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Livermore Reads Together: John Lewis' 'March'

Community invited to events focused on graphic novel series

Three volumes of "March," the current choice for Livermore Reads Together, detail the life journey of civil rights champion John Lewis.

Livermore Reads Together, a community reading program, is currently featuring the powerful graphic novel series "March," late U.S. Rep. John Lewis' first-hand story co-written by Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell.

The community is invited to read all three volumes of "March" and participate in related programs and virtual events, which kick off at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 1 with a Zoom panel conversation on racism. The next evening, co-author Aydin and illustrator Powell will join a library discussion at 6 p.m.

Events will include a virtual screening of the documentary "John Lewis: Good Trouble," a presentation by Livermore Shakespeare Festival volunteers, and a special LRT-themed poetry event featuring Livermore Poet Laureate Cynthia J. Patton and guests.

Additional programs include a Black Lives Matter sign-making craft for youths and teens, and a discussion by artist, author and researcher Danièle Archambault on the history and importance of graphic novels. There will also be a virtual film screening of "Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools."

Details are available on the library's events calendar at www.livermorelibrary.net or call 373-5505.

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The Livermore Public Library has copies of all three volumes of "March" available through its curbside pickup service as well as eBook copies to download.

Lewis, who represented Georgia's 5th Congressional District, was one of the key figures of the civil rights movement, whose commitment to justice and nonviolence took him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress. To share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis created "March," which also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.

Livermore Reads Together 2021 is sponsored by the Friends of the Livermore Public Library.

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Livermore Reads Together: John Lewis' 'March'

Community invited to events focused on graphic novel series

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Sun, Jan 24, 2021, 4:18 pm

Livermore Reads Together, a community reading program, is currently featuring the powerful graphic novel series "March," late U.S. Rep. John Lewis' first-hand story co-written by Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell.

The community is invited to read all three volumes of "March" and participate in related programs and virtual events, which kick off at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 1 with a Zoom panel conversation on racism. The next evening, co-author Aydin and illustrator Powell will join a library discussion at 6 p.m.

Events will include a virtual screening of the documentary "John Lewis: Good Trouble," a presentation by Livermore Shakespeare Festival volunteers, and a special LRT-themed poetry event featuring Livermore Poet Laureate Cynthia J. Patton and guests.

Additional programs include a Black Lives Matter sign-making craft for youths and teens, and a discussion by artist, author and researcher Danièle Archambault on the history and importance of graphic novels. There will also be a virtual film screening of "Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools."

Details are available on the library's events calendar at www.livermorelibrary.net or call 373-5505.

The Livermore Public Library has copies of all three volumes of "March" available through its curbside pickup service as well as eBook copies to download.

Lewis, who represented Georgia's 5th Congressional District, was one of the key figures of the civil rights movement, whose commitment to justice and nonviolence took him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress. To share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis created "March," which also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.

Livermore Reads Together 2021 is sponsored by the Friends of the Livermore Public Library.

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