be interesting to know what areas they failed at.


Jake Waters
Registered user
Birdland
on Oct 1, 2022 at 5:37 pm
Jake Waters, Birdland
Registered user
on Oct 1, 2022 at 5:37 pm

An enormous amount of taxpayer money goes to supporting the salaries, benefits, training, and pensions of law enforcement, thusly, these constituents deserve the best the testing process provides. These were ‘D’ applicants so why are we holding onto them?


Stacey A Swanson
Registered user
Livermore
on Oct 5, 2022 at 9:58 am
Stacey A Swanson, Livermore
Registered user
on Oct 5, 2022 at 9:58 am

I'd submit that most LE officers don't want to work with colleagues who lack maturity, judgement and who may not be ethical. That might explain some of the hiring challenges. Their lives are also affected by working with less than stellar folks.
So glad we are making a change.
We deserve better.


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