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Pleasanton: Council reviews suggested strategies for city's Climate Action Plan 2.0

Grid resilience, transportation among topics of climate action discussion

Two sets of primary and secondary actions recommended for addressing climate change in Pleasanton were presented to the Pleasanton City Council last week, giving residents an updated look at the city's proposed Climate Action Plan (CAP) 2.0.

Recommendations in CAP 2.0 include a set of 15 primary actions, and 10 secondary actions. City leaders, staff and stakeholders have suggested more than 150 actions since the draft's initial review last year, when work on the document began.

The final version of CAP 2.0 will include an itemization of the city's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and other local-level actions to combat climate change.

Staff said the most significant change based on outreach was existing building electrification, of which "concerns were raised regarding existing building electrification mandates" during that time.

"Given the concerns regarding regulatory aspects of this action that were daylighted throughout the outreach process, the action was modified to remove the regulatory components of this action," staff said. "The action now focuses on grid resilience, evaluation of existing buildings, municipal building electrification, voluntary and incentive-based community building electrification, outreach and education, and tracking progress toward electrification in Pleasanton."

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Though electrification throughout the entire city was supported, Councilmember Jack Balch said he wanted to ensure "grid reliability so that we're not encouraging residents to put in gas-powered, propane-powered or natural gas-powered backup generators."

"We need to continue to educate our public that an HVAC unit that uses heat pumps is not going to provide immediate heat," Balch said.

Mayor Karla Brown agreed that it was "really important with how consistent is that grid."

"I know I'm certainly thinking as a person how much reliance do I want on electricity when I can't maybe cook food or I couldn't keep my house or have hot water if everything's electric," Brown said. "We need to have electricity or you can't power anything in your home if we're off our natural gas reliability requirements."

During the public hearing, resident Sharon Piekarski said "we have only a very short window to prevent total catastrophe." Citing transportation as the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the city, Pierkarski said "encouraging alternative means of getting around is very important to achieve reduction goals."

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"That means it's vitally important to provide safe, convenient, active transportation options by implementing the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, the trans master plan and continuing to implement the city's complete streets program," Piekarski added.

Former councilmember Becky Dennis spoke about how housing, open space and transportation are just some of the local decisions that will be affected by climate change.

"All of those things are part of climate action and they can all be accounted for in the plan," Dennis said.

"Climate action and the management of emissions and the sequestration of carbon is really our growth management strategy for the future, and anything that the city of Pleasanton does to not only improve our quality of life through that process but monetize our success in that process will serve us really well. I have a feeling this issue is only going to get bigger, not smaller," she added.

Dennis also asked if the city is "planning to have any standards and requirements for people who are bringing new land-uses to our city, whatever they are, for mitigating their emissions so that we don't end up with more emissions than we have today."

"It seems to me that there's a dynamic there that we could use to also pay for some of those things that aren't on the main list right now, but actually could find us partners for even exceeding our goals in the future," Dennis added.

Jocelyn Combs, a former representative on the East Bay Regional Park District Board of Directors, said "There's nothing radical in the plan, just good commonsense proposals," and told the council that "this is your opportunity to lead us aggressively with greenhouse gas emission reductions for our city."

"In my letter to you, I suggested having staff as recommended by the committee take on more action items, front load the plan and sell carbon credits, do more research, mandate more, and suggest less," Combs said.

Combs added, "The infrastructure is done, the next frontier is our climate and environment. Be the climate action council for us, but mostly for the future."

Other proposed actions in the CAP 2.0 include developing a zero-emissions vehicle infrastructure plan, requiring bike parking and encouraging solar energy for new development, and establishing a food recycling program in order to decrease organic materials in landfills as well as reduce methane emissions.

City staff aim to bring the final CAP 2.0 document forward for final council approval early next year, according to the city website.

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Pleasanton: Council reviews suggested strategies for city's Climate Action Plan 2.0

Grid resilience, transportation among topics of climate action discussion

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Tue, Nov 9, 2021, 4:12 pm

Two sets of primary and secondary actions recommended for addressing climate change in Pleasanton were presented to the Pleasanton City Council last week, giving residents an updated look at the city's proposed Climate Action Plan (CAP) 2.0.

Recommendations in CAP 2.0 include a set of 15 primary actions, and 10 secondary actions. City leaders, staff and stakeholders have suggested more than 150 actions since the draft's initial review last year, when work on the document began.

The final version of CAP 2.0 will include an itemization of the city's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and other local-level actions to combat climate change.

Staff said the most significant change based on outreach was existing building electrification, of which "concerns were raised regarding existing building electrification mandates" during that time.

"Given the concerns regarding regulatory aspects of this action that were daylighted throughout the outreach process, the action was modified to remove the regulatory components of this action," staff said. "The action now focuses on grid resilience, evaluation of existing buildings, municipal building electrification, voluntary and incentive-based community building electrification, outreach and education, and tracking progress toward electrification in Pleasanton."

Though electrification throughout the entire city was supported, Councilmember Jack Balch said he wanted to ensure "grid reliability so that we're not encouraging residents to put in gas-powered, propane-powered or natural gas-powered backup generators."

"We need to continue to educate our public that an HVAC unit that uses heat pumps is not going to provide immediate heat," Balch said.

Mayor Karla Brown agreed that it was "really important with how consistent is that grid."

"I know I'm certainly thinking as a person how much reliance do I want on electricity when I can't maybe cook food or I couldn't keep my house or have hot water if everything's electric," Brown said. "We need to have electricity or you can't power anything in your home if we're off our natural gas reliability requirements."

During the public hearing, resident Sharon Piekarski said "we have only a very short window to prevent total catastrophe." Citing transportation as the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the city, Pierkarski said "encouraging alternative means of getting around is very important to achieve reduction goals."

"That means it's vitally important to provide safe, convenient, active transportation options by implementing the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, the trans master plan and continuing to implement the city's complete streets program," Piekarski added.

Former councilmember Becky Dennis spoke about how housing, open space and transportation are just some of the local decisions that will be affected by climate change.

"All of those things are part of climate action and they can all be accounted for in the plan," Dennis said.

"Climate action and the management of emissions and the sequestration of carbon is really our growth management strategy for the future, and anything that the city of Pleasanton does to not only improve our quality of life through that process but monetize our success in that process will serve us really well. I have a feeling this issue is only going to get bigger, not smaller," she added.

Dennis also asked if the city is "planning to have any standards and requirements for people who are bringing new land-uses to our city, whatever they are, for mitigating their emissions so that we don't end up with more emissions than we have today."

"It seems to me that there's a dynamic there that we could use to also pay for some of those things that aren't on the main list right now, but actually could find us partners for even exceeding our goals in the future," Dennis added.

Jocelyn Combs, a former representative on the East Bay Regional Park District Board of Directors, said "There's nothing radical in the plan, just good commonsense proposals," and told the council that "this is your opportunity to lead us aggressively with greenhouse gas emission reductions for our city."

"In my letter to you, I suggested having staff as recommended by the committee take on more action items, front load the plan and sell carbon credits, do more research, mandate more, and suggest less," Combs said.

Combs added, "The infrastructure is done, the next frontier is our climate and environment. Be the climate action council for us, but mostly for the future."

Other proposed actions in the CAP 2.0 include developing a zero-emissions vehicle infrastructure plan, requiring bike parking and encouraging solar energy for new development, and establishing a food recycling program in order to decrease organic materials in landfills as well as reduce methane emissions.

City staff aim to bring the final CAP 2.0 document forward for final council approval early next year, according to the city website.

Comments

buklau
Registered user
Avila
on Nov 9, 2021 at 4:29 pm
buklau, Avila
Registered user
on Nov 9, 2021 at 4:29 pm

San Francisco is covered in needles, homeless, feces, and trash yet it wants to "save the planet" and atmosphere.


MichaelB
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Nov 9, 2021 at 8:18 pm
MichaelB, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Nov 9, 2021 at 8:18 pm

""We need to continue to educate our public that an HVAC unit that uses heat pumps is not going to provide immediate heat," Balch said."

The standard response from the political left on this issue (and others). Do what you are told, use less, and/or do without.

How about educating the public that when the wind is not blowing/sun is not shining there is no "clean" energy being produced? Nothing "common sense" about more electrification plans either when residents are already told not to use/use less electricity during afternoons during summer days to avoid rolling blackouts. All of this to supposedly "save the planet"? Other nations such as China, India, and Russia aren't doing anything. We end up with higher energy prices, insufficient supply, and unreliable sources.


Jo
Registered user
Del Prado
on Nov 10, 2021 at 8:01 am
Jo, Del Prado
Registered user
on Nov 10, 2021 at 8:01 am

stop stack and pack would help


Margo
Registered user
Dublin
on Nov 10, 2021 at 9:17 am
Margo, Dublin
Registered user
on Nov 10, 2021 at 9:17 am

Regarding using less electricity and gas the practicality is that transportation to work for many using bycycle, or car pools is not possible. Useing less utilities between certain hours sounds workable for those who can be homeduring the
use hours. Not so workable for those needing to commute, and arriving home between 4-9pm, and those with families.


Rich Buckley
Registered user
Livermore
on Nov 10, 2021 at 9:42 am
Rich Buckley, Livermore
Registered user
on Nov 10, 2021 at 9:42 am

ATMOSHPHERIC SCIENCE TURNED ON ITS HEAD - Part 1 of 2

Clean up the narrative to match the science and weather. In one of the most important contributions the Atmospheric Science Department of LLNL could make, i.e., the distinction: Are we in global warming or global cooling?

Unfortunately their science narrative is out of sync with what we are experiencing, and has been for too long.

Web Link

This new emerging group of Atmospheric Scientists is composed of a highly respected subgroup of thought leaders in Atmospheric Science. Suddenly the old generation is precipitating downwards out of vogue and leaving a new group of highly respected thought leaders as beacons of the emerging reality. The reality of our weather is beginning to match with those atmospheric scientific papers that conclude we are going into a steeper earth cooling as ocean currents are slowed at the poles due to fresh water melting and then refreezing. What was heresy before that would get your career sidetracked, is becoming the new science backed by peer reviewed white papers predicting outcomes formerly labeled as aberrations.

Fresh water floats on Salt water forming natural density layers that are slow to remix into just salt water. The freezing temperature of fresh water is higher than salt water, meaning it will freeze first. After the quick melting of ice at the north pole we are being followed with even greater matter of environmental concern that refreezing of the surface floating fresh water is triggering a deeper ice age as a greater mass of fresh water ice seasonally returns over larger artic ocean surface area than before, and stops and/or slows ocean currents. Once the ocean currents are disrupted, slowed, or even stopped, the ice age cycle dramatically deepens through a cascading chain reaction of diminished water flow momentum. >>> Continued Part 2


Rich Buckley
Registered user
Livermore
on Nov 10, 2021 at 9:45 am
Rich Buckley, Livermore
Registered user
on Nov 10, 2021 at 9:45 am

ATMOSHPHERIC SCIENCE TURNED ON ITS HEAD - Part 2 of 2

At the same time, larger surface area, faster freezing fresh water creates incremental atmospheric cooling for more days of the year. And with it, out go the old atmospheric scientism-dogmas. LLNL atmospheric scientists have been under its past leadership, grouped under the old atmospheric Scientism-dogmas.... highly agendized and politically active ….see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil.... and that's no longer working…. worst still it’s now all too obvious to the rest of us.

The new dogma emerging flows .... The persistent aberrations are actually trends, Global Cooling is a worse environmental problem than Global Warming, Stop Atmospheric Geoengineering (Chemtrailing known toxins and nano bots, and stop HAARP-ing dead zones that pause normal atmospheric currents) until we educate the public truthfully so the public and trusting body of our scientific community understand. Once we understand what’s been done to us through full disclosure, we can choose to all act differently. This causes us to pause and reflect on what we have been doing and start realizing we better change, and stop playing a role quite the same as we have been for the past 20+ years. Otherwise we are going to kill hundreds of millions of the unprepared. Let's change.


Ptown Baseball Dad
Registered user
Birdland
on Nov 10, 2021 at 5:18 pm
Ptown Baseball Dad , Birdland
Registered user
on Nov 10, 2021 at 5:18 pm

Hmmm, how about this for starters-

Don’t allow Kaiser Air to base 737 jets at Livermore airport. If they are allowed, under a proposed 60 year lease, you can kiss air quality in the Tri-Valley goodbye. And noise pollution from those jets. Think it’s not true? Spend some time in a 10 mile radius of San Jose International Airport. There’s nothing like the smell of jet fuel raining down on you morning, noon and night.

So while some believe we’re at a point of critical mass (no we’re not) and need to de-carbon our entire economy, let’s start by blocking the 200,000 pound monsters that could soon be flying in and out of our wonderful valley.

Just say N O to Kaiser Air.


Joe V
Registered user
Birdland
on Nov 10, 2021 at 5:36 pm
Joe V, Birdland
Registered user
on Nov 10, 2021 at 5:36 pm

Agree, no 737 jets flying out of Livermore Airport.


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