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Down to the wire: Measure W sales tax, Measure X fire bond ahead by slimmest of margins

Yes on Measure W back ahead at 50.08%; Yes on Measure X dips to 66.74%

The proposed half-cent county sales tax, Measure W, jumped back into a narrow lead days after slipping behind, while the Measure X fire bond kept clinging to its slight advantage, according to the newest election results from the Alameda County Registrar of Voters' Office on Thursday.

The current tally sees 357,238 votes (50.08%) in favor of Measure W compared to 356,116 votes (49.92%) against the measure that requires a simple majority to pass -- a margin of 1,112 votes.

Thursday's results update marked a turnaround for Measure W, which had led narrowly in all returns since the Nov. 3 election before slipping into a trailing position with last Tuesday's results update (50.07% No to 49.93% Yes). But the approximately 15,000 more ballots tabulated in the interim gave the lead back to the Yes side.

The results to date represent the vast majority of eligible ballots, but some small remaining amount of vote-by-mail, provisional and conditional ballots remain to be processed.

A proposal put on the ballot by the Alameda County Board of Supervisors, Measure W would establish a new half-cent sales tax countywide "to provide essential county services, including housing and services for those experiencing homelessness, mental health services, job training, social safety net and other general fund services," according to the ballot question.

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The new tax, which requires a simple majority to pass (50% plus one vote), would be in place for 10 years and generate an estimated $150 million per year.

The other tight local ballot measure in the county is Measure X, the Alameda County Fire Department's $90 million fire facilities bond proposal that was on the ballot in unincorporated communities, except for Fairview.

Needing approval from more than two-thirds of voters, Measure X stands just 0.07 percentage points ahead with 38,664 votes in favor (66.74%) and 19,264 votes against (33.26%).

It's a familiar case for ACFD, which saw the same $90 million bond measure in this year's primary election come down to the wire before ultimately falling 95 votes short of passing once all ballots were counted. The bond was on the March ballot as Measure D.

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Down to the wire: Measure W sales tax, Measure X fire bond ahead by slimmest of margins

Yes on Measure W back ahead at 50.08%; Yes on Measure X dips to 66.74%

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Sun, Nov 15, 2020, 10:01 pm

The proposed half-cent county sales tax, Measure W, jumped back into a narrow lead days after slipping behind, while the Measure X fire bond kept clinging to its slight advantage, according to the newest election results from the Alameda County Registrar of Voters' Office on Thursday.

The current tally sees 357,238 votes (50.08%) in favor of Measure W compared to 356,116 votes (49.92%) against the measure that requires a simple majority to pass -- a margin of 1,112 votes.

Thursday's results update marked a turnaround for Measure W, which had led narrowly in all returns since the Nov. 3 election before slipping into a trailing position with last Tuesday's results update (50.07% No to 49.93% Yes). But the approximately 15,000 more ballots tabulated in the interim gave the lead back to the Yes side.

The results to date represent the vast majority of eligible ballots, but some small remaining amount of vote-by-mail, provisional and conditional ballots remain to be processed.

A proposal put on the ballot by the Alameda County Board of Supervisors, Measure W would establish a new half-cent sales tax countywide "to provide essential county services, including housing and services for those experiencing homelessness, mental health services, job training, social safety net and other general fund services," according to the ballot question.

The new tax, which requires a simple majority to pass (50% plus one vote), would be in place for 10 years and generate an estimated $150 million per year.

The other tight local ballot measure in the county is Measure X, the Alameda County Fire Department's $90 million fire facilities bond proposal that was on the ballot in unincorporated communities, except for Fairview.

Needing approval from more than two-thirds of voters, Measure X stands just 0.07 percentage points ahead with 38,664 votes in favor (66.74%) and 19,264 votes against (33.26%).

It's a familiar case for ACFD, which saw the same $90 million bond measure in this year's primary election come down to the wire before ultimately falling 95 votes short of passing once all ballots were counted. The bond was on the March ballot as Measure D.

Comments

Nicki
Registered user
Jensen Tract
on Nov 16, 2020 at 2:10 pm
Nicki, Jensen Tract
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 2:10 pm
9 people like this

What is the determining factor if a new tax requires 50% plus one vote or two thirds approval to pass? I thought prop 13 settled all that years ago. That changed or am I missing something?
1978 California Proposition 13 - Wikipedia:
In addition to decreasing property taxes and changing the role of the state, Proposition 13 also contained language requiring a two-thirds (2/3) majority in both legislative houses for future increases of any state tax rates or amounts of revenue collected, including income tax rates and sales tax rates.


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