News

Planning Commission to hold community workshop on Stoneridge Mall framework process

City accepting public input on proposed redevelopment of Pleasanton shopping center

Stoneridge Shopping Center in Pleasanton. (File photo)

The Pleasanton Planning Commission is set to hold a Stoneridge Mall framework workshop on Monday at 6 p.m. to review and accept public input on developing housing at the shopping center.

The City Council had included the mall in its 2023-31 Housing Element site list to serve as a location for high-density housing units that could be developed if rezoning as contemplated is approved.

City staff began the process of developing the framework plan for the mall after councilmembers approved the request from staff at the Aug. 16 council meeting.

The framework will outline the mixed-use plans for the mall property including blueprints for the proposed 900 to 1,400 housing units that could be developed after rezoning as part of the Housing Element update.

"The focus of the framework is the mall properties that lie within the area bounded by Stoneridge Mall Road and contain the mall buildings and surrounding parking lots," according to the city's website. "The framework plan will provide a conceptual land use and circulation plan, and policy guidance for future development/redevelopment of the shopping center, that considers the integration and distribution of new residential and commercial land uses with existing retail uses."

Help sustain the local news you depend on.

Your contribution matters. Become a member today.

Join

Staff will have approximately six to eight months before the Housing Element is anticipated to be adopted to gather community input, outline allowed land-uses and provide initial conceptual planning for the mall property.

During the Aug. 16 council meeting, staff told the council that the planning efforts will include gathering background information on the site, understanding all of the opportunities and constraints that exist and looking for inspiration in similar projects that have been developed around the country.

In that same meeting, the council approved to allocate $176,400 from its general fund contingency to cover the consultant costs for financial analysis, traffic and transportation analysis and urban design and planning costs.

The framework process is expected to conclude in spring 2023.

The joint community workshop and Planning Commission meeting on Monday (Sept. 26) can be accessed via Zoom here.

Stay informed

Get the latest local news and information sent straight to your inbox.

Stay informed

Get the latest local news and information sent straight to your inbox.

Christian Trujano
 
Christian Trujano, a Bay Area native and San Jose State alum, joined Embarcadero Media in May 2022 following his graduation. He is an award-winning student journalist who has covered stories in San Jose ranging from crime to higher education. Read more >>

Follow PleasantonWeekly.com and the Pleasanton Weekly on Twitter @pleasantonnews, Facebook and on Instagram @pleasantonweekly for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Your support is vital to us continuing to bring you city government news. Become a member today.

Planning Commission to hold community workshop on Stoneridge Mall framework process

City accepting public input on proposed redevelopment of Pleasanton shopping center

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 2:50 pm

The Pleasanton Planning Commission is set to hold a Stoneridge Mall framework workshop on Monday at 6 p.m. to review and accept public input on developing housing at the shopping center.

The City Council had included the mall in its 2023-31 Housing Element site list to serve as a location for high-density housing units that could be developed if rezoning as contemplated is approved.

City staff began the process of developing the framework plan for the mall after councilmembers approved the request from staff at the Aug. 16 council meeting.

The framework will outline the mixed-use plans for the mall property including blueprints for the proposed 900 to 1,400 housing units that could be developed after rezoning as part of the Housing Element update.

"The focus of the framework is the mall properties that lie within the area bounded by Stoneridge Mall Road and contain the mall buildings and surrounding parking lots," according to the city's website. "The framework plan will provide a conceptual land use and circulation plan, and policy guidance for future development/redevelopment of the shopping center, that considers the integration and distribution of new residential and commercial land uses with existing retail uses."

Staff will have approximately six to eight months before the Housing Element is anticipated to be adopted to gather community input, outline allowed land-uses and provide initial conceptual planning for the mall property.

During the Aug. 16 council meeting, staff told the council that the planning efforts will include gathering background information on the site, understanding all of the opportunities and constraints that exist and looking for inspiration in similar projects that have been developed around the country.

In that same meeting, the council approved to allocate $176,400 from its general fund contingency to cover the consultant costs for financial analysis, traffic and transportation analysis and urban design and planning costs.

The framework process is expected to conclude in spring 2023.

The joint community workshop and Planning Commission meeting on Monday (Sept. 26) can be accessed via Zoom here.

Comments

MissViv
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Sep 26, 2022 at 10:12 am
MissViv, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2022 at 10:12 am

What about our slim water supplies? How are we supposed to provide water for all these new residents? All aspects of adding this many people to our population should be examined and evaluated before it's approved.


Gloria
Registered user
Pleasanton Valley
on Sep 26, 2022 at 11:56 am
Gloria, Pleasanton Valley
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2022 at 11:56 am

WATER is the issue along with electricity or are windmills going up?


Jake Waters
Registered user
Birdland
on Sep 26, 2022 at 8:48 pm
Jake Waters, Birdland
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2022 at 8:48 pm

Is Matt Sullivan going to get involved to stop this Section 8 housing development? After all, he and others made loud screams about Costco because of the projected traffic congestion, vehicle exhaust, and more. Pleasanton is becoming the town of low income housing. It’s losing its charm and significance. Sad.


keeknlinda
Registered user
Vintage Hills
on Sep 27, 2022 at 11:34 am
keeknlinda, Vintage Hills
Registered user
on Sep 27, 2022 at 11:34 am

@Jake Waters I didn't see your name among the 150+ residents of this still charming community who took the time to listen, learn, and participate in the shaping of the framework for this large property which has lost its former glory.
Portraying it only as Section 8 housing is unfair and untrue. It is the first step in what this city has been known for--planned progress. This time, real input from real residents is being sought and welcomed from the very first steps of that planning.
Lost charm? Hogwash. The Pleasanton I live in still has plenty of charm and significance. Negative bantering such as yours certainly doesn't contribute to it but I just hang out with different folks than you do.
Thank goodness there are at least 150 of us who are willing to approach the project with positive ideas and suggestions to help create an even more significant place we call home.


Just Another Resident
Registered user
Laguna Oaks
on Sep 27, 2022 at 1:57 pm
Just Another Resident, Laguna Oaks
Registered user
on Sep 27, 2022 at 1:57 pm

@Jake Waters - what is your concern about housing for lower income residents?


BobB
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Sep 27, 2022 at 2:48 pm
BobB, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 27, 2022 at 2:48 pm

The first two comments repeat the tired trope about water being a problem. It is a problem because nimby's refuse to add any capacity, and then complain there's no water available so we can't build. It's your fault that we haven't added recycling and storage so that there's plenty of water for new development.


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.