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Livermore PD's stop-and-arrest report finds 'no pattern of racial or ethnic disparity'

Analysis conducted as part of city's Equity and Inclusion subgroup on policing

Livermore Police Department. (Photo courtesy of LPD)

The Livermore City Council received a report Monday on an outside consultant's analysis of recent police department stop-and-arrest data that concluded "no clearly identifiable or concerning pattern of racial/ethnic disparity" in the encounters that took place during the specified time frame.

The analysis, which was completed as part of a project initiated by the city's Equity and Inclusion subgroup on policing, focused on Livermore Police Department statistics from between Jan. 1, 2019 and April 30, 2021.

"It's pretty incredible that our police force has acted in this unbiased way and that's not an easy thing to do and that's where the training and the commitment to acting well is pretty incredible and it's fantastic," said Mayor Bob Woerner upon hearing the report.

The initial scope of the project was to "examine contacts with the public during traffic stops to better understand the racial/ethnic composition of these encounters and their outcomes," according to the report.

To support this effort, the city contracted an independent research team of criminologists from the University of Texas at San Antonio to analyze two areas of possible disparities: traffic stops and arrests by Livermore police.

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While the Equity and Inclusion Working Group concluded back on June 15, 2021, this particular project was still underway and at the time, the council asked the police department and city staff to return upon the project's completion to share the results.

The researchers examined 22,737 traffic stops and 24,065 police and civilian encounters over the course of the 26-month period, according to a statement from LPD.

In the analysis of LPD traffic stops, two benchmarks were used as comparison points. The first benchmark was a “veil of darkness” (VOD) analysis that examined differences in stop rates of non-white and white drivers during the daytime compared to the nighttime. Possible racial bias is suggested when there’s a higher rate of non-white stops during daylight hours when race and ethnicity are more visible to the officers.

The second benchmark used vehicle crash data from an external State of California database and looked at the racial composition of not-at-fault and at-fault drivers involved in two-vehicle crashes.

For arrest analysis, the study examined whether civilian race/ethnicity predicted the likelihood of an arrest by Livermore Police after measuring other relevant factors such as encounter, civilian and officer characteristics.

The report indicated that there was no statistical difference between white and Black civilians in their likelihood of arrest and that Hispanic, Asian and "other" ethnic groups were less likely to be arrested compared to white civilians.

Another key finding from the report indicated that together, the results from the two benchmark analyses do not show a pattern of disparity in traffic stops based on driver race or ethnicity.

While the outcome of the analysis was positive, LPD Chief Jeramy Young said that continuing to review data is something he intends to carry forward.

"When we went into this project, I went in not knowing really what would happen. I thought that I knew what would happen because I know the quality of officers and community that we have and so, I wasn't surprised by the result but I was also prepared to deal with any issues that (the research team) found," Young said, adding that he sees value in data and that it's important to reflect to make sure the department is being the best it can be.

Toward the end of the discussion, all of the councilmembers expressed appreciation to the consultants, the police department and to Young for their work on this project. They also commended the department for demonstrating quality policing as reflected in the results of the report.

A complete recording of the Feb. 14 City Council meeting is available here.

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Livermore PD's stop-and-arrest report finds 'no pattern of racial or ethnic disparity'

Analysis conducted as part of city's Equity and Inclusion subgroup on policing

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Feb 16, 2022, 9:00 pm

The Livermore City Council received a report Monday on an outside consultant's analysis of recent police department stop-and-arrest data that concluded "no clearly identifiable or concerning pattern of racial/ethnic disparity" in the encounters that took place during the specified time frame.

The analysis, which was completed as part of a project initiated by the city's Equity and Inclusion subgroup on policing, focused on Livermore Police Department statistics from between Jan. 1, 2019 and April 30, 2021.

"It's pretty incredible that our police force has acted in this unbiased way and that's not an easy thing to do and that's where the training and the commitment to acting well is pretty incredible and it's fantastic," said Mayor Bob Woerner upon hearing the report.

The initial scope of the project was to "examine contacts with the public during traffic stops to better understand the racial/ethnic composition of these encounters and their outcomes," according to the report.

To support this effort, the city contracted an independent research team of criminologists from the University of Texas at San Antonio to analyze two areas of possible disparities: traffic stops and arrests by Livermore police.

While the Equity and Inclusion Working Group concluded back on June 15, 2021, this particular project was still underway and at the time, the council asked the police department and city staff to return upon the project's completion to share the results.

The researchers examined 22,737 traffic stops and 24,065 police and civilian encounters over the course of the 26-month period, according to a statement from LPD.

In the analysis of LPD traffic stops, two benchmarks were used as comparison points. The first benchmark was a “veil of darkness” (VOD) analysis that examined differences in stop rates of non-white and white drivers during the daytime compared to the nighttime. Possible racial bias is suggested when there’s a higher rate of non-white stops during daylight hours when race and ethnicity are more visible to the officers.

The second benchmark used vehicle crash data from an external State of California database and looked at the racial composition of not-at-fault and at-fault drivers involved in two-vehicle crashes.

For arrest analysis, the study examined whether civilian race/ethnicity predicted the likelihood of an arrest by Livermore Police after measuring other relevant factors such as encounter, civilian and officer characteristics.

The report indicated that there was no statistical difference between white and Black civilians in their likelihood of arrest and that Hispanic, Asian and "other" ethnic groups were less likely to be arrested compared to white civilians.

Another key finding from the report indicated that together, the results from the two benchmark analyses do not show a pattern of disparity in traffic stops based on driver race or ethnicity.

While the outcome of the analysis was positive, LPD Chief Jeramy Young said that continuing to review data is something he intends to carry forward.

"When we went into this project, I went in not knowing really what would happen. I thought that I knew what would happen because I know the quality of officers and community that we have and so, I wasn't surprised by the result but I was also prepared to deal with any issues that (the research team) found," Young said, adding that he sees value in data and that it's important to reflect to make sure the department is being the best it can be.

Toward the end of the discussion, all of the councilmembers expressed appreciation to the consultants, the police department and to Young for their work on this project. They also commended the department for demonstrating quality policing as reflected in the results of the report.

A complete recording of the Feb. 14 City Council meeting is available here.

Comments

MichaelB
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Feb 17, 2022 at 7:27 am
MichaelB, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Feb 17, 2022 at 7:27 am

""It's pretty incredible that our police force has acted in this unbiased way and that's not an easy thing to do and that's where the training and the commitment to acting well is pretty incredible and it's fantastic," said Mayor Bob Woerner upon hearing the report."

Here's the easy thing that was done that was anything but "inclusive". Have the Livermore mayor and city council members give credibility to/jump on the woke bandwagon of "systemic racism" in their own police department - because of what one officer with a history of misconduct accusations (Chauvin) did to George Floyd.


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