News

PUSD: Students in intervention summer program see marked growth, improvement

Board also unanimously adopts PUSD 2018-19 unaudited actuals budget

Progress and updates from Pleasanton Unified School District's summer school programs were reviewed by the Board of Trustees on Tuesday night.

Enrichment courses and intervention programs offered this past summer at Amador Valley High, Walnut Grove Elementary and the Harvest Park preschool center were reviewed during a staff presentation at the board meeting.

A total of 938 pre K-12 students participated in intervention summer school this year and evidence showing that "students continued their growth of important skills" in the same program were among the noted highlights presented during the staff report.

Teachers "noted that a majority of students were properly placed" this summer, which staff called "an improvement over prior years," and that all grade levels showed "continued positive behavior." Students also gave some of their own feedback; some "noted improvement needed in the area of technology, teacher training and academic integrity."

PUSD's intervention summer programs continue to experience an "over-representation" of male students, who comprised about 60% of participants this year.

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"There's almost a 2-to-1 ratio of male attendees to female attendees in summer school," said Liz Lyons, vice principal at Lydiksen Elementary. "We do have a few more males who attend the conditional schools in Pleasanton, but I think it is notable to see that shift between the number of boys that are going after extended school year support."

As a counteraction, staff said that "collaboration with school sites and data collection will take place over the '19-20 school year in an effort to better understand the potential causes and to gain insight into instructional and behavioral support strategies that will interrupt the pattern."

More than 600 high school students "successfully completed" credit recovery or grade replacement courses through a "blended format" of online learning and subject area-credentialed instructors. The average grade for all courses was 76% or a C, according to the report.

Since 2016, 42% of students in grades K-8 were enrolled in summer school for at least two of those four years. Another third were enrolled in three of the past four years, and 15% had attended every single year during that time with the exception of students in the extended school year program.

Students took advantage of the district's 14 enrichment classes this summer such as algebra readiness, graphic design, video production, culinary arts and STEAM courses.

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Several areas for improvement that staff will focus on over the coming year include planning to "work with site leadership and intervention specialists to clarify intervention pathways" and "continue to coordinate wrap-around services for our most vulnerable students."

Staff also reported that peer tutoring was "one of the most treasured components of summer school," where high school students applied to be tutors. "They were dutiful and attentive," said staff, who added that "it really was a powerful experience ... to be part of the mainstream classroom" for students who came from alternative education programs.

The intervention summer programs budget was approximately $542,877. Funding came from the PUSD general fund, Local Control and Accountability Plan, Title I, special education, fees and donations.

In other business

The board also received a report Tuesday on the district's unaudited actuals, which included PUSD's actual revenues, expenditures and fund balances for the 2018-19 school year.

Under state law, the district is required to annually submit those statements to both the California Department of Education and the Alameda County Office of Education.

Among the update, the district's general fund ending balance for fiscal year 2018-19 is $26,417,508, according to public documents. Of that total, $11,016,568 is "unassigned/unappropriated" and $4,980,140 is designated "other assignments."

More than $5 million-plus is accounted for legally restricted balances, which are unspent balances of specific types of entitlements such as state categorical funds and local contributions from the Parent Teacher Association and Parent Faculty Club. Another $211,612 consists of revolving cash, prepaid expenditures and stores inventory.

The district's 3% economic uncertainties reserve is currently resting at $5,186,245; their goal is to eventually achieve a 9% reserve. That number could rise to 4.3%, should the trustees direct the district to contribute up to 20% of the unassigned ending balance. For this year, that would add another $2.2 million to the reserve, for a total balance of $7.4 million.

Meanwhile, PUSD's cafeteria fund "continues to be self-sustaining with no contributions from the general fund," while the deferred maintenance fund used about $800,000 in expenditures and the district bond fund had $7.3 million in expenditures The current cost of classroom compensation for the 2018-19 school year is 63.92% of total expenditures.

The board approved the unaudited actuals budget report 3-0. Trustees Joan Laursen and Mark Miller were both absent that evening.

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PUSD: Students in intervention summer program see marked growth, improvement

Board also unanimously adopts PUSD 2018-19 unaudited actuals budget

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Sep 11, 2019, 7:21 am

Progress and updates from Pleasanton Unified School District's summer school programs were reviewed by the Board of Trustees on Tuesday night.

Enrichment courses and intervention programs offered this past summer at Amador Valley High, Walnut Grove Elementary and the Harvest Park preschool center were reviewed during a staff presentation at the board meeting.

A total of 938 pre K-12 students participated in intervention summer school this year and evidence showing that "students continued their growth of important skills" in the same program were among the noted highlights presented during the staff report.

Teachers "noted that a majority of students were properly placed" this summer, which staff called "an improvement over prior years," and that all grade levels showed "continued positive behavior." Students also gave some of their own feedback; some "noted improvement needed in the area of technology, teacher training and academic integrity."

PUSD's intervention summer programs continue to experience an "over-representation" of male students, who comprised about 60% of participants this year.

"There's almost a 2-to-1 ratio of male attendees to female attendees in summer school," said Liz Lyons, vice principal at Lydiksen Elementary. "We do have a few more males who attend the conditional schools in Pleasanton, but I think it is notable to see that shift between the number of boys that are going after extended school year support."

As a counteraction, staff said that "collaboration with school sites and data collection will take place over the '19-20 school year in an effort to better understand the potential causes and to gain insight into instructional and behavioral support strategies that will interrupt the pattern."

More than 600 high school students "successfully completed" credit recovery or grade replacement courses through a "blended format" of online learning and subject area-credentialed instructors. The average grade for all courses was 76% or a C, according to the report.

Since 2016, 42% of students in grades K-8 were enrolled in summer school for at least two of those four years. Another third were enrolled in three of the past four years, and 15% had attended every single year during that time with the exception of students in the extended school year program.

Students took advantage of the district's 14 enrichment classes this summer such as algebra readiness, graphic design, video production, culinary arts and STEAM courses.

Several areas for improvement that staff will focus on over the coming year include planning to "work with site leadership and intervention specialists to clarify intervention pathways" and "continue to coordinate wrap-around services for our most vulnerable students."

Staff also reported that peer tutoring was "one of the most treasured components of summer school," where high school students applied to be tutors. "They were dutiful and attentive," said staff, who added that "it really was a powerful experience ... to be part of the mainstream classroom" for students who came from alternative education programs.

The intervention summer programs budget was approximately $542,877. Funding came from the PUSD general fund, Local Control and Accountability Plan, Title I, special education, fees and donations.

In other business

The board also received a report Tuesday on the district's unaudited actuals, which included PUSD's actual revenues, expenditures and fund balances for the 2018-19 school year.

Under state law, the district is required to annually submit those statements to both the California Department of Education and the Alameda County Office of Education.

Among the update, the district's general fund ending balance for fiscal year 2018-19 is $26,417,508, according to public documents. Of that total, $11,016,568 is "unassigned/unappropriated" and $4,980,140 is designated "other assignments."

More than $5 million-plus is accounted for legally restricted balances, which are unspent balances of specific types of entitlements such as state categorical funds and local contributions from the Parent Teacher Association and Parent Faculty Club. Another $211,612 consists of revolving cash, prepaid expenditures and stores inventory.

The district's 3% economic uncertainties reserve is currently resting at $5,186,245; their goal is to eventually achieve a 9% reserve. That number could rise to 4.3%, should the trustees direct the district to contribute up to 20% of the unassigned ending balance. For this year, that would add another $2.2 million to the reserve, for a total balance of $7.4 million.

Meanwhile, PUSD's cafeteria fund "continues to be self-sustaining with no contributions from the general fund," while the deferred maintenance fund used about $800,000 in expenditures and the district bond fund had $7.3 million in expenditures The current cost of classroom compensation for the 2018-19 school year is 63.92% of total expenditures.

The board approved the unaudited actuals budget report 3-0. Trustees Joan Laursen and Mark Miller were both absent that evening.

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