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Tri-Valley's county supervisors Haubert and Miley take oath of office

Newcomer Haubert starts first term for D1; Miley's sixth term underway for D4

Former Dublin mayor David Haubert stepped into his new role as Alameda County District 1 supervisor while District 4 Supervisor Nate Miley was sworn in for a sixth term during separate socially distanced ceremonies last week.

New Alameda County District 1 Supervisor David Haubert (right) took the oath of office during a Jan. 3 ceremony. (Courtesy image)

The Jan. 3 event for Haubert was introduced by Tim Sbranti, current trustee for the Chabot-Las Positas Community College District and also a past mayor of Dublin, while Cornerstone Fellowship Church Senior Pastor Steve Madsen delivered the invocation during the ceremony, which was remote in nature due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Haubert, who defeated Fremont City Councilman Vinnie Bacon in a runoff election Nov. 3, succeeded outgoing Supervisor Scott Haggerty, who retired from public service this month after 24 years on the board. District 1 encompasses Dublin, Livermore, part of Sunol, and most of Fremont and unincorporated Livermore-Amador Valley.

Sbranti mentioned Haubert's commitment to serving his community and his family and faith as his foundation. He also highlighted Haubert's decade on the Dublin school board before moving on to the Dublin City Council and serving three mayoral terms from 2014 through last month.

Haubert's wife Michele stood by his side while he took the oath of office, which was administered by Haggerty. Haubert's daughter Katelyn also made a virtual appearance earlier during the ceremony -- which was broadcast via TV30 and held on a Sunday, two days before the regular Board of Supervisors meeting.

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Haggerty recalled his time working with Haubert on multi-jurisdictional issues, and noted that Haubert's start in public service in the Tri-Valley "did start with a county issue," when plans were floated to build one of the nation's largest juvenile detention centers in Dublin.

Instead of a punitive approach, Haggerty said that Haubert advocated for alternative treatment and rehabilitation programs.

At one point, Haggerty admitted it was difficult deciding to not run again and highlighted some projects and accomplishments he was proud of, including the Valley Link project. He also shared his desire to be involved in celebrating the purchase of the N3 Ranch property.

Later on, Haubert stepped up to the lectern, where he called the occasion that evening and what it represented, "special."

"That's a special thing in America, that ordinary everyday people step up to the plate, run for office and take an oath to serve our community," Haubert said.

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"You deserve a leader who will listen to you ... and I promise to hear your needs and concerns," Haubert added. "I promise to have an open mind as I listen to you, and I promise to advocate for you. Our job, my job is to make your life better, and I promise to do that to the best of my ability."

On Jan. 5, Miley was sworn in at the first board meeting of 2021 for a sixth term representing District 4, which includes Pleasanton, Castro Valley, and parts of Oakland and unincorporated Alameda County. Miley was first elected to the board nearly 20 years ago and won re-election in the March primary against lone challenger Esther Goolsby.

Alameda County District 4 Supervisor Nate Miley was sworn in for a sixth term at the Jan. 5 Board meeting. (Courtesy image)

Miley took the oath of office, administered by county Auditor-Controller Melissa Wilk, inside the board chambers in Oakland. Everyone present at the socially distanced ceremony also wore face masks.

Reflecting on challenges over the past year that "have been unlike any others in my 30 years as an elected official," Miley said the COVID-19 crisis has "amplified the deep structural inequities in many of the communities that I represent," but there is still long-term investment needed to achieve social and economic equity long after the pandemic.

Touching on obstacles ahead, Miley added, "In this turmoil, there's hope for change and the truth that we have more power personally and collectively than we may believe right now."

Miley finished, "I find myself encouraged by the words of Barack Obama when he said, 'Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time -- we are the ones we've been waiting for, we are the change we seek.'"

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Tri-Valley's county supervisors Haubert and Miley take oath of office

Newcomer Haubert starts first term for D1; Miley's sixth term underway for D4

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Mon, Jan 11, 2021, 5:40 pm

Former Dublin mayor David Haubert stepped into his new role as Alameda County District 1 supervisor while District 4 Supervisor Nate Miley was sworn in for a sixth term during separate socially distanced ceremonies last week.

The Jan. 3 event for Haubert was introduced by Tim Sbranti, current trustee for the Chabot-Las Positas Community College District and also a past mayor of Dublin, while Cornerstone Fellowship Church Senior Pastor Steve Madsen delivered the invocation during the ceremony, which was remote in nature due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Haubert, who defeated Fremont City Councilman Vinnie Bacon in a runoff election Nov. 3, succeeded outgoing Supervisor Scott Haggerty, who retired from public service this month after 24 years on the board. District 1 encompasses Dublin, Livermore, part of Sunol, and most of Fremont and unincorporated Livermore-Amador Valley.

Sbranti mentioned Haubert's commitment to serving his community and his family and faith as his foundation. He also highlighted Haubert's decade on the Dublin school board before moving on to the Dublin City Council and serving three mayoral terms from 2014 through last month.

Haubert's wife Michele stood by his side while he took the oath of office, which was administered by Haggerty. Haubert's daughter Katelyn also made a virtual appearance earlier during the ceremony -- which was broadcast via TV30 and held on a Sunday, two days before the regular Board of Supervisors meeting.

Haggerty recalled his time working with Haubert on multi-jurisdictional issues, and noted that Haubert's start in public service in the Tri-Valley "did start with a county issue," when plans were floated to build one of the nation's largest juvenile detention centers in Dublin.

Instead of a punitive approach, Haggerty said that Haubert advocated for alternative treatment and rehabilitation programs.

At one point, Haggerty admitted it was difficult deciding to not run again and highlighted some projects and accomplishments he was proud of, including the Valley Link project. He also shared his desire to be involved in celebrating the purchase of the N3 Ranch property.

Later on, Haubert stepped up to the lectern, where he called the occasion that evening and what it represented, "special."

"That's a special thing in America, that ordinary everyday people step up to the plate, run for office and take an oath to serve our community," Haubert said.

"You deserve a leader who will listen to you ... and I promise to hear your needs and concerns," Haubert added. "I promise to have an open mind as I listen to you, and I promise to advocate for you. Our job, my job is to make your life better, and I promise to do that to the best of my ability."

On Jan. 5, Miley was sworn in at the first board meeting of 2021 for a sixth term representing District 4, which includes Pleasanton, Castro Valley, and parts of Oakland and unincorporated Alameda County. Miley was first elected to the board nearly 20 years ago and won re-election in the March primary against lone challenger Esther Goolsby.

Miley took the oath of office, administered by county Auditor-Controller Melissa Wilk, inside the board chambers in Oakland. Everyone present at the socially distanced ceremony also wore face masks.

Reflecting on challenges over the past year that "have been unlike any others in my 30 years as an elected official," Miley said the COVID-19 crisis has "amplified the deep structural inequities in many of the communities that I represent," but there is still long-term investment needed to achieve social and economic equity long after the pandemic.

Touching on obstacles ahead, Miley added, "In this turmoil, there's hope for change and the truth that we have more power personally and collectively than we may believe right now."

Miley finished, "I find myself encouraged by the words of Barack Obama when he said, 'Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time -- we are the ones we've been waiting for, we are the change we seek.'"

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