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2 new courts approved for Pleasanton tennis complex

Council rejects $1-million proposal from Parks and Recreation Commission

The City Council voted 4-1 Tuesday to build two new courts at the Pleasanton Tennis Park at an estimated cost of $600,000, rejecting a recommendation by its Parks and Recreation Commission for a $1-million project.

Only Councilwoman Kathy Narum voted against the council majority, arguing that the more expensive plan would save parking spaces that will be needed in the coming years.

The council's action followed an order by the council Aug. 9 to stop construction of two new courts after residents of nearby homes complained they would be too close to their homes and would take away grass areas the public used.

Construction fences that had already been erected with bulldozers ready for demolition work were quickly removed as the council directed city staff and the Parks and Recreation Commission to look for a better plan

Tuesday, the commission recommended three alternatives, but favored Alt. 3 that would call for two separated courts requiring extensive site preparation work at an estimated cost of $990,000. That plan also would require the removal of 17 trees at the Hopyard Road and Valley avenue corner, including at least three "heritage" trees.

The council majority said no and chose the commission's less expensive Alternative 1 plan. Although it will require demolishing 15 parking spaces, fewer trees will be chopped down and the two new courts will be close to the tennis park's main building. It's also estimated that bids for that proposal could come in closer to the $494,353 bid submitted for the earlier plan that drew neighborhood complaints.

Councilman Jerry Pentin led the opposition to a motion by Councilwoman Karla Brown to approve the more expensive third alternative, which was backed by Narum.

"We're talking about tearing down 17 trees, including three heritage trees, to save 15 parking spaces," Pentin said. "I just can't connect with that proposal. I don't understand that thinking and can't support it at all.

Councilman Arne Olson agreed, saying he could support the more expensive plan if city staff put an $800,000 ceiling on any construction bids.

"I'm worried they (the contractors) will see us coming if we approve this expensive plan," Olson said.

Thorne said that while there's no question that more courts are needed at the tennis complex, the proposal by the Parks and Recreation Commission is too costly.

Tom Murphy, an avid tennis player who has long advocated building more courts in Pleasanton, said the cost for Alternative 3 are just too high.

"I've researched this on the Internet and found that the average cost to build a tennis court ranges from $50,000 to the highest at $100,000," he said.

Murphy also pointed out that Santa Clara University recently completed a tennis complex for $2.5-million that includes nine championship courts, lights, seating for 750, meeting facilities; a hospitality reception area and a main building with lockers and all.

"I urge all of you to take a deep breath before approving this costly plan," Murphy told the council. "Tennis players have waited a long time for more courts to be built. Maybe we can wait a little longer."

With the council's approval of the basic two-court building plan, city staff will now refine the proposal before advertising for construction bids.

Comments

9 people like this
Posted by Karen
a resident of Amador Valley High School
on Dec 8, 2016 at 9:39 am

Karen is a registered user.

Is any one else just a little embarrassed that we spend $800k to $1M for a couple of tennis courts? Especially when the changes wanted by neighbors added somewhere around $300k to the original price tag. I like parks too, but really, didnt the City (taxpayers) just build a multi million dollar Bernal Park with play fields too? Im just asking about our priorities as a community.


4 people like this
Posted by Map
a resident of Del Prado
on Dec 8, 2016 at 5:39 pm

Good luck getting cheaper bids when you admit on this site to basically having a pocketful of money that the city is willing to spend on tennis courts that we don't need. I knew this was coming back to haunt us, at least it's not going to be condos on that site, although it would have saved commuting time for tennis players if they lived right there.


1 person likes this
Posted by Mister Grass
a resident of Birdland
on Dec 8, 2016 at 6:43 pm

If you build these two new courts, they will come. If not, we can play grass ball.


5 people like this
Posted by residents
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Dec 9, 2016 at 8:05 am

Karen, apparently when it comes to sports there is no limit as to how much the city will spend. Now don't ask the city to spend money to time the traffic lights properly. It is not a priority.


3 people like this
Posted by mooseturd
a resident of Pleasanton Valley
on Dec 9, 2016 at 10:01 am

mooseturd is a registered user.

The thing about tennis courts is that they are easily bulldozed to make room for high rise affordable apartments.


3 people like this
Posted by residents
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Dec 9, 2016 at 12:07 pm

But so can football and soccer fields!


Posted by Name hidden
a resident of Pleasanton Meadows

on Dec 9, 2016 at 9:58 pm

Due to repeated violations of our Terms of Use, comments from this poster are automatically removed. Why?


2 people like this
Posted by Karen
a resident of Amador Valley High School
on Dec 12, 2016 at 8:25 am

Karen is a registered user.

Im not sure I understand the comments here. Simply put, nearly $ 1 million dollars is alot for two tennis courts. If there is a big tennis community speaking out for the need for two more courts despite the price, then I have not read about it. I would hope that the demographics and research was done to show tennis will continue to be in demand for many many years given our demographics. Im speaking as a taxpayer.


3 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Dec 12, 2016 at 10:38 am

I agree, how about some basketball courts? Currently, you have Fifth and sixth grade graders getting home from practice at 10pm on school nights because there are not enough basketball courts to practice on. those tennis courts are mostly not fully utilized now.


3 people like this
Posted by FrequentWalkerMiles
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Dec 12, 2016 at 11:36 am

FrequentWalkerMiles is a registered user.

Be careful what you wish for. When I lived in Walnut Creek back in the day the city built some basketball courts down the street, and it got pretty "gritty" pretty quickly. It wasn't unusual for there to be "fracas" from all the "players" who drove from miles around to go there. Summer nights could get quite, "heated". The accompanying parking lot was often used as a meet up place for "transactions" and the city police eventually turned a blind eye to it.




1 person likes this
Posted by Common Sense
a resident of Del Prado
on Dec 13, 2016 at 10:00 am

@FrequentWalkerMiles

Comparing WC to P-town is like comparing apples to oranges. The few times I called PPD to report suspicious activities around the tennis park area, a patrol car responded promptly. Other than a few pot heads and gangster-wannabe from our local high schools, we seldom see much "gritty" actions in P-town, which is why we moved here and not to WC.


1 person likes this
Posted by FrequentWalkerMiles
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Dec 13, 2016 at 12:42 pm

FrequentWalkerMiles is a registered user.

"Comparing WC to P-town is like comparing apples to oranges.... Other than a few pot heads and gangster-wannabe from our local high schools, we seldom see much "gritty" actions in P-town, which is why we moved here and not to WC."

If you have been in the Bay Area long enough, Walnut Creek is a cautionary tale of where Pleasanton can end up in a short while. You know what ruined Walnut Creek? Apartments were built on every available patch of land that was zoned residential.

In fact the newer apartment complexes in Walnut Creek are the worst ones because they are required to have x% of low income housing and with those come the section 8 voucher holders. The grocery stores near where I used live now has a huge sign that says "EBT welcome here".

You think it won't happen here? Stick around.


Like this comment
Posted by Common Sense
a resident of Del Prado
on Dec 13, 2016 at 1:07 pm

@FrequentWalkerMiles

You have no idea what you're talking about. WC is NOT anything like P-town nor is P-town heading toward the same fate as WC. For starter, the demographics in P-town is changing drastically, with families with children moving in by the hoard. WC, on the other hand, has been attracting the younger crowd and singles. Clearly P-town is going down a different path.


1 person likes this
Posted by FrequentWalkerMiles
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Dec 13, 2016 at 1:19 pm

FrequentWalkerMiles is a registered user.

"You have no idea what you're talking about. "

Well then....

"For starter, the demographics in P-town is changing drastically, with families with children moving in by the hoard. "

Right, up to this point all the people in my neighborhood of single family homes are just all singles living there. How did I not see that?

"WC, on the other hand, has been attracting the younger crowd and singles. Clearly P-town is going down a different path."

yep, building large amount of apartments, condos and townhouses in a town with BART will do that. Cause, meet effect. Like I said, stick around a bit.


2 people like this
Posted by Pleasanton Parent
a resident of Pleasanton Meadows
on Dec 15, 2016 at 10:48 pm

Pleasanton Parent is a registered user.

Unfortunately more true than not - basketball courts draw more hoodlums than tennis courts, high density housing does the same vs single family homes. And the rate of building exceeds our ability to assimilate the newcomers to Pleasantons culture and values (ie a whole new apartment complex with all newcomers vs sporadic single family homes embedded in existing neighborhoods)


2 people like this
Posted by Ellen
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Dec 16, 2016 at 1:48 pm

Seriously??? I have lived here for 20 years and Pleasanton is DEFINITELY turning into Walnut Creek. How can anyone not see that? If you are new here you may not see it.......


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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