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NCS may ban aluminum bats at local schools

Mortorium imposed on 10 Marin County schools following head injury to Kentfield pitcher

The North Coast Section of the California Interscholastic Federation may consider banning metal baseball bats when it meets next month in response to the injury of Marin Catholic High School pitcher Gunnar Sandberg, who was hit in the head with a baseball hit by a player using an aluminum bat on March 11.

Thursday, the Marin County Athletic League unanimously approved a moratorium on the use of metal bats at its 10 high schools for the rest of this season. The moratorium also applies to post-season play at the freshman, junior varsity and varsity levels, League Commissioner Susie Woodall said.

Sandberg, a junior from Kentfield, was put in a medically-induced coma until last Friday to alleviate swelling of his brain, and had a brain scan Monday. He remains in critical condition at Marin General Hospital.

Woodall said the NCS, which covers an area between Hayward and the Oregon border, including Pleasanton and the Tri-Valley, will also consider the prohibition of metal bats when it meets next month.

There also is a grass roots movement to provide helmets to pitchers when teams play against schools that continue to use metal bats, Woodall said.

She said that while Marin Catholic High School did not want to push for a permanent ban on metal bats, the 10 high schools in the league voted on the issue at their meeting in Larkspur.

Woodall said the North Coast Section of the California Interscholastic Federation may consider the prohibition of aluminum bats when it meets in April.

The North Coast Section, which includes the Marin County Athletic League, covers an area between Hayward and the Oregon border.

There also is a grass roots movement to provide helmets to pitchers when teams play against schools that continue to use metal bats, Woodall said.

She said Marin Catholic High School did not want to push for a permanent ban on metal bats.

The 10 high schools in the league voted on the issue at their meeting in Larkspur.

Bay City News contributed to this report.

Comments

Like this comment
Posted by Qwerty
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Mar 26, 2010 at 8:27 am


These kids should wear helmets period.


Like this comment
Posted by Cholo
a resident of Livermore
on Mar 26, 2010 at 4:34 pm

Web Link HELMETS.


Like this comment
Posted by steve
a resident of Country Fair
on Mar 26, 2010 at 5:19 pm

Poor kid. I hope he's going to be ok. Wooden bats are dangerous too. There is danger in any sport you play. I don't think banning metal bats is the answer.


Like this comment
Posted by Cholo
a resident of Livermore
on Mar 27, 2010 at 11:27 am

it's possible to make plastic bats that have the punch and only fools think that aluminum is better...


Like this comment
Posted by Arroyo
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Mar 29, 2010 at 8:46 am

Why don't we just do away with baseballs? It makes about as much sense. Helmets are great. Perhaps, all those attending baseball games should wear helmets.

I'm all for making the game safer, but where do you stop? There is inherent danger in everything we do.


Like this comment
Posted by Rick
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Mar 29, 2010 at 9:39 am

I will tell you where you stop. You stop making metal bats so good that eventually they hit a ball 150 mph and when that isn't good enough maybe 200 mph. Wooden bats are not that risky, especially with the catchers wearing throat guards etc. They went to metal to save money.


Like this comment
Posted by Mr. Geeneeyus
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Mar 29, 2010 at 10:09 am

This is where the executives at Nerf need to step in. Just think...

Hockey pucks, baseballs & bats, javelins, shot puts, discuss's & we should probably see if we couldn't make golf balls a little safer too...?

The "helicopter mommies" all need to take a deep breath & let our children grow up in this mean cruel world without being smothered in protective clothing, legal actions & the fear of being sued by someone who accidentally breaks a toenail during a soccer game.


Like this comment
Posted by Arroyo
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Mar 29, 2010 at 1:02 pm

My son almost lost his eye after being hit by a errant WOODEN bat. I doubt it would've been much worse with a metal bat. In fact, he might not have required as many sutures from being hit with a metal bat.

There are dangers in everything we do. But, let's blame the metal bat, blame the league that allowed the metal bats, blame the City for not outlawing metal bats at the parks, and be sure to blame the manufacturer of the bats -- you know, the ones with the deep pockets.

Why do they have to use hard balls, why not use tennis balls, instead? Where does it stop??


Like this comment
Posted by Baseball family
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on May 6, 2010 at 2:41 pm

High School Aluminum Bat Debate

Shame on you high school baseball coaches for not banning aluminum bats for NCS championship games. You need to stroke your ego because your baseball team can have a better season for using aluminum bats instead of wooden bats. If your son suffered a blow from a ball that was hit from an aluminum bat….I bet you would vote to ban them. Bet it would be more personal. Look at the bigger picture, coaches. Let go of you’re egos and focus on the boys and their safely.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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