News

Governor announces new statewide reopening process during COVID-19 pandemic

Counties to be separated into four tiers with corresponding thresholds

Map shows all 58 California counties broken down into the new COVID-19 categories. Alameda County falls into the Widespread category. (Image courtesy of CDPH)

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a revamped statewide process Friday for counties to reopen things like businesses and schools during the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

Counties will be placed in one of four tiers -- Widespread, Substantial, Moderate and Minimal -- based on their rate of the virus' spread.

Each tier corresponds with thresholds for a county's rate of new cases per 100,000 residents and the rate of positive tests, Newsom said.

The Widespread category, in which counties are placed when they have more than seven new cases per 100,000 and a positivity rate of more than 8%, will replace the state's COVID-19 monitoring list to signify counties with the worst virality rates in the state.

"We hope (the new framework) is not only more dynamic but it's much more simple to understand," Newsom said. "(But) stringent, nonetheless, in terms of its application."

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The tier system will be updated weekly on Tuesdays, according to Newsom. Among the state's 58 counties, 38 will begin on the Widespread tier, nine counties on the Substantial tier, eight counties on the Moderate tier and three counties on the Minimal tier.

Roughly 87% of the state's residents live in counties that are currently in the Widespread tier. San Francisco and Napa counties are the only two in the greater Bay Area that are not in the Widespread tier, sitting in the Substantial tier instead.

The tier system will go into effect Monday at the same time that hair salons and barbershops will receive a green light from the state to begin operating indoors with modifications statewide, regardless of which tier their county sits within.

Previously, salons and barbershops had only been allowed to operate outdoors for counties on the monitoring list.

Much like the previous system, schools will not be allowed to resume in-person instruction until the county they're in has moved out of the Widespread tier.

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The state's previous reopening system, revolving around the monitoring list, involved counties being added to the list once their coronavirus case, positivity, hospitalization and intensive care unit rates had reached certain levels for three consecutive days.

Counties would also be removed from the list for reigning in the virus' spread for three consecutive days.

Reaching each tier of the new system, Newsom said, will take far more time to ensure a county is truly snuffing the virus' spread in an effective way.

Counties can only progress one tier at a time toward a larger reopening, and counties that progress from one tier to another must remain in their new state for at least 21 days.

A county must also meet the next tier's case and positivity rate thresholds for at least 14 consecutive days before they can progress from a higher tier like Widespread to Substantial.

Newsom said state health officials had recognized that the previous attempt to reopen in late May and June had been too lenient at the county level.

"We put out guidelines," Newsom said. "They didn't mean go, but we empowered the counties to make decisions based upon attestations and partnerships that had to form with county health officers signing off with county officials on their ability to move."

"We're going to be more stubborn this time," he said.

The state's first attempt at reopening led to increased spread of the virus in June and July. The state's coronavirus hospitalizations spiked during that time, from 3,142 on June 4 to 7,170 on July 21.

Since mid-July, when the state clamped down on indoor operations at businesses like bars, movie theaters and restaurants, statewide hospitalizations have fallen to 4,205, as of Thursday.

The tier system will not include thresholds for hospitalizations and ICU bed availability that counties must meet to progress from one tier.

That change clashes with previous suggestions from Newsom and state health officials that hospitalizations and ICU data were vital real-time metrics to track the virus' spread.

California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly said focusing on case and test data is a way of catching the virus earlier than hospital data allows.

"We know that when you find a case today that it has a chance to end up in the hospital three, four weeks down the road," he said, adding, "we still maintain that those hospital numbers are very reliable."

Newsom also announced that the state has redesigned its coronavirus hub website, covid19.ca.gov, and added a "What's Open" tool that residents can use to see which tier their county is at and the operating status for businesses like restaurants, zoos and retail stores.

Newsom said the state plans to launch a pair of public service announcements in English and Spanish to highlight the danger of spreading the coronavirus and flouting the state's health guidelines to wear a face covering and keep distance from others.

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Governor announces new statewide reopening process during COVID-19 pandemic

Counties to be separated into four tiers with corresponding thresholds

Uploaded: Fri, Aug 28, 2020, 4:16 pm
Updated: Sun, Aug 30, 2020, 4:00 pm

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a revamped statewide process Friday for counties to reopen things like businesses and schools during the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

Counties will be placed in one of four tiers -- Widespread, Substantial, Moderate and Minimal -- based on their rate of the virus' spread.

Each tier corresponds with thresholds for a county's rate of new cases per 100,000 residents and the rate of positive tests, Newsom said.

The Widespread category, in which counties are placed when they have more than seven new cases per 100,000 and a positivity rate of more than 8%, will replace the state's COVID-19 monitoring list to signify counties with the worst virality rates in the state.

"We hope (the new framework) is not only more dynamic but it's much more simple to understand," Newsom said. "(But) stringent, nonetheless, in terms of its application."

The tier system will be updated weekly on Tuesdays, according to Newsom. Among the state's 58 counties, 38 will begin on the Widespread tier, nine counties on the Substantial tier, eight counties on the Moderate tier and three counties on the Minimal tier.

Roughly 87% of the state's residents live in counties that are currently in the Widespread tier. San Francisco and Napa counties are the only two in the greater Bay Area that are not in the Widespread tier, sitting in the Substantial tier instead.

The tier system will go into effect Monday at the same time that hair salons and barbershops will receive a green light from the state to begin operating indoors with modifications statewide, regardless of which tier their county sits within.

Previously, salons and barbershops had only been allowed to operate outdoors for counties on the monitoring list.

Much like the previous system, schools will not be allowed to resume in-person instruction until the county they're in has moved out of the Widespread tier.

The state's previous reopening system, revolving around the monitoring list, involved counties being added to the list once their coronavirus case, positivity, hospitalization and intensive care unit rates had reached certain levels for three consecutive days.

Counties would also be removed from the list for reigning in the virus' spread for three consecutive days.

Reaching each tier of the new system, Newsom said, will take far more time to ensure a county is truly snuffing the virus' spread in an effective way.

Counties can only progress one tier at a time toward a larger reopening, and counties that progress from one tier to another must remain in their new state for at least 21 days.

A county must also meet the next tier's case and positivity rate thresholds for at least 14 consecutive days before they can progress from a higher tier like Widespread to Substantial.

Newsom said state health officials had recognized that the previous attempt to reopen in late May and June had been too lenient at the county level.

"We put out guidelines," Newsom said. "They didn't mean go, but we empowered the counties to make decisions based upon attestations and partnerships that had to form with county health officers signing off with county officials on their ability to move."

"We're going to be more stubborn this time," he said.

The state's first attempt at reopening led to increased spread of the virus in June and July. The state's coronavirus hospitalizations spiked during that time, from 3,142 on June 4 to 7,170 on July 21.

Since mid-July, when the state clamped down on indoor operations at businesses like bars, movie theaters and restaurants, statewide hospitalizations have fallen to 4,205, as of Thursday.

The tier system will not include thresholds for hospitalizations and ICU bed availability that counties must meet to progress from one tier.

That change clashes with previous suggestions from Newsom and state health officials that hospitalizations and ICU data were vital real-time metrics to track the virus' spread.

California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly said focusing on case and test data is a way of catching the virus earlier than hospital data allows.

"We know that when you find a case today that it has a chance to end up in the hospital three, four weeks down the road," he said, adding, "we still maintain that those hospital numbers are very reliable."

Newsom also announced that the state has redesigned its coronavirus hub website, covid19.ca.gov, and added a "What's Open" tool that residents can use to see which tier their county is at and the operating status for businesses like restaurants, zoos and retail stores.

Newsom said the state plans to launch a pair of public service announcements in English and Spanish to highlight the danger of spreading the coronavirus and flouting the state's health guidelines to wear a face covering and keep distance from others.

— Bay City News Service

Comments

Jake Waters
Registered user
Birdland
on Sep 2, 2020 at 8:11 am
Jake Waters, Birdland
Registered user
on Sep 2, 2020 at 8:11 am
5 people like this

So, with all the information coming out exposing the manipulation of the data- exposure rate and death rate falsifications; the problem with the tests kits and the testing process; problems with the ‘masks’ providing real safety; and more, Gavin Newsom and his Liberal Arts Majors are doubling down on fear. Why, because fear works, particularly when people fail to research, read, ask questions, and stay indoors and sequester themselves away. The joke on much of the population is that Democrat leaders know this is political: several Democrat Governors have been caught sneaking around living their life while imposing restrictions on their citizenry. The latest is Nancy Pelosi getting her hair done in San Francisco, and of course not wearing a mask.

You can be sure if we don’t, as a country, start pushing back we will become subjected to the most manipulative and destructive medical experimentation since WW2- in the form of forced vaccinations.

Start your search and Google Dr. Carrie Madej and listen to several of her interviews. Ask yourself why is ‘American Front Line Doctors’ being censored? Why are a number of doctors around the world being closed off? Listen to the debate between Allan Dershowitz and Robert Kennedy Jr. There is more, but you have to look.

Why is Dr. Fauci, and Bill Gates (with no medical training) the few that are allowed to weigh in?

What is this ‘Science’ the Democrats keep referring to?


BobB
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Sep 2, 2020 at 1:24 pm
BobB, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 2, 2020 at 1:24 pm
17 people like this

Anti-vaxxer, please go away.

Wear a mask. Practice social distancing. Get a flu shot.


Jake Waters
Registered user
Birdland
on Sep 2, 2020 at 5:56 pm
Jake Waters, Birdland
Registered user
on Sep 2, 2020 at 5:56 pm
9 people like this

People need to realize that commenters as @BobB are dangerous. They have an agenda. He no more cares about the situation except to babble the same thing over and over again. He does no research. He is not a doctor. He just repeats the same moronic babel. Do the research. Look. Ask questions.

Don’t be sheep.


BobB
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Sep 2, 2020 at 9:58 pm
BobB, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 2, 2020 at 9:58 pm
17 people like this

Jake Waters is pushing anti-vaccine garbage in the middle of a pandemic. This is at a time when we really need everyone to follow the public health guidelines to save lives and keep vulnerable people from getting very sick. Follow the advice of a qualified doctor and ignore people like Jake Waters.

This is serious Jake Waters. Knock it off.


Jake Waters
Registered user
Birdland
on Sep 2, 2020 at 10:37 pm
Jake Waters, Birdland
Registered user
on Sep 2, 2020 at 10:37 pm
3 people like this

@BobB is extremely dangerous. Just listen to his patter.

People need to understand what is at stake here. Vaccines work about 50-55% of the time. Ask what is in it. Start listening to the doctors that are speaking out about this ‘New’ vaccine, as I reported in the above post. This illness falls along the pattern of a flue. The testing has been unreliable and miscalculated. COVID is actually only caused about 6% of the deaths as a virus on its own. Much of the time death occurs because of the underlying conditions much like the flu season. Read. Research. Discover for yourself.


BobB
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Sep 3, 2020 at 10:30 am
BobB, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 3, 2020 at 10:30 am
15 people like this

I take comfort in the fact that the majority of the people ignore the anti-vaccine garbage being pushed by some people. To anyone who might be thinking otherwise; Talk to a real doctor, at a legitimate clinic like ValleyCare Medical Center or Kaiser Permanente. Here is some COVID-19 information from their web sites that also addresses misinformation that's circulating.

Web Link
Web Link

Concerning vaccine safety, see these links.

CDC: Web Link
Kaiser: Web Link

Bottom line: Wear a mask. Practice social distancing. Get a flu shot.

We are all in this together.


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