News

BART to increase electric vehicle charging ports at station parking lots

'There's an absolute need for more publicly accessible, easy charging'

The BART Board of Directors unanimously voted this month to approve tentative plans to expand access to electric vehicle charging ports at the transit agency's parking lots.

A BART train arrives at a station in the East Bay. (File photo by Ray Saint Germain/BCN Foundation)

BART currently has electric vehicle charging stations at its Warm Springs/South Fremont and Lafayette stations. The parking lots at BART's Milpitas and Berryessa/North San Jose stations, which are owned by the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, also have electric vehicle charging ports.

But with ownership of more vehicle parking lots than any other rail transit agency in the state, BART intends to place more charging ports throughout the system in anticipation of a market shift toward the increased use of electric vehicles.

"The assumption is that widespread EV adoption is one-to-five years out," BART sustainability project manager Monica Meagher told the board on Nov. 18. "When we see widespread adoption, there's an absolute need for more publicly accessible, easy charging; we heard that consistently from all external stakeholders."

BART received feedback on its electric vehicle charging expansion from more than a dozen outside groups, including transportation researchers at the University of California at Berkeley and UC Davis, environmental groups like the National Resources Defense Council and transportation and sustainability officials with the city of Oakland and Contra Costa County.

Help sustain the local news you depend on.

Your contribution matters. Become a member today.

Join

The city of Oakland's Department of Transportation signaled its support in a letter to the board, arguing that more electric vehicle charging stations are crucial in disadvantaged parts of the city such as the West Oakland, Fruitvale and Coliseum BART stations.

According to Oakland officials, the expansion of electric vehicle charging infrastructure will also help the city reach its target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the city by 56% by 2030.

BART officials are expected to begin development of an implementation plan for expanding the installation of charging stations and, ultimately, return to the board for final approval.

"Although we're still in the early stages of EV adoption, BART as a clean-energy leader is setting the framework for the future with this policy," BART Board President Mark Foley said in a statement. "If people need to drive themselves to a BART station, let's find ways to encourage them to do so in a zero-emission vehicle."

Stay informed

Get the latest local news and information sent straight to your inbox.

Stay informed

Get the latest local news and information sent straight to your inbox.

Looking for more Livermore stories? The Livermore Vine will be your new source of vital news and information. Sign up to be among the first to get our daily local news headlines sent to your inbox for free.

Follow PleasantonWeekly.com and the Pleasanton Weekly on Twitter @pleasantonnews, Facebook and on Instagram @pleasantonweekly for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Your support is vital to us continuing to bring you political news. Become a member today.

BART to increase electric vehicle charging ports at station parking lots

'There's an absolute need for more publicly accessible, easy charging'

by /

Uploaded: Sun, Nov 28, 2021, 3:35 pm

The BART Board of Directors unanimously voted this month to approve tentative plans to expand access to electric vehicle charging ports at the transit agency's parking lots.

BART currently has electric vehicle charging stations at its Warm Springs/South Fremont and Lafayette stations. The parking lots at BART's Milpitas and Berryessa/North San Jose stations, which are owned by the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, also have electric vehicle charging ports.

But with ownership of more vehicle parking lots than any other rail transit agency in the state, BART intends to place more charging ports throughout the system in anticipation of a market shift toward the increased use of electric vehicles.

"The assumption is that widespread EV adoption is one-to-five years out," BART sustainability project manager Monica Meagher told the board on Nov. 18. "When we see widespread adoption, there's an absolute need for more publicly accessible, easy charging; we heard that consistently from all external stakeholders."

BART received feedback on its electric vehicle charging expansion from more than a dozen outside groups, including transportation researchers at the University of California at Berkeley and UC Davis, environmental groups like the National Resources Defense Council and transportation and sustainability officials with the city of Oakland and Contra Costa County.

The city of Oakland's Department of Transportation signaled its support in a letter to the board, arguing that more electric vehicle charging stations are crucial in disadvantaged parts of the city such as the West Oakland, Fruitvale and Coliseum BART stations.

According to Oakland officials, the expansion of electric vehicle charging infrastructure will also help the city reach its target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the city by 56% by 2030.

BART officials are expected to begin development of an implementation plan for expanding the installation of charging stations and, ultimately, return to the board for final approval.

"Although we're still in the early stages of EV adoption, BART as a clean-energy leader is setting the framework for the future with this policy," BART Board President Mark Foley said in a statement. "If people need to drive themselves to a BART station, let's find ways to encourage them to do so in a zero-emission vehicle."

Comments

There are no comments yet. Please share yours below.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.