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Oakland Airport shooting birds to ensure passenger safety

Original post made on Jan 19, 2010

Gulls, cormorants and pelicans have been flocking to a spot near the end of Oakland International Airport's runway recently, prompting the unusual decision to shoot dozens of the birds in the name of passenger safety.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Tuesday, January 19, 2010, 6:57 AM

Comments (6)

Posted by JR, a resident of Golden Eagle
on Jan 19, 2010 at 10:12 am

How about checking what is in the water first before shooting.


Posted by Humanist, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jan 19, 2010 at 11:53 am

I would feel a lot better if there were lookouts and firing squads on the tarmack before every flight. 300 human lives are worth more than 3 birds. Farmers lose farms because of a mouse, Homes for families are stopped because of a weed, decades old family use bike park near Altamont is shut down because of a tiny creek that has been dry for decades...all because of arrogant, selfish, dictator-like, obsessed zealots,...but a planeload of innocent families trying to live normal lives is worth more than a flock or birds. Load, aim, shoot.


Posted by Jerry, a resident of Oak Hill
on Jan 20, 2010 at 2:27 am

Since those "birds" dine on small fish, one doesn't need to be a wildlife biologist to suspect the "food source" at the end of the runway would probably be schools of small fish...

As long as the fish remain there, every "bird" killed will be replaced by another "bird"...

By the way, isn't this the same place our Mayor caught her hawk???


Posted by Lee, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jan 20, 2010 at 7:35 am

Can't the Fish and Game people come up with another plan other than shooting the birds? Yep, the food source must be good there right now to have this many birds hanging out, but are we stewards of the earth and its creatures, or are we exploiters of the earth?


Posted by Qwerty, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jan 20, 2010 at 10:39 am


Some airports use a type of audio "cannon" to scare the birds away. Does Oakland have such a thing? I'm quite certain that some airports on the east coast have used these things successfully.

I'd rather see the birds shot than to have a plane crash with several hundred people on board. However, I do agree that it would be nice to look for other solutions though.


Posted by CA Strikes 2009, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jan 20, 2010 at 2:52 pm

In just the state of CA alone, in 2009 - there were 8,649 airline/bird strike incidents....... involving 99,892 birds.



The elimination of birds from runways is not a new issue. Noise makers, dogs, lighting etc etc have all been used. The birds will be where the birds want to be.


I am happy Oakland took the necessary steps to protect airline passengers. It is a reality and a needed step.

Thanks Oakland Airport


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