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Food waste: A growing problem

Eden Garden shares lessons about wasting less food

Eden Garden, a half-acre organic garden where produce is grown for food banks, held an open house last Saturday afternoon on its property at Crosswinds Church in Livermore to share lessons about how to stop food waste.

The group was awarded a StopWaste grant for $10,000 to promote awareness about food waste, and the open house to share the lessons learned this summer about reducing food waste was the final step to fulfill grant requirements.

At the event, visitors were able to sample foods made from ingredients that are often wasted; watch cooking and food preservation demonstrations by the Edibles group of the Livermore-Amador Valley Garden Club; and browse through resources collected by Eden Garden about reducing food waste.

The afternoon was also a chance to meet people from other garden-related groups in the area and share ideas.

To learn more about the issue of food waste and for simple ways to reduce it, visit www.StopFoodWaste.org. The website states that food scraps and food-soiled paper make up a third of what residents throw away in Alameda County, and that wasted food is a growing problem with financial, social and environmental impacts.

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Food waste: A growing problem

Eden Garden shares lessons about wasting less food

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Fri, Sep 27, 2019, 12:21 pm

Eden Garden, a half-acre organic garden where produce is grown for food banks, held an open house last Saturday afternoon on its property at Crosswinds Church in Livermore to share lessons about how to stop food waste.

The group was awarded a StopWaste grant for $10,000 to promote awareness about food waste, and the open house to share the lessons learned this summer about reducing food waste was the final step to fulfill grant requirements.

At the event, visitors were able to sample foods made from ingredients that are often wasted; watch cooking and food preservation demonstrations by the Edibles group of the Livermore-Amador Valley Garden Club; and browse through resources collected by Eden Garden about reducing food waste.

The afternoon was also a chance to meet people from other garden-related groups in the area and share ideas.

To learn more about the issue of food waste and for simple ways to reduce it, visit www.StopFoodWaste.org. The website states that food scraps and food-soiled paper make up a third of what residents throw away in Alameda County, and that wasted food is a growing problem with financial, social and environmental impacts.

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