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BART police work mandatory overtime to increase visibility, deter crime

BART police and staff will be working an extra day each week as mandatory overtime to discourage crime, transit agency officials said Monday.

The pilot strategy was introduced in August as part of the General Manager's Safety and Security Action Plan in response to concerns over violent crime and fare evasion throughout the system.

Through the added visibility of uniformed police officers and BART staff wearing high-visibility vests, transit officials hope to deter criminal activity in the system and violations of the transit agency's rules.

"We are taking concrete action in direct response to the concerns of our riders," BART General Manager Grace Crunican said Monday in a statement.

"Our riders want to see more employees on the trains and platforms and at the fare gates," Crunican said. "This plan lets us immediately increase employee presence while we work to hire more police officers."

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Starting in July, Crunican is hoping to add 19 positions for police officers to the budget. They've reduced the number of vacant positions for police officers from 41 to 20.

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— Bay City News Service

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BART police work mandatory overtime to increase visibility, deter crime

Uploaded: Tue, Apr 9, 2019, 1:07 pm

BART police and staff will be working an extra day each week as mandatory overtime to discourage crime, transit agency officials said Monday.

The pilot strategy was introduced in August as part of the General Manager's Safety and Security Action Plan in response to concerns over violent crime and fare evasion throughout the system.

Through the added visibility of uniformed police officers and BART staff wearing high-visibility vests, transit officials hope to deter criminal activity in the system and violations of the transit agency's rules.

"We are taking concrete action in direct response to the concerns of our riders," BART General Manager Grace Crunican said Monday in a statement.

"Our riders want to see more employees on the trains and platforms and at the fare gates," Crunican said. "This plan lets us immediately increase employee presence while we work to hire more police officers."

Starting in July, Crunican is hoping to add 19 positions for police officers to the budget. They've reduced the number of vacant positions for police officers from 41 to 20.

— Bay City News Service

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