News

Amazon buys large property for planned warehouse in East Pleasanton

Mayor says online retail giant's expansion plans will not affect east side plan

Site map including the 58.5-acre parcel recently purchased by Amazon for $75 million. (Image courtesy of city of Pleasanton)

Amazon recently acquired a large swath of undeveloped land in eastern Pleasanton for about $75 million and plans to open a distribution warehouse in the future, adding to the e-commerce retail giant's growing footprint in the Tri-Valley.

A ground-level view of the East Pleasanton site where Amazon recently acquired a swath of undeveloped land with plans to open a distribution warehouse in the future. (Photo by Jeremy Walsh)

Located near the corner of Stanley Boulevard and Valley Avenue, the 58.5-acre parcel zoned industrial is bordered by the Pleasanton Garbage Service, Cope Lake and several quarries to the north, with Shadow Cliff Lake directly south across Stanley.

Mayor Karla Brown told the Weekly in an interview on Thursday that the site is "designed and well-suited for an e-warehouse use."

"In addition, it helps to separate residential from the dangerous and dirty industrial uses of gravel mining, so I support the Amazon warehouse use in that site," Brown said.

Amazon representatives could not be reached for comment at the time this article was published.

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The site is completely within city limits as well as the urban growth boundary line, unlike the adjacent parcels to the east, and will not affect the East Pleasanton Specific Plan in any way, according to Brown.

Besides being next to the garbage transfer station, Brown said the site isn't suitable for building housing because it's "right next to the rock quarry so it's dirty, noisy."

"It's just a very small portion of the property and some of the least desirable parts," Brown said. "It backs up to Stanley Boulevard and the railroad tracks; this is not prime property."

The warehouse is likely to be a jobs center and source of tax revenue for the city, though Brown said she doesn't "know the numbers" yet.

"I'm pleased Amazon's coming forward," Brown added. "I appreciate the new jobs, the potential revenue from having jobs and businesses in Pleasanton. I think that's exciting."

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The warehouse isn't anticipated to significantly increase traffic; Brown said "it's not really creating a lot more traffic" and that trucks and vans will have several routes available routinely used by other delivery vehicles.

"The large trucks will come down Stanley, turn on Busch, or take Highway 84, hit Stanley, go down Valley to Busch Road," Brown said. "They're not cutting through neighborhoods, and the minivans are driving in Pleasanton already making product deliveries."

Two years ago Amazon moved into the former Circuit City warehouse in Livermore off I-580 near Vasco Road, which serves as the company's California Delivery Station. Amazon also has other warehouses and distribution centers in other East Bay cities including Hayward, Dublin and Milpitas.

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Amazon buys large property for planned warehouse in East Pleasanton

Mayor says online retail giant's expansion plans will not affect east side plan

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Thu, Sep 23, 2021, 10:33 pm
Updated: Fri, Oct 1, 2021, 1:26 pm

Amazon recently acquired a large swath of undeveloped land in eastern Pleasanton for about $75 million and plans to open a distribution warehouse in the future, adding to the e-commerce retail giant's growing footprint in the Tri-Valley.

Located near the corner of Stanley Boulevard and Valley Avenue, the 58.5-acre parcel zoned industrial is bordered by the Pleasanton Garbage Service, Cope Lake and several quarries to the north, with Shadow Cliff Lake directly south across Stanley.

Mayor Karla Brown told the Weekly in an interview on Thursday that the site is "designed and well-suited for an e-warehouse use."

"In addition, it helps to separate residential from the dangerous and dirty industrial uses of gravel mining, so I support the Amazon warehouse use in that site," Brown said.

Amazon representatives could not be reached for comment at the time this article was published.

The site is completely within city limits as well as the urban growth boundary line, unlike the adjacent parcels to the east, and will not affect the East Pleasanton Specific Plan in any way, according to Brown.

Besides being next to the garbage transfer station, Brown said the site isn't suitable for building housing because it's "right next to the rock quarry so it's dirty, noisy."

"It's just a very small portion of the property and some of the least desirable parts," Brown said. "It backs up to Stanley Boulevard and the railroad tracks; this is not prime property."

The warehouse is likely to be a jobs center and source of tax revenue for the city, though Brown said she doesn't "know the numbers" yet.

"I'm pleased Amazon's coming forward," Brown added. "I appreciate the new jobs, the potential revenue from having jobs and businesses in Pleasanton. I think that's exciting."

The warehouse isn't anticipated to significantly increase traffic; Brown said "it's not really creating a lot more traffic" and that trucks and vans will have several routes available routinely used by other delivery vehicles.

"The large trucks will come down Stanley, turn on Busch, or take Highway 84, hit Stanley, go down Valley to Busch Road," Brown said. "They're not cutting through neighborhoods, and the minivans are driving in Pleasanton already making product deliveries."

Two years ago Amazon moved into the former Circuit City warehouse in Livermore off I-580 near Vasco Road, which serves as the company's California Delivery Station. Amazon also has other warehouses and distribution centers in other East Bay cities including Hayward, Dublin and Milpitas.

Comments

Fact Checker
Registered user
Downtown
on Sep 24, 2021 at 7:47 am
Fact Checker, Downtown
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 7:47 am

So let me get this straight…the Mayor is for building a 200,000 square feet warehouse off Valley but was opposed to building a 140,000 square foot Costco next to the freeway and sewer treatment plant? Fascinating.


Michael Austin
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Sep 24, 2021 at 8:19 am
Michael Austin , Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 8:19 am

The mayor was a member of the Pleasanton city council that unanimously approved the Costco build.


Becky Dennis
Registered user
Foxborough Estates
on Sep 24, 2021 at 8:55 am
Becky Dennis, Foxborough Estates
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 8:55 am

Amazon Corporate has pledged to become carbon neutral by 2040, and Pleasanton by 2045. How about partnering with them and a nonprofit to build affordable employee housing adjacent to their distribution center. This would eliminate vehicle emissions from their warehouse and delivery employees who would otherwise have to commute to work from distant locations with housing they can afford. Partnering of the Pleasanton and Amazon climate action plans would be a win-win and should be, IMHO, a plan approval requirement. I’m hopeful our Council will take this opportunity to do something environmentally innovative in East Pleasanton. Any thoughts?


Fact Checker
Registered user
Downtown
on Sep 24, 2021 at 9:27 am
Fact Checker, Downtown
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 9:27 am

Michael, the Mayor was a Yes on MM. Once the vote went the opposite, she said she had to follow the vote of the people. And yes she has supported the Costco since but she was in favor of the big box ban.


Jan Batcheller
Registered user
Downtown
on Sep 24, 2021 at 9:43 am
Jan Batcheller, Downtown
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 9:43 am

Becky Dennis, I like your idea very much. I, too, am hoping that Amazon will build some housing for Amazon employees


buklau
Registered user
Avila
on Sep 24, 2021 at 12:55 pm
buklau, Avila
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 12:55 pm

Jeff Bezos = corporate takeover

Worth $200 billion dollars. Owns the Washington Post. Now wants Amazon to buy Pleasanton land.
Google: "Biggest Owner Of Farmland" in usa. Hint: It's Bill Gates


Tom
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Sep 24, 2021 at 4:27 pm
Tom, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 4:27 pm

Mayor Brown quoted in the article: The warehouse isn't anticipated to significantly increase traffic; Brown said "it's not really creating a lot more traffic" and that trucks and vans will have several routes available routinely used by other delivery vehicles" Does this sound like a political fact? Not a real fact? All the transportation that a warehouse would create including large truck deliveries, employees cars, and additional outgoing delivery vans adds up to a lot of new traffic for this residential area.


AK
Registered user
Kottinger Ranch
on Sep 24, 2021 at 5:28 pm
AK, Kottinger Ranch
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 5:28 pm

I really hope city thinks thru before they allow Amazon warehouse in this neighborhood. They oppose big box stores, Costco - how can they allow this monstrosity? I am hoping they spend some more time and energy to come up with creative solution to create jobs, tax revenue and still keep the city quiet and nice.


Michael Austin
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Sep 24, 2021 at 5:53 pm
Michael Austin , Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 5:53 pm

It is not likely this land purchase on Stanley Boulevard will impact you in Kottinger Ranch.


keeknlinda
Registered user
Vintage Hills
on Sep 24, 2021 at 6:16 pm
keeknlinda, Vintage Hills
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 6:16 pm

@Michael Austin: Depending on what the traffic generation is, it could affect Kottinger Ranch folks. Stanley Blvd and Valley Ave. are the main arteries for KR and others to get in and out of our neighborhoods. Unless El Charro and Busch Road get some improvements (rather major ones, I expect)there will be a definite traffic impact.
Mayor Brown didn't think of that when she made her early remarks. We hope there will be lots of discussion, information, and careful thought on the part of city staff and council before anything is approved. It is yet early in the game.


Michael Austin
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Sep 24, 2021 at 7:15 pm
Michael Austin , Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 7:15 pm

I owned a home in that neighborhood 25 years ago. Bernal and Vineyard were the main arteries. Never used Stanley or Valley.


Joe V
Registered user
Birdland
on Sep 24, 2021 at 8:54 pm
Joe V, Birdland
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 8:54 pm

I vote no on the location for this distribution center. That area is already impacted, the added traffic will bring that area of Valley to a bumper to bumper situation all day, and would be horrific during commute hours.


Becky Dennis
Registered user
Foxborough Estates
on Sep 24, 2021 at 10:55 pm
Becky Dennis, Foxborough Estates
Registered user
on Sep 24, 2021 at 10:55 pm

Thank you Jan Batcheller. So good to know you see the opportunity & need.


Joe V
Registered user
Birdland
on Sep 25, 2021 at 5:32 am
Joe V, Birdland
Registered user
on Sep 25, 2021 at 5:32 am

Let's be real, right now the wages paid at Amazon distribution centers isn't enough to afford living in Pleasanton, including renting. It will require most employees to commute to the facility.
I'm sure there are currently more than enough people that need affordable housing in our city, let's take care of them, before we add others. This project will bring gridlock traffic to our city, don't think it won't effect you, unless you don't drive.


Matt Sullivan
Registered user
Stoneridge
on Sep 25, 2021 at 9:04 am
Matt Sullivan, Stoneridge
Registered user
on Sep 25, 2021 at 9:04 am

Amazon is the worst corporation on the planet: exploitative of their labor force, incredibly environmentally unsustainable, destructive of small businesses, and have way too much monopoly power over the economy. But our city mothers and fathers will welcome it if they think there's buck in it for them. But then we will be complicit in Amazon's destructive crusade.

Do some research to find out how bad this company is and how bad it will be for Pleasanton.
Web Link


keeknlinda
Registered user
Vintage Hills
on Sep 25, 2021 at 10:09 am
keeknlinda, Vintage Hills
Registered user
on Sep 25, 2021 at 10:09 am

Mr. Sullivan: At least it doesn't have a history of suing the city at every turn.


John
Registered user
Birdland
on Sep 25, 2021 at 12:01 pm
John, Birdland
Registered user
on Sep 25, 2021 at 12:01 pm

MS It is the american population buying all of the cheap chinese products produced in really poor working conditions in China. Amazon is just a facilitator satisfying the american demand for junk. By the way they pay more than local businesses.


Flightops
Registered user
Downtown
on Sep 25, 2021 at 4:13 pm
Flightops, Downtown
Registered user
on Sep 25, 2021 at 4:13 pm

How about building a Costco type gas station alongside that Amazon building to catch motorists on the east side of Pleasanton and the new Costco will take care of everybody else on the west side of Ptown thereby driving a nail in the coffin of MS’s band of “concerned citizens” who shall still remain nameless and the big check writer trying to save their overpriced gas stations!!


MichaelB
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Sep 25, 2021 at 5:19 pm
MichaelB, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Sep 25, 2021 at 5:19 pm

"But then we will be complicit in Amazon's destructive crusade."

Speaking of destructive crusades, it's the elitist and micromanaging "carbon neutral" and "climate action plan" stuff.

Amazing that people think the taxes/fees/mandates that activists and politicians want to impose on businesses/residents to supposedly "save the world" (it won't, because it is not going to end) somehow will not negatively affect jobs, economic growth, cost of living, and quality of life. The state already wants more electricity usage for cars/buildings/homes but can't produce enough of it with renewables. Telling businesses/residents to "use less" or "do without" isn't a solution.

More businesses/jobs/residents will just go to other states where the government isn't as controlling and openly hostile to them as this one is.


Diskman
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Sep 27, 2021 at 10:06 am
Diskman, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 27, 2021 at 10:06 am

Anyone want to guess how long it will be before Amazon pushes for the completion of El Charro Road from I-580 to Stanley Blvd, giving them easy access to I-580? Who would pay for that road - Pleasanton taxpayers, Alameda County taxpayers, or Amazon? The resulting cut-through traffic would be a royal pain in the posterior for folks in Pleasanton (and perhaps Livermore).


Mike
Registered user
Val Vista
on Sep 28, 2021 at 5:09 pm
Mike, Val Vista
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2021 at 5:09 pm

The Republican bent on slow, and zero growth has brought us to this point in society. There are people that can afford to live and work in Pleasanton and there are excluded from living in Pleasanton because of economics and zero housing options. Why does this city keep electing people that lie to the public? Zero growth and low growth are terrible for all of us. It costs us significantly more because employees cost more so prices must go up to meet that cost. It also impacts our environment because commuting to Pleasanton means more emissions and significantly more waste. Why can't we get a city council that will stand up for human beings? Stop telling the lie about low-income housing and crime? Or at least state the truth that low-income housing DOES NOT bring crime. Lack of housing and ZERO jobs brings crime.
Our city council has it backwards. Yes, we need to secure water but that cannot be the only excuse to stop building and limiting housing options. Support low income and high-density housing. That is the way of the future.


Becky Dennis
Registered user
Foxborough Estates
on Sep 28, 2021 at 6:02 pm
Becky Dennis, Foxborough Estates
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2021 at 6:02 pm

I think Mike is right. According to the 2010 Census, over 75% of people who commute to work in Pleasanton live in more affordable communities outside the Tri-Valley., up from 36% in 1990. I’m betting the numbers from the latest Census will be even higher. All the greenhouse gasses emitted in the process represent wasted time, energy, and resources. Today only about 5000 employed Pleasanton residents work in Pleasanton. This lack of essential service worker availability is something local businesses say is problematic and expensive for them. The solution? Nonprofit, affordable housing for essential and service workers making 60% of our Area Median Income. High density housing serving our local workforce can be architecturally lovely and a win-win Pleasanton could be proud of.


Sammy
Registered user
Del Prado
on Sep 28, 2021 at 7:39 pm
Sammy, Del Prado
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2021 at 7:39 pm

What does e-warehouse mean? Typically large corporations that bid for a location have data on projected vehicle traffic. Exactly what is that over next x years? I hope the city officials are able to gain some leverage to mandate minimum wages per employee (which automatically implies that the warehouse performs higher end jobs and functions) to let large corporations setup shop here. To me, it seems like information is missing for residents to form an opinion about this. A dedicated town-hall on this by the Mayor would be useful. If Switzerland can thrive on precision manufacturing, I am sure that Pleasanton can thrive on an warehouse that is futuristic; we have right to know what Amazon is thinking.


keeknlinda
Registered user
Vintage Hills
on Sep 29, 2021 at 1:37 am
keeknlinda, Vintage Hills
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2021 at 1:37 am

Much of the high density housing we've seen to date is far less than aesthetically pleasing. Of course, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but a drive through some such housing in both Livermore and Dublin feels downright oppressive. High-rise buildings on either side of relatively narrow streets can leave one with the feeling of running a gauntlet and hoping to come out safely on the other side.

Sammy is correct in recognizing we don't know enough about the proposed use of the properties as yet. We need to make certain our elected officials don't choose to rubber-stamp proposals just because Amazon is Amazon. We must make them require hard questions and answers from city staff, in-depth explanations of all phases of the work to be done, and dig deep into the future traffic and neighborhood impact results of any proposed project.

Since the city relenquished the opportunity to plan because some elected officials viewed it as unimportant, we are now faced with land that will of necessity be used less cohesively than it might have been.


Rich Buckley
Registered user
Livermore
on Sep 29, 2021 at 9:59 am
Rich Buckley, Livermore
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2021 at 9:59 am

It ain't a deal till it's a deal. A weakness in the Amazon-Goliath is urbanized area costs to actually obtain a use permit to operate.

Resist to the point of extracting a compromise, not a piddly compromise but a relevant compromise. What if all truck traffic coming to this facility shared a common problem with all other urbanized Amazon Distribution Centers? Amazon plans big. Pleasanton won't be the only urbanized distribution center. If they plan one, they are planning many dozens.

What if so many off-site mitigation costs are associated with their running 18-Wheelers in and out of the urbanized distribution centers, Amazon agreed to downsize their 18-Wheelers to smaller, quieter, cleaner, trucks and their in-and-out hours of operation?

No?

Okay, let's mitigate some of the obvious traffic issues at the four major intersections that will be used by their 18-Wheelers. (1) 580 - Isabelle (2) Isabelle - Stanley (3) Stanley - Valley (4) Valley - Bush Road. $100 to $200 million off-site mitigation impacts at each of their urbanized distribution centers looming at Amazon Corporate, makes agreeing to smaller, cleaner, quieter trucks an alternative, along with specified routes on Stanley only, and heavily restricted hours of delivery.




Michael Austin
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Sep 29, 2021 at 4:58 pm
Michael Austin , Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2021 at 4:58 pm

Maybe this Amazon warehouse will be a drone operation.
Packages come in by drone, get sorted, go out by drone.

As a company, Amazon produces 51.17 million tons of carbon dioxide year.

As a country, China produces 99 million tons of carbon dioxide year.


Tom
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Sep 29, 2021 at 7:58 pm
Tom, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2021 at 7:58 pm

Hey Mike,
I am confused when you make reference to Republicans. Last I checked Democrats dominate the policies of this state. You mention controlled growth due to water problems, it seems water is a real problem in the whole state of California, check with who runs this state. I can't agree with the high-density housing, would suggest you take a ride into Dublin and see how that overcrowded and over-developed city is working out. Wait not even enough schools for their overbuilt housing? We are so lucky to live in Pleasanton with its great open spaces and parks. On the topic, I agree a lot more to consider before allowing Amazon in our residential area. Perhaps Hacienda business park fits their needs and ours.


MsVic
Registered user
Mission Park
on Sep 30, 2021 at 10:57 am
MsVic, Mission Park
Registered user
on Sep 30, 2021 at 10:57 am

Ask your mayor what happened to East Side Plan - she was completely against developing East side with homes that would meet RHNA requirements. Now Amazon has purchased land - creating many more jobs and what happens -RHNA numbers will go up again. Our mayor doesn’t have the vision for future that is needed.


John
Registered user
Birdland
on Sep 30, 2021 at 12:21 pm
John, Birdland
Registered user
on Sep 30, 2021 at 12:21 pm


china co2 footprint is roughly 10 Billion a year while US is roughly 5 Billion a year


Michael Austin
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Sep 30, 2021 at 12:41 pm
Michael Austin , Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Sep 30, 2021 at 12:41 pm

John,
You are correct.


Kevin
Registered user
Castlewood
on Oct 1, 2021 at 9:32 pm
Kevin, Castlewood
Registered user
on Oct 1, 2021 at 9:32 pm

(Removed) we need more housing for our police and teachers.


Tim
Registered user
Livermore
on Oct 7, 2021 at 8:15 am
Tim, Livermore
Registered user
on Oct 7, 2021 at 8:15 am

The link thru el charro to 580 is what attracted Amazon to this site. Nothing thing else. Look for massive truck traffic to compete with the outlet traffic on el charro. Good luck with that.

If they wanted access to Isabel/84 they would have bought the large parcel south of the Livermore airport.


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