News

PUSD set to finalize distance learning plan

Board of Trustees will also hear school opening updates

Pleasanton Unified School District officials are scheduled to take a closer look at their state-mandated Learning Continuity Plan (LCP) and hear an update on school opening at the Board of Trustees online meeting Thursday night, starting 7 p.m.

The two separate items on the meeting agenda share some similarities: both relate directly to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and PUSD's response so far, and include future plans or considerations for students and staff in both remote and hybrid learning environments.

With the announcement of Alameda County moving on to the red tier of the state's color-coded coronavirus monitoring list this week, PUSD would no longer need to apply for a waiver to reopen in person learning. However, Pleasanton schools may not fully reopen until the county has been in the red for two weeks.

A staff report on school reopening planned for that evening states only a limited number of students in small cohorts will be allowed. The Alameda County Public Health Department has also indicated that approval for reopening will be withheld until a plan is in place to ensure safety for students and staff, including proper cleaning, staff testing and contact tracing, and triggers for switching classes or schools back to remote learning if needed.

According to documents, PUSD has adjusted the elementary school system for maximum fresh air intake and "is in the process to acquire and install MERV 13 filters."

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Child nutrition services staff also formulated plans to provide meals at elementary sites and pick up locations, while sneeze guard barriers and specialty delivery equipment still need to be purchased and installed.

The district is also working on "detailing student and staff movements to reduce gatherings and compliance with ACPHD recommendations."

The trustees are also expected to vote that evening on the final version of the LCP, which is used to measure and monitor how California school districts are supporting students and staff during distance learning, their plans going forward, and any potential learning loss due to the pandemic.

California Senate Bill 98, which passed into law this summer, outlines requirements during the 2020-21 school year for in-person and distance learning, and establishes the LCP in place of the Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP).

The district's current enrollment numbers, local unemployment rates, and the most recent rates of COVID cases in Pleasanton and Alameda County are also included in the seven-part continuity plan.

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Staff will discuss the district's remote learning model, the types of learning platforms used, professional development updates, and student resources for their mental health and social and emotional wellness.

PUSD gathered feedback from the community while staff wrote the plan, including conducting surveys, issuing regular online and TV updates, holding multiple steering committee, task force and community meetings, and supplementing communication with additional emails and phone calls.

If approved, the learning continuity plan will receive $6,444,568 total in mostly federal funds.

In other business

* Highlights from PUSD's various summer programs will be shared Thursday. Every year, the district offers multiple specialized summer programs for students at all grade levels, including K-12 enrichment courses and Extended School Year.

An overview of each program is included in a staff report, such as the tools and resources used, and also breaks down the demographics for each program by race, ethnicity, and school of origin.

According to the report, PUSD has "an overrepresentation of students who identify as male" in their Intervention Summer Programs (ISP). Last year, a full 60% of male-identifying students and 40% female-identifying students were enrolled in ISP; this year, just over 57% of male students and 42% of female students were enrolled.

The district said, "Data collection will take place over the 20-21 school year in an effort to better understand the potential causes and to gain insight into instructional and behavioral support strategies that will interrupt the pattern."

PUSD spent approximately $409,000 for the 2020 summer programs, using the General Fund, LCAP, Title I, special education, fees, and donations.

* The board will vote on additional work needed for the new Measure I1-funded portable classroom replacements and science labs at Foothill High on Tuesday night.

Last year, construction of a new classroom building within a sixty-foot clear area surrounding Building J on campus was approved by the Board. The Division of the State Architect (DSA) recently delivered some mandatory revisions to the project.

Among the required changes is upgrading the main entry door to meet Americans with Disabilities Act codes and requirements.

"Reviewing options with the principal and staff, relocating the front doors to the original location on the building closer to the parking lot was preferable and created a safer entrance," staff wrote in a report. "By coordinating the fencing and new building projects, the relocated front door location creates an obvious public main entrance to the campus office and integrated fencing to separate the public from student/staff areas."

The related scope of work includes adding ADA concrete landing upgrades, lighting and signage at the new front door, as well as making "interior walls, doors, HVAC, and fire alarm changes to accommodate door relocation and the displaced office where the door will be located."

Two existing rooftop HVAC units "that are beyond repair and were installed without DSA approvals" will also be replaced, requiring structural engineer analysis and detailing for state approval, as well as "campus entrance fence modifications to accommodate door relocation and fire truck access."

The relocation of the door and window at the existing science classroom in Building J is also required. Staff said, "By relocating the door and window, safety is increased by avoiding adding fencing between the building and drop off at a pinch point in the walkway."

The board is set to approve a $98,465 contract with HKIT Architects for the latest project revision, which will be funded by Measure I1 revenue.

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PUSD set to finalize distance learning plan

Board of Trustees will also hear school opening updates

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Sep 23, 2020, 10:53 pm

Pleasanton Unified School District officials are scheduled to take a closer look at their state-mandated Learning Continuity Plan (LCP) and hear an update on school opening at the Board of Trustees online meeting Thursday night, starting 7 p.m.

The two separate items on the meeting agenda share some similarities: both relate directly to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and PUSD's response so far, and include future plans or considerations for students and staff in both remote and hybrid learning environments.

With the announcement of Alameda County moving on to the red tier of the state's color-coded coronavirus monitoring list this week, PUSD would no longer need to apply for a waiver to reopen in person learning. However, Pleasanton schools may not fully reopen until the county has been in the red for two weeks.

A staff report on school reopening planned for that evening states only a limited number of students in small cohorts will be allowed. The Alameda County Public Health Department has also indicated that approval for reopening will be withheld until a plan is in place to ensure safety for students and staff, including proper cleaning, staff testing and contact tracing, and triggers for switching classes or schools back to remote learning if needed.

According to documents, PUSD has adjusted the elementary school system for maximum fresh air intake and "is in the process to acquire and install MERV 13 filters."

Child nutrition services staff also formulated plans to provide meals at elementary sites and pick up locations, while sneeze guard barriers and specialty delivery equipment still need to be purchased and installed.

The district is also working on "detailing student and staff movements to reduce gatherings and compliance with ACPHD recommendations."

The trustees are also expected to vote that evening on the final version of the LCP, which is used to measure and monitor how California school districts are supporting students and staff during distance learning, their plans going forward, and any potential learning loss due to the pandemic.

California Senate Bill 98, which passed into law this summer, outlines requirements during the 2020-21 school year for in-person and distance learning, and establishes the LCP in place of the Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP).

The district's current enrollment numbers, local unemployment rates, and the most recent rates of COVID cases in Pleasanton and Alameda County are also included in the seven-part continuity plan.

Staff will discuss the district's remote learning model, the types of learning platforms used, professional development updates, and student resources for their mental health and social and emotional wellness.

PUSD gathered feedback from the community while staff wrote the plan, including conducting surveys, issuing regular online and TV updates, holding multiple steering committee, task force and community meetings, and supplementing communication with additional emails and phone calls.

If approved, the learning continuity plan will receive $6,444,568 total in mostly federal funds.

In other business

* Highlights from PUSD's various summer programs will be shared Thursday. Every year, the district offers multiple specialized summer programs for students at all grade levels, including K-12 enrichment courses and Extended School Year.

An overview of each program is included in a staff report, such as the tools and resources used, and also breaks down the demographics for each program by race, ethnicity, and school of origin.

According to the report, PUSD has "an overrepresentation of students who identify as male" in their Intervention Summer Programs (ISP). Last year, a full 60% of male-identifying students and 40% female-identifying students were enrolled in ISP; this year, just over 57% of male students and 42% of female students were enrolled.

The district said, "Data collection will take place over the 20-21 school year in an effort to better understand the potential causes and to gain insight into instructional and behavioral support strategies that will interrupt the pattern."

PUSD spent approximately $409,000 for the 2020 summer programs, using the General Fund, LCAP, Title I, special education, fees, and donations.

* The board will vote on additional work needed for the new Measure I1-funded portable classroom replacements and science labs at Foothill High on Tuesday night.

Last year, construction of a new classroom building within a sixty-foot clear area surrounding Building J on campus was approved by the Board. The Division of the State Architect (DSA) recently delivered some mandatory revisions to the project.

Among the required changes is upgrading the main entry door to meet Americans with Disabilities Act codes and requirements.

"Reviewing options with the principal and staff, relocating the front doors to the original location on the building closer to the parking lot was preferable and created a safer entrance," staff wrote in a report. "By coordinating the fencing and new building projects, the relocated front door location creates an obvious public main entrance to the campus office and integrated fencing to separate the public from student/staff areas."

The related scope of work includes adding ADA concrete landing upgrades, lighting and signage at the new front door, as well as making "interior walls, doors, HVAC, and fire alarm changes to accommodate door relocation and the displaced office where the door will be located."

Two existing rooftop HVAC units "that are beyond repair and were installed without DSA approvals" will also be replaced, requiring structural engineer analysis and detailing for state approval, as well as "campus entrance fence modifications to accommodate door relocation and fire truck access."

The relocation of the door and window at the existing science classroom in Building J is also required. Staff said, "By relocating the door and window, safety is increased by avoiding adding fencing between the building and drop off at a pinch point in the walkway."

The board is set to approve a $98,465 contract with HKIT Architects for the latest project revision, which will be funded by Measure I1 revenue.

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