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Livermore: Presenting science through performance

Shakespeare Festival contributing to global narrative on pandemic, climate change

The Livermore Shakespeare Festival has launched a program, "Science at Play," to bring the scientific process to life through literature and performance. It begins with live-streamed productions of known science-related plays. (Contributed photo)

The Livermore Shakespeare Festival has launched a program, "Science at Play," to bring the scientific process to life through literature and performance. It begins with live-streamed productions of known science-related plays, including David Auburn's "Proof" and Michael Frayne's "Copenhagen."

The festival has also commissioned playwright Diana Burbano to write a new play to educate the public about the COVID-19 crisis, how science is helping develop a vaccine, and about climate change.

"With the uncertainty of live gatherings still looming, this is a moment for arts organizations to enlighten their audiences and contribute to a global narrative by showcasing the minds and spirits of the folks in the middle of today's scientific breakthroughs," said Lisa A. Tromovitch, founding artistic director of Livermore Shakespeare Festival.

In writing the play, Burbano will partner with scientists at Lawrence Livermore and Sandia national laboratories who are engaged in using science and data to develop a vaccine. The scientists also will give science-related talks and demonstrations for the public as part of the yearlong program.

Livermore Shakespeare Festival's resident director Michael Wayne Rice is leading the project, assisted by Tromovitch.

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"Art illuminates," Tromovitch said.

Burbano, a Colombian immigrant, is an Equity actor and a teaching artist at South Coast Repertory and Breath of Fire Latina Theatre Ensemble in Orange County. Her long list of writing credits includes "Policarpa," written for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

For more information, visit livermoreshakes.org/scienceatplay.

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Livermore: Presenting science through performance

Shakespeare Festival contributing to global narrative on pandemic, climate change

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Sun, Jan 3, 2021, 2:09 pm

The Livermore Shakespeare Festival has launched a program, "Science at Play," to bring the scientific process to life through literature and performance. It begins with live-streamed productions of known science-related plays, including David Auburn's "Proof" and Michael Frayne's "Copenhagen."

The festival has also commissioned playwright Diana Burbano to write a new play to educate the public about the COVID-19 crisis, how science is helping develop a vaccine, and about climate change.

"With the uncertainty of live gatherings still looming, this is a moment for arts organizations to enlighten their audiences and contribute to a global narrative by showcasing the minds and spirits of the folks in the middle of today's scientific breakthroughs," said Lisa A. Tromovitch, founding artistic director of Livermore Shakespeare Festival.

In writing the play, Burbano will partner with scientists at Lawrence Livermore and Sandia national laboratories who are engaged in using science and data to develop a vaccine. The scientists also will give science-related talks and demonstrations for the public as part of the yearlong program.

Livermore Shakespeare Festival's resident director Michael Wayne Rice is leading the project, assisted by Tromovitch.

"Art illuminates," Tromovitch said.

Burbano, a Colombian immigrant, is an Equity actor and a teaching artist at South Coast Repertory and Breath of Fire Latina Theatre Ensemble in Orange County. Her long list of writing credits includes "Policarpa," written for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

For more information, visit livermoreshakes.org/scienceatplay.

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