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Prop. 47 targeted by Dem, GOP lawmakers

A San Francisco police department vehicle stands in front of the Dyson store in Union Square on Nov. 24, 2021. Videos on social media showed masked people running with goods from several high-end retailers in the storied shopping area. (Photo by Samuel Rigelhaupt/Sipa USA)

Little did California voters know, when they approved a 2014 ballot measure that reduced penalties for certain theft offenses, that their decision would still be making headlines in 2022.

On Tuesday, Democratic Assemblymember Rudy Salas of Bakersfield introduced a bill that, if passed by state lawmakers and a majority of voters, would reverse a key aspect of Prop. 47 by moving the felony threshold for petty theft and shoplifting from $950 back to $400.

Salas said, “Enough is enough, we need to fight back against the criminals who are stealing from our communities. We have seen the unintended consequences of Prop. 47’s weakening of our theft laws and I believe California voters are ready to make their voices heard on this issue again.”

Salas’ statement sharply contrasts with those from prominent Democrats including Gov. Gavin Newsom and Attorney General Rob Bonta, who have repeatedly emphasized that Prop. 47 has nothing to do with California’s surge in smash-and-grab robberies. But it could help Salas, who’s running for the U.S. House of Representatives seat currently held by Republican David Valadao, court GOP voters — many of whom blame Prop. 47 for the uptick in organized retail crime.

Indeed, a few hours after Salas unveiled his bill, a group of Republican state lawmakers — including Assemblymembers Kevin Kiley of Rocklin, James Gallagher of Yuba City and James Patterson of Fresno — introduced a proposal to repeal Prop. 47 altogether.

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Other issues addressed this week include:

* A bill from Democratic Assemblymembers Phil Ting of San Francisco, Chris Ward of San Diego and Mike Gipson of Gardena that would make it easier for gun violence victims to sue firearm companies that behave “recklessly, negligently or irresponsibly.” The proposal would effectively remove a loophole in a 2005 federal law that shields gun makers from responsibility when their products are used to commit crimes.

* Gipson plans to introduce a bill that would allow any Californian to file a private lawsuit against anyone who makes or sells “assault weapons” and ghost gun kits in the state. If that sounds familiar, it’s because Newsom pitched the idea in December as a way to clap back at the U.S. Supreme Court letting stand a similarly structured Texas law that bans abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy.

* Another controversial bill appears to be dead for the year: Democratic state Sen. Scott Wiener of San Francisco on Tuesday shelved a proposal that would have banned some types of surgeries on intersex children until age 12, when they’re considered old enough to participate in the decision.

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— Emily Hoeven

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Prop. 47 targeted by Dem, GOP lawmakers

Uploaded: Sat, Jan 8, 2022, 2:34 pm
Updated: Sun, Jan 9, 2022, 3:21 pm

Little did California voters know, when they approved a 2014 ballot measure that reduced penalties for certain theft offenses, that their decision would still be making headlines in 2022.

On Tuesday, Democratic Assemblymember Rudy Salas of Bakersfield introduced a bill that, if passed by state lawmakers and a majority of voters, would reverse a key aspect of Prop. 47 by moving the felony threshold for petty theft and shoplifting from $950 back to $400.

Salas said, “Enough is enough, we need to fight back against the criminals who are stealing from our communities. We have seen the unintended consequences of Prop. 47’s weakening of our theft laws and I believe California voters are ready to make their voices heard on this issue again.”

Salas’ statement sharply contrasts with those from prominent Democrats including Gov. Gavin Newsom and Attorney General Rob Bonta, who have repeatedly emphasized that Prop. 47 has nothing to do with California’s surge in smash-and-grab robberies. But it could help Salas, who’s running for the U.S. House of Representatives seat currently held by Republican David Valadao, court GOP voters — many of whom blame Prop. 47 for the uptick in organized retail crime.

Indeed, a few hours after Salas unveiled his bill, a group of Republican state lawmakers — including Assemblymembers Kevin Kiley of Rocklin, James Gallagher of Yuba City and James Patterson of Fresno — introduced a proposal to repeal Prop. 47 altogether.

Other issues addressed this week include:

* A bill from Democratic Assemblymembers Phil Ting of San Francisco, Chris Ward of San Diego and Mike Gipson of Gardena that would make it easier for gun violence victims to sue firearm companies that behave “recklessly, negligently or irresponsibly.” The proposal would effectively remove a loophole in a 2005 federal law that shields gun makers from responsibility when their products are used to commit crimes.

* Gipson plans to introduce a bill that would allow any Californian to file a private lawsuit against anyone who makes or sells “assault weapons” and ghost gun kits in the state. If that sounds familiar, it’s because Newsom pitched the idea in December as a way to clap back at the U.S. Supreme Court letting stand a similarly structured Texas law that bans abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy.

* Another controversial bill appears to be dead for the year: Democratic state Sen. Scott Wiener of San Francisco on Tuesday shelved a proposal that would have banned some types of surgeries on intersex children until age 12, when they’re considered old enough to participate in the decision.

— Emily Hoeven

Comments

Rich K.
Registered user
Birdland
on Jan 9, 2022 at 7:58 pm
Rich K., Birdland
Registered user
on Jan 9, 2022 at 7:58 pm

Were you really surprised that Prop 47 led to an increase in crime? If you keep voting for liberal politicians and feel-good propositions, you will keep getting the same results. Now that the crime has starting impacting the urban elitists, they are finally trying to reverse the mess they created.


Mr. Julius
Registered user
Downtown
on Jan 10, 2022 at 11:06 am
Mr. Julius, Downtown
Registered user
on Jan 10, 2022 at 11:06 am

The surge in crime was predictable. And since when are we allowing "intersex surgeries" on children under 12, let alone under 18??!! Criminal. Most children under 12 haven't even gone through puberty, and most not fully aware if they are straight (most children), confused (many), bisexuality, gay, or even asexual. Or gender dysphoria.

Now we foist the new fad of transgendered surgeries on children under 12? Have we lost our minds?


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