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Pleasanton Unified changes coronavirus plan, cancels classes on Monday too

Aligns PUSD with other Tri-Valley public districts; Catholic schools also closing

The Pleasanton Unified School District has opted to now cancel classes on Monday too, Superintendent David Haglund announced Sunday morning, citing changing dynamics with coronavirus response regionally.

The original plan endorsed by the school board on Friday was to ask students to report Monday for final in-class lessons before extended dismissal starting next day.

But Haglund said Sunday that the district needed to adjust its strategy after several new developments from Friday evening and into the weekend. Now, starting Monday (March 16) until at least April 14, PUSD will forgo in-person classes in favor of online lessons to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

The move now aligns PUSD’s coronavirus plan more closely with the other public school districts in the Tri-Valley -- each of which was confirmed at individual school board meetings on Friday. Catholic schools in the Tri-Valley are also being closed in the short-term under diocese orders.

Pleasanton Unified School District

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PUSD’s plan for reducing the risk of exposure to COVID-19 by dismissing students from campus for the next month began unfolding publicly on Friday with an “unprecedented” emergency meeting at which the Board of Trustees unanimously declared a state of emergency and supported closing campuses to students in favor of a schooling-at-home strategy.

Most attendees that spoke during the public comment portion supported the decision for a dismissal, calling it “critical” to move on mitigating the virus and flattening the epidemic curve, a statistical chart that illustrates when and how quickly new cases are reported.

The board ultimately endorsed the proposal to dismiss students from campus from Tuesday (March 17) through at least April 13 -- a period that would include two weeks of remote lessons for students as well as the district’s spring break as originally scheduled.

The original idea was to allow students the option to report to school on Monday for a final day of in-class instruction before the four-week dismissal. (Every PUSD school had been closed on Friday for a prescheduled student non-attendance and teacher non-work day.)

But Haglund decided on Sunday to switch course and cancel classes on Monday too, in the interest of safety and to reduce risk of exposure.

Find out what's on the ballot in Pleasanton, Livermore and Dublin.

Find out what's on the ballot in Pleasanton, Livermore and Dublin.

“Our original plan was to bring students to their schools on Monday; However, a few things have happened since Friday midday that have shifted our thinking,” Haglund said in a message to the PUSD community.

He specifically cited the city of Pleasanton’s decision late in the day Friday to close all non-essential city facilities such as the joint-use gyms at PUSD middle schools, an increase by Saturday of the number of school districts halting in-person classes starting on Monday, and a continued uptick of confirmed coronavirus cases in Alameda and Contra Costa counties.

“Thank you for your help and support as we work through this challenging and complex situation together,” Haglund said to end his letter.

So PUSD’s current plan involves students being out of school all of this week (March 16-20) while teachers "receive professional development and learn about delivering flexible instruction" and the process of checking out devices begins. The district encourages students to consider “independent learning activities at home” during this week.

The two weeks after -- March 23 through April 3 -- flexible instruction and remote learning will start, with teachers providing daily instruction and feedback. Spring break will take place as planned April 6-13, during which time there will be no instruction.

Flexible instruction and remote learning will start again April 14, with no end date determined yet, unless and until otherwise notified by Alameda County Public Health Department that reopening is safe.

Students in need of a Chromebook or WiFi hotspot to access remote learning materials can request a device and technology support through the district website. An email will be sent to students once their devices are ready for pickup at the district office, 4665 Bernal Ave. Distribution is scheduled to begin March 17.

“In the days and weeks ahead, please feel free to reach out to your school's administration for specific direction relating to ongoing student learning and support,” Haglund said.

All PUSD school sites and the district headquarters on Bernal Avenue are scheduled to remain open to the public during the entire dismissal period, including staff to answer phone calls. All employees were scheduled to report to their regular workplaces on Monday.

PUSD said on Friday it would soon announce the status of its other impacted programs, including special education, Horizon Early Education, STEAM Preschool, Kids Club and iPals Preschool.

The district will also offer meals at no cost to students who want to participate during the dismissal period. All meals will be grab-and-go style; seating will not be offered. Starting Monday, families can go to the district website to review the menu and preorder meals.

Meal pickup will be available at the following locations:

* Pleasanton Middle School (breakfast 7:30-8:30 a.m.; lunch 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.)

* Valley View Elementary School (breakfast 7:30-8:30 a.m.; lunch 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.)

* Lydiksen Elementary School (breakfast 7:30-8:30 a.m.; lunch 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.)

* Alisal Elementary School (breakfast 7:30-8:30 a.m.; lunch 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.).

Follow updates on all coronavirus-related impacts at www.pleasantonusd.net.

Dublin Unified School District

DUSD Superintendent Dave Marken announced that he made the decision to “suspend classes beginning on Monday, March 16, 2020 through Friday, April 10, 2020, with classes resuming on Monday, April 13, 2020.”

The Board of Trustees made a unanimous advisory vote during a special emergency meeting on Friday during the same time PUSD held theirs. District offices will also be closed to the public and will not receive phone calls or in-person visits.

Dublin teachers will share lesson plans with families and students will be expected to complete assignments while campuses are closed.

“Because we are in uncharted territory, this process will likely include some speedbumps and we ask for your patience as we navigate this journey together. We understand that nothing can replace the interaction between students and instructional staff in the classroom,” Marken said.

“We’d like to make it clear -- do not, under any circumstances, expect individual learning plans for each and every one of our over 12,900 students,” he added.

DUSD students currently receiving meal assistance will still have access to a “grab and go” bagged breakfast and lunch during the suspension period, including over spring break.

Meals will be available at Dublin High School, 8151 Village Pkwy., and Cottonwood Creek Elementary, 2400 Central Pkwy. from 7-9 a.m. for breakfast and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. for lunch. Meals will be available but seating will not be offered at either site. Families can review the menu and pre-order meals on the DUSD website this week. Those who need meal assistance can apply at https://www.myschoolapps.com/Application at least 48 hours before they plan to receive breakfast and lunch.

DUSD is also “finalizing a plan to allow students to borrow a Chromebook and/or wireless Internet access point so that they may continue to have access to online curricular resources for the duration of the suspension of regular school activities.”

The devices will be checked out and returned “in a similar fashion to a library book.” Details about the program will be available soon, according to the district.

For more information, visit www.dublin.k12.ca.us.

Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District

LVJUSD also held an emergency board meeting on Friday afternoon and voted to dismiss their schools beginning Monday into mid-April.

“Acting in the best interest of the health and safety of our students, staff, families, and community, our Board of Education, at the recommendation of our superintendent, Dr. Kelly Bowers, voted unanimously to dismiss schools, beginning Monday, March 16, 2020 through Friday, April 3, 2020,” the district said on its website. “We expect to resume in-class learning at our schools on Tuesday, April 14, 2020, following our regularly scheduled Spring Break (April 6 - 13, 2020).”

Flexible learning opportunities that can be accessed from home will also be available for LVJUSD students during the suspension period; an email with more information will be sent to families this week.

Philomena Rambo, district director of community engagement, said their child nutrition services department “will offer all children aged 18 and younger free meal pick-up service at East Avenue Middle School (3951 East Ave.), Junction Avenue K-8 School (298 Junction Ave.) and Marylin Avenue Elementary School (800 Marylin Ave.). We will offer delivery from the inside (center) of the drop off loop from 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. Monday - Friday, March 16 - April 3. Each child will receive a breakfast and lunch.”

To learn more, visit livermoreschools.org.

San Ramon Valley Unified School District

The SRVUSD Board of Education has announced that it will be closing down all school sites starting Monday (March 16) through at least April 10 amid concerns about the potential spread of the COVID-19

Announced during the district’s special emergency board meeting on Friday, Superintendent Rick Schmitt asked for patience as district staff release details for supporting families and educating students over the proceeding closure, with communications planned for Friday night and through the following week.

“As the entire country is aware, we are in the middle of an unprecedented, extraordinary time and government agencies including school districts around the country are taking unprecedented action to keep families and staff safe,” Schmitt said at the meeting.

“I would also like to ask our community to be patient in these extraordinary times, to be careful, to give us time next week to establish process and procedures and really be able to define and organize a plan to help our students over the next few weeks,” he added.

While campuses will be closed for four weeks in total, officially Friday’s decision will close school sites for three weeks and continue through the district’s previously scheduled spring break holiday during the week of April 6.

While details are being hammered out with regards to potentially providing remote or online learning opportunities and supporting community members, Schmitt said that the district will aggressively work to inform the public of the district’s decision and each school site’s principal will be on campus Monday to alert any stragglers of the decision.

District officials did note that for students who qualify for the Federal Lunch Program, John Baldwin Elementary and Walt Disney Elementary will be staffed to serve lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. beginning on Monday, March 16.

Due to concerns over spreading COVID-19 and in an effort to promote the practice of “social distancing,” Friday’s meeting was live streamed on the district’s YouTube account -- which was viewed by more than 4,000 residents at the time of screening -- and closed to the public.

Residents were allowed to digitally submit comment cards prior to the start of the meeting, however individuals were not welcome to attend comment in person during the open-session portion of the meeting, with SRVUSD officials citing Gov. Gavin Newsom's executive order on coronavirus suspending certain Brown Act requirements in an effort to prevent large gatherings according to district officials.

To learn more, visit https://srvusd-ca.schoolloop.com.

Local Catholic schools

All schools within the Diocese of Oakland, which includes the Tri-Valley, are also being closed in response to coronavirus prevention -- though the diocese noted that as of Friday no faculty, staff or student in the diocesan schools had tested positive for COVID-19, according to Bay City News Service.

The plan, as of Friday, was to institute a two-week closure that begins on Wednesday (March 18) and continues until normal operations resume on April 1. Adjustments will be made as deemed necessary, officials told Bay City News Service.

That closure list includes Catholic schools in the Tri-Valley, which fall under the Diocese of Oakland -- St. Raymond School in Dublin, St. Michael School in Livermore and St. Isidore School in Danville.

Monday is a school holiday for the diocese, but students are scheduled to report to school on Tuesday -- unless ill -- for final in-classes lessons and to prepare for at-home instruction that will continue during the closure period.

To learn more, contact the individual school.

Editor’s note: The Weekly is also working to confirm school impacts on other private institutions in the Tri-Valley. If you have verified information, contact editor Jeremy Walsh at [email protected]

Minimize your risk

Health experts strongly recommend the public follows these steps to minimize their risk of COVID-19 transmission:

* Wash hands with liquid soap and water and rub for at least 20 seconds;

* Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing;

* Refrain from touching your eyes, nose and mouth;

* Stay home when you are sick; and

* Get a flu shot to protect yourself and others from the flu, which has similar symptoms to COVID19.

People who are healthy do not need to use a facemask to protect themselves from COVID-19. A face mask is recommended for those who are coughing or sneezing to protect others from getting sick.

ACPHD has a webpage dedicated to updates, advice and information about COVID-19 at http://acphd.org/2019-ncov.aspx.

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Pleasanton Unified changes coronavirus plan, cancels classes on Monday too

Aligns PUSD with other Tri-Valley public districts; Catholic schools also closing

by Jeremy Walsh, Julia Baum and Ryan J. Degan / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Sun, Mar 15, 2020, 10:50 am
Updated: Sun, Mar 15, 2020, 1:39 pm

The Pleasanton Unified School District has opted to now cancel classes on Monday too, Superintendent David Haglund announced Sunday morning, citing changing dynamics with coronavirus response regionally.

The original plan endorsed by the school board on Friday was to ask students to report Monday for final in-class lessons before extended dismissal starting next day.

But Haglund said Sunday that the district needed to adjust its strategy after several new developments from Friday evening and into the weekend. Now, starting Monday (March 16) until at least April 14, PUSD will forgo in-person classes in favor of online lessons to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

The move now aligns PUSD’s coronavirus plan more closely with the other public school districts in the Tri-Valley -- each of which was confirmed at individual school board meetings on Friday. Catholic schools in the Tri-Valley are also being closed in the short-term under diocese orders.

Pleasanton Unified School District

PUSD’s plan for reducing the risk of exposure to COVID-19 by dismissing students from campus for the next month began unfolding publicly on Friday with an “unprecedented” emergency meeting at which the Board of Trustees unanimously declared a state of emergency and supported closing campuses to students in favor of a schooling-at-home strategy.

Most attendees that spoke during the public comment portion supported the decision for a dismissal, calling it “critical” to move on mitigating the virus and flattening the epidemic curve, a statistical chart that illustrates when and how quickly new cases are reported.

The board ultimately endorsed the proposal to dismiss students from campus from Tuesday (March 17) through at least April 13 -- a period that would include two weeks of remote lessons for students as well as the district’s spring break as originally scheduled.

The original idea was to allow students the option to report to school on Monday for a final day of in-class instruction before the four-week dismissal. (Every PUSD school had been closed on Friday for a prescheduled student non-attendance and teacher non-work day.)

But Haglund decided on Sunday to switch course and cancel classes on Monday too, in the interest of safety and to reduce risk of exposure.

“Our original plan was to bring students to their schools on Monday; However, a few things have happened since Friday midday that have shifted our thinking,” Haglund said in a message to the PUSD community.

He specifically cited the city of Pleasanton’s decision late in the day Friday to close all non-essential city facilities such as the joint-use gyms at PUSD middle schools, an increase by Saturday of the number of school districts halting in-person classes starting on Monday, and a continued uptick of confirmed coronavirus cases in Alameda and Contra Costa counties.

“Thank you for your help and support as we work through this challenging and complex situation together,” Haglund said to end his letter.

So PUSD’s current plan involves students being out of school all of this week (March 16-20) while teachers "receive professional development and learn about delivering flexible instruction" and the process of checking out devices begins. The district encourages students to consider “independent learning activities at home” during this week.

The two weeks after -- March 23 through April 3 -- flexible instruction and remote learning will start, with teachers providing daily instruction and feedback. Spring break will take place as planned April 6-13, during which time there will be no instruction.

Flexible instruction and remote learning will start again April 14, with no end date determined yet, unless and until otherwise notified by Alameda County Public Health Department that reopening is safe.

Students in need of a Chromebook or WiFi hotspot to access remote learning materials can request a device and technology support through the district website. An email will be sent to students once their devices are ready for pickup at the district office, 4665 Bernal Ave. Distribution is scheduled to begin March 17.

“In the days and weeks ahead, please feel free to reach out to your school's administration for specific direction relating to ongoing student learning and support,” Haglund said.

All PUSD school sites and the district headquarters on Bernal Avenue are scheduled to remain open to the public during the entire dismissal period, including staff to answer phone calls. All employees were scheduled to report to their regular workplaces on Monday.

PUSD said on Friday it would soon announce the status of its other impacted programs, including special education, Horizon Early Education, STEAM Preschool, Kids Club and iPals Preschool.

The district will also offer meals at no cost to students who want to participate during the dismissal period. All meals will be grab-and-go style; seating will not be offered. Starting Monday, families can go to the district website to review the menu and preorder meals.

Meal pickup will be available at the following locations:

* Pleasanton Middle School (breakfast 7:30-8:30 a.m.; lunch 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.)

* Valley View Elementary School (breakfast 7:30-8:30 a.m.; lunch 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.)

* Lydiksen Elementary School (breakfast 7:30-8:30 a.m.; lunch 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.)

* Alisal Elementary School (breakfast 7:30-8:30 a.m.; lunch 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.).

Follow updates on all coronavirus-related impacts at www.pleasantonusd.net.

Dublin Unified School District

DUSD Superintendent Dave Marken announced that he made the decision to “suspend classes beginning on Monday, March 16, 2020 through Friday, April 10, 2020, with classes resuming on Monday, April 13, 2020.”

The Board of Trustees made a unanimous advisory vote during a special emergency meeting on Friday during the same time PUSD held theirs. District offices will also be closed to the public and will not receive phone calls or in-person visits.

Dublin teachers will share lesson plans with families and students will be expected to complete assignments while campuses are closed.

“Because we are in uncharted territory, this process will likely include some speedbumps and we ask for your patience as we navigate this journey together. We understand that nothing can replace the interaction between students and instructional staff in the classroom,” Marken said.

“We’d like to make it clear -- do not, under any circumstances, expect individual learning plans for each and every one of our over 12,900 students,” he added.

DUSD students currently receiving meal assistance will still have access to a “grab and go” bagged breakfast and lunch during the suspension period, including over spring break.

Meals will be available at Dublin High School, 8151 Village Pkwy., and Cottonwood Creek Elementary, 2400 Central Pkwy. from 7-9 a.m. for breakfast and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. for lunch. Meals will be available but seating will not be offered at either site. Families can review the menu and pre-order meals on the DUSD website this week. Those who need meal assistance can apply at https://www.myschoolapps.com/Application at least 48 hours before they plan to receive breakfast and lunch.

DUSD is also “finalizing a plan to allow students to borrow a Chromebook and/or wireless Internet access point so that they may continue to have access to online curricular resources for the duration of the suspension of regular school activities.”

The devices will be checked out and returned “in a similar fashion to a library book.” Details about the program will be available soon, according to the district.

For more information, visit www.dublin.k12.ca.us.

Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District

LVJUSD also held an emergency board meeting on Friday afternoon and voted to dismiss their schools beginning Monday into mid-April.

“Acting in the best interest of the health and safety of our students, staff, families, and community, our Board of Education, at the recommendation of our superintendent, Dr. Kelly Bowers, voted unanimously to dismiss schools, beginning Monday, March 16, 2020 through Friday, April 3, 2020,” the district said on its website. “We expect to resume in-class learning at our schools on Tuesday, April 14, 2020, following our regularly scheduled Spring Break (April 6 - 13, 2020).”

Flexible learning opportunities that can be accessed from home will also be available for LVJUSD students during the suspension period; an email with more information will be sent to families this week.

Philomena Rambo, district director of community engagement, said their child nutrition services department “will offer all children aged 18 and younger free meal pick-up service at East Avenue Middle School (3951 East Ave.), Junction Avenue K-8 School (298 Junction Ave.) and Marylin Avenue Elementary School (800 Marylin Ave.). We will offer delivery from the inside (center) of the drop off loop from 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. Monday - Friday, March 16 - April 3. Each child will receive a breakfast and lunch.”

To learn more, visit livermoreschools.org.

San Ramon Valley Unified School District

The SRVUSD Board of Education has announced that it will be closing down all school sites starting Monday (March 16) through at least April 10 amid concerns about the potential spread of the COVID-19

Announced during the district’s special emergency board meeting on Friday, Superintendent Rick Schmitt asked for patience as district staff release details for supporting families and educating students over the proceeding closure, with communications planned for Friday night and through the following week.

“As the entire country is aware, we are in the middle of an unprecedented, extraordinary time and government agencies including school districts around the country are taking unprecedented action to keep families and staff safe,” Schmitt said at the meeting.

“I would also like to ask our community to be patient in these extraordinary times, to be careful, to give us time next week to establish process and procedures and really be able to define and organize a plan to help our students over the next few weeks,” he added.

While campuses will be closed for four weeks in total, officially Friday’s decision will close school sites for three weeks and continue through the district’s previously scheduled spring break holiday during the week of April 6.

While details are being hammered out with regards to potentially providing remote or online learning opportunities and supporting community members, Schmitt said that the district will aggressively work to inform the public of the district’s decision and each school site’s principal will be on campus Monday to alert any stragglers of the decision.

District officials did note that for students who qualify for the Federal Lunch Program, John Baldwin Elementary and Walt Disney Elementary will be staffed to serve lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. beginning on Monday, March 16.

Due to concerns over spreading COVID-19 and in an effort to promote the practice of “social distancing,” Friday’s meeting was live streamed on the district’s YouTube account -- which was viewed by more than 4,000 residents at the time of screening -- and closed to the public.

Residents were allowed to digitally submit comment cards prior to the start of the meeting, however individuals were not welcome to attend comment in person during the open-session portion of the meeting, with SRVUSD officials citing Gov. Gavin Newsom's executive order on coronavirus suspending certain Brown Act requirements in an effort to prevent large gatherings according to district officials.

To learn more, visit https://srvusd-ca.schoolloop.com.

Local Catholic schools

All schools within the Diocese of Oakland, which includes the Tri-Valley, are also being closed in response to coronavirus prevention -- though the diocese noted that as of Friday no faculty, staff or student in the diocesan schools had tested positive for COVID-19, according to Bay City News Service.

The plan, as of Friday, was to institute a two-week closure that begins on Wednesday (March 18) and continues until normal operations resume on April 1. Adjustments will be made as deemed necessary, officials told Bay City News Service.

That closure list includes Catholic schools in the Tri-Valley, which fall under the Diocese of Oakland -- St. Raymond School in Dublin, St. Michael School in Livermore and St. Isidore School in Danville.

Monday is a school holiday for the diocese, but students are scheduled to report to school on Tuesday -- unless ill -- for final in-classes lessons and to prepare for at-home instruction that will continue during the closure period.

To learn more, contact the individual school.

Editor’s note: The Weekly is also working to confirm school impacts on other private institutions in the Tri-Valley. If you have verified information, contact editor Jeremy Walsh at [email protected]

Minimize your risk

Health experts strongly recommend the public follows these steps to minimize their risk of COVID-19 transmission:

* Wash hands with liquid soap and water and rub for at least 20 seconds;

* Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing;

* Refrain from touching your eyes, nose and mouth;

* Stay home when you are sick; and

* Get a flu shot to protect yourself and others from the flu, which has similar symptoms to COVID19.

People who are healthy do not need to use a facemask to protect themselves from COVID-19. A face mask is recommended for those who are coughing or sneezing to protect others from getting sick.

ACPHD has a webpage dedicated to updates, advice and information about COVID-19 at http://acphd.org/2019-ncov.aspx.

Comments

Richie
Livermore
on Mar 16, 2020 at 10:00 am
Richie , Livermore
on Mar 16, 2020 at 10:00 am

And Pleasanton teachers have been told by Haglund they need to be in their classrooms everyday regardless in order to get paid and if the schools fully shut down they will need to use sick time until that runs out. Great leadership message from our half wit superintendent to a failing school district that cant retain teachers as it is....


Kathleen Ruegsegger
Vintage Hills
on Mar 16, 2020 at 10:43 am
Kathleen Ruegsegger, Vintage Hills
on Mar 16, 2020 at 10:43 am

I am honestly trying to understand why, once again, the school board members looked at the original staff proposal of bringing students back on campuses for one day (after they’ve been out and about for three days of possible exposure) and didn’t say, “ah, h e double matchsticks, no.”


Pleasanton
Amberwood/Wood Meadows
on Mar 17, 2020 at 1:47 am
Pleasanton, Amberwood/Wood Meadows
on Mar 17, 2020 at 1:47 am

@ Richie - the teachers were still getting paid. why would they not work? i still intended to work until the shelter in order place came down.


urmomz
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Mar 17, 2020 at 4:42 am
urmomz, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Mar 17, 2020 at 4:42 am

"@ Richie - the teachers were still getting paid. why would they not work? i still intended to work until the shelter in order place came down."

Maybe because there's no students to teach and needlessly bringing together dozens of teachers to spread the virus to each other would be idiotic?


@Richie
Ruby Hill
on Mar 17, 2020 at 12:06 pm
@Richie, Ruby Hill
on Mar 17, 2020 at 12:06 pm

@ Richie....

Not accurate about Haglund. He was the one wanting to make sure teachers would get paid during this situation.

He allowed teachers to work remotely or be on site, whatever worked best for their family situation. So your characterization and facts about him are not fair and not correct.

Feel free to post an apology as quickly as you criticized.


True info
Apperson Ridge
on Mar 17, 2020 at 12:47 pm
True info, Apperson Ridge
on Mar 17, 2020 at 12:47 pm

Here's the real information about how the board and Haglund took care of the situation. Last Friday they voted to have teachers and students at school Monday and Tuesday of this week. Teachers would stay Wednesday through Friday. Thankfully, they were convinced the change their mind by APT leadership. Sunday the schedule changed and teachers were required to attend virtual training Monday, but had to be at school. Students were not asked to attend.


I'm very thankful for my APT leadership because they were the ones who looked out for teacher and student exposure. Not sure if Haglund was focused on getting teachers paid, but he might have been.


Pleasanton
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Mar 17, 2020 at 2:19 pm
Pleasanton, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Mar 17, 2020 at 2:19 pm

@urmomz

there are students to teach. i have three at home that waiting to hear from their teachers. how is working in an isolated classroom needlessly bringing teachers together?


A teacher
another community
on Mar 17, 2020 at 4:13 pm
A teacher, another community
on Mar 17, 2020 at 4:13 pm

Why bring us to school to collaborate instead of letting us work from home? I gained literally nothing by sitting in my classroom to attend a meeting when I could have done it from the isolation of my home. It was just silly, that’s all. Then they sent out an email midday telling us we had to leave anyway. Also, we have been directed that this week is non-instructional and we need time to prepare for remote instruction. I’m sorry if your children are waiting to hear from your teachers but we’re doing our best and we aren’t supposed to be sending out work anyway. Read the district emails, keep calm, and have some patience and understanding for your child’s educators. I’d like to think this community can come together in these awful circumstances, not fall apart immediately.


Karl
Birdland
on Mar 17, 2020 at 5:42 pm
Karl, Birdland
on Mar 17, 2020 at 5:42 pm

I know teachers are doing their best to deal with this difficult situation, just as many of us have.

The big advantage I and many tech workers have are the abilities, technology and attitude to work from home. Or even work from anywhere in the world.

Maybe we are seeing where our educational system needs to make some changes: training of teachers, procurement of technology and development of classes / educational materials that enable remote instruction.

We recently declined to approve bond money to fix neglected facilities. Maybe the school district needs to move to a 21st century paradigm and come up with a plan to move to new technology and remote / online instruction.

I think today’s students would thrive in this type of environment and the quality of education would increase.

The big question is whether the school board has the ability to think outside the box.

And the other question is whether teachers (or their union) will make the jump to the 21st century.


Kathleen Ruegsegger
Vintage Hills
on Mar 17, 2020 at 7:11 pm
Kathleen Ruegsegger, Vintage Hills
on Mar 17, 2020 at 7:11 pm

I agree the situation has been difficult for everyone and has created need for flexibility. One question: if teachers have access to emails of their students/parents and lesson plans for at least some days in advance (assumptive), why are we waiting for five days that students cannot apparently get back?

I have met with and have confidence in Amy Nichols who heads up technology. There also is a plan for technology that doesn’t rely on bond funding. However, if the board can put together a bond with specific projects and the guarantee those projects will be accomplished, including specific tech, I would support it.

I agree with Karl that students are ready; many teachers are likely ready as well (and I believe the union knows it is time for changes). And the board needs to think for themselves and not just rely on the administration to bring the future to them.


A teacher
another community
on Mar 17, 2020 at 8:02 pm
A teacher, another community
on Mar 17, 2020 at 8:02 pm

Hey I totally get that students are ready. Personally I am also ready and a few days ago thought it was dumb I couldn’t just keep my class rolling. But I am very tech savvy and turning my class into online instruction is not a huge struggle- for many teachers, they aren’t prepared at all and they need time to prep without students/parents expecting immediate results. When we begin the school year we have several days of PD and a teacher work day. At the beginning of the spring semester we also have a teacher work day. This is similar to that, except we know when the first day of the semester is, and none of us saw this coming (maybe for a week we suspected, but it wasn’t exactly on all our calendars!). I’m not exactly a defender of the DO (trust me on that) but I definitely see need for the district to be consistent with its expectations for teachers and students and for us to present our plans as a team. In addition to asking for a little bit of grace, I also ask that we keep in mind what is important here. Yes, education of course is important, but also family, health. Many of these kids have lost dances, games, performances, national competitions... We have no idea what other big things the kids will miss out on this year, and that is devastating. This has all happened extremely quickly and let’s just take a breath. Let your kids take a breath. If you believe pushing them into instruction immediately is important, you are welcome to use the resources the district has posted, or the many other resources available online.


Kathleen Ruegsegger
Vintage Hills
on Mar 17, 2020 at 8:15 pm
Kathleen Ruegsegger, Vintage Hills
on Mar 17, 2020 at 8:15 pm

A teacher, I appreciate your perspective and very much that you are prepared. I can speak for three students I know, all of whom, at various ages, are already bored. This is like summer and not like summer. Students think this will be fun, except they can’t actually go anywhere or do anything—they can’t even earn a few dollars working. Some teens are killing time, unproductive in my mind, on social media. Younger kids are squabbling with siblings or lonely if they are “onlys”. Sometimes, a sense of some normalcy is just what they need when everything else is turned upside down—like school would provide.

I don’t want to diminish the cause for the chaos, but if teachers are ready, let’s let them start. Holding all students back for what I hope are the few teachers who need help (and that’s perfectly fine) makes no sense, especially for middle and high school. Suggesting busy work to these young people is not going to work.


Michael Austin
Pleasanton Meadows
on Mar 17, 2020 at 8:35 pm
Michael Austin, Pleasanton Meadows
on Mar 17, 2020 at 8:35 pm

Ae the after school tutoring facilities still engaged with "laid off" students?


Ellen
another community
on Mar 18, 2020 at 10:30 am
Ellen, another community
on Mar 18, 2020 at 10:30 am

Wow. Get a grip. PEOPLE ARE DYING. This is a new experience for our entire world. Blaming others for our frustrations is ridiculous. Expecting anyone to know how to handle this perfectly is foolish. Be grateful the state has sent our children home to the safest place possible. I am sorry your children are bored. Read a book. I work at the school as a classified employee and will not be paid. Still believe they are doing the best they can in a new world.


Kathleen Ruegsegger
Vintage Hills
on Mar 18, 2020 at 11:29 am
Kathleen Ruegsegger, Vintage Hills
on Mar 18, 2020 at 11:29 am

The governor is making statements that school may be out until fall, which is sobering news, if not frightening, if It should happen. We can acknowledge that families, while safer at home, are worried about their child’s (ren’s) education. Reading a book only goes so far. What do we do for the weeks and months that follow? I don’t think anyone wants to see children promoted to the next grade with an asterisk after their “passing grade.”

Yes, and very sadly, people are dying. While society grapples with the difficult current realities, one of the things we must do is continue to protect the vulnerable (both health-wise and economically). We also need to protect providing as much normalcy as possible, including educating students of every age.

I am sorry and confused about why you would be at work (and likely essential as so many classified employees are) and not getting paid. Thank you for being there to help staff and families.


Ellen
another community
on Mar 18, 2020 at 11:47 am
Ellen , another community
on Mar 18, 2020 at 11:47 am

Kathleen, I am not working. At home, following the rules. I simply ask that we give the district time to implement new educational methods of teaching. It’s day 3......


Kathleen Ruegsegger
Vintage Hills
on Mar 18, 2020 at 12:17 pm
Kathleen Ruegsegger, Vintage Hills
on Mar 18, 2020 at 12:17 pm

Ellen, of course I don’t know your circumstances, but there is a waiver for collecting unemployment immediately (no one week wait). AVHS has staff around; students picking up materials from carts. Didn’t know if you were part of something like that.

I was reacting to A Teacher who indicated his/her readiness to start. My hope is this unfortunate event will create new opportunities in the future. Maybe something as simple as students who miss class due to illness or other circumstances will be able to participate online or pick up recorded content while home. I’m sure there are many ideas.

I hope you and those you care about are well and safe.


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