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Looking for Homeschooling Resources and Groups in/near Pleasanton

Original post made by Interested in HomeSchooling, Amador Estates, on Oct 6, 2011

I have two children: 4th and 8th graders and am seriously considering homeschooling them. I have an advanced degree and am capable but am not very aware of the homeschooling groups in this area. Hard to know where to start. This would be to start homeschooling them beginning January 2012.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Comments (35)

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Posted by Kathleen Ruegsegger
a resident of Vintage Hills Elementary School
on Oct 6, 2011 at 1:43 pm

Here is the link to the PUSD homeschooling support:
Web Link As I recall, it's a fairly comprehensive program.


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Posted by Interested in HomeSchooling
a resident of Amador Estates
on Oct 6, 2011 at 2:01 pm

Thank you very much, KR, for this information. This is a start. However, I am especially interested to know of resources outside of the PUSD system. They are helpful, but I frankly don't want anything to do with PUSD. And for my 8th grader, I am looking for high school resources -- and groups -- which are beyond the homeschooling resources of PUSD.

Again, sincere thanks.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by Kathleen Ruegsegger
a resident of Vintage Hills Elementary School
on Oct 6, 2011 at 2:34 pm

Google search on homeschooling resources for parents; maybe there is something more helpful here: Web Link Glad to help.


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Posted by lessismore
a resident of Castlewood
on Oct 6, 2011 at 3:18 pm

Great,
Lets add one more kid to the workforce who lacks the required social skill.

We hire a number of new grades each year and we see the same trend. Kids who are home schooled lack the social skills, problem solving skills, and the ability to learn from there mistakes. Mom keeps telling them how great they are and when they hit college and the workforce they are unable to over come the fact they are not the next coming.


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Posted by Kathleen Ruegsegger
a resident of Vintage Hills Elementary School
on Oct 6, 2011 at 3:28 pm

Students who are home schooled have to meet the same requirements, including testing. It would be difficult to argue they are stars if the scores tell a different tale. They also are usually linked to a school for field trips, sports, and social activities. I know a large family that home schooled all their kids; quite successfully.


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Posted by Interested in HomeSchooling
a resident of Amador Estates
on Oct 6, 2011 at 4:14 pm

Dear Lessismore,
Your comment about socialization is a common myth about homeschoolers.

Here is more info, if you are interested and open-minded...

Excerpt below (from Web Link)

Dr. Raymond Moore, author of over 60 books and articles on human development, has done extensive research on homeschooling and socialization. His book, The Hurried Child, should be in every homeschooler's library. "The idea that children need to be around many other youngsters in order to be 'socialized,'" Dr. Moore writes, "is perhaps the most dangerous and extravagant myth in education and child rearing today."

Children often do not respond well to large groups. They become nervous and overexcited by noise and too many people. Learning becomes difficult. Behavioral problems develop. After analyzing over 8,000 early childhood studies, Dr. Moore concluded that, contrary to popular belief, children are best socialized by parents -- not other children.

What kind of socialization occurs when 20 or 30 kids of the same age are placed in a classroom together day after day? Peer pressure is enormous. Kids feel like they need to look and sound and be like everyone else, at the risk of forgetting or never discovering who they really are. This results in rivalry, ridicule, and competition - hardly the environment for healthy socialization.

A homeschooler who interacts with parents and siblings more than with peers displays self-confidence, self-respect, and self-worth. She knows she's a part of a family unit that needs, wants, and depends on her. The result is an independent thinker who isn't influenced by peers and is self-directed in her actions and thoughts.

Do tests bear this out? You bet!

Read more on FamilyEducation: Web Link



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Posted by John
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Oct 6, 2011 at 9:48 pm

We usually hear about home school up through high school, but not so much about home college. I don't know, but with all the alcohol abuse questionable values, etc going on in college and even government colleges costing a fortune, I would think any parent would prefer to keep an eye on there young "adult". Just say'in.


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Posted by Janice
a resident of Mission Park
on Oct 7, 2011 at 8:32 am

Try Google "Outstanding Academic Opportunities" in Livermore.


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Posted by Really! Really!
a resident of Bordeaux Estates
on Oct 7, 2011 at 8:47 am

Give it more consideration. It sounds like you have some problems/frustrations with the district, but pulling them out will rob them of so much. How will you provide science lab experience for your children? How can you adequately provide high school curriculum in five or more subjects? What about school pride and the sense of belonging?
I loved going to a big, public high school and so did my children. No, it's not perfect, but dealing with frustrating teachers, students, and assignments was part of the beneficial experience and prepared them for more of the same in college.
I understand pulling students from districts where the schools are dangerous or underperforming, but that is not the situation in P-town.
Of course, as a parent, your choice is paramount, but make sure you have exhausted ways to make Pleasanton schools work for your children before you bail on the system.
Good luck!


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Posted by PUSD Graduate
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Oct 7, 2011 at 9:30 am

[removed] Pleasanton has some of the best schools in the United States. Good luck doing better than all of the teachers your students will get in school, and think about all of the social skills and interaction that your children will lose.

People like this is why our country has gone down the toilet!


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Posted by Kathleen Ruegsegger
a resident of Vintage Hills Elementary School
on Oct 7, 2011 at 12:05 pm

Graduate, Weren't the traits recommended for the community of character taught to you in PUSD or that having a choice is part of what makes this country great? The inquirer will still have to pay taxes and for whatever costs there are for the family's decision. I don't think this has anything to do with the country heading down the toilet. The US has its fair share of problems, but there aren't many better places on the planet to call home.


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Posted by Amy
a resident of Birdland
on Oct 7, 2011 at 1:52 pm

Interested, I believe you will find what you need by joining the group "tri-valley explorers" or "tve". You will find it on yahoo groups. We belong and have found the members to be very helpful. The group supports all ages and flavors of Homeschooling. Additionally you will find help with California laws and compliance. In my experience, it is the best place to start.

To all the negative commenters, no parent takes the decision to homeschool lightly and snarky comment are not helpful nor do they offer guidance which is what this parent seems to be seeking from her/his community.


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Posted by my 2 cents
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Oct 7, 2011 at 2:17 pm

I can understand your wish to homeschool, even in high school. I have thought of that myself because in PUSD they give way too much homework, many teachers especially in Math do not have a clue and do not prepare students, etc.

But think before you do it. I chose to keep my kids in the public schools and supplement the learning at home, and I help them pick and choose which assignments are OK to miss, which tests are OK not to study too much for, and they have a balanced approach while keeping their good grades.

Homeschooling a high schooler is detrimental for their social development, and you already have an 8th grader. High school may not be the best preparing kids academically, but socially it is what they need if they are to succeed in collge and work.

If in the end you decide to homeschool, please please check the Megan's law database to do your own background check of those involved in the homeschooling group you choose. Public schools are great about keeping registered sex offenders away from kids, but in other groups, and homeschooling is no exception, this often goes unnoticed - a friend of mine found out the hard way that one of the homeschooling people they dealt with was not someone they would choose to be friends with, just by searching the Megan's law database.

Good luck.


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Posted by Mike
a resident of Highland Oaks
on Oct 7, 2011 at 3:58 pm

The proof's in the pudding.

What are the statistics comparing home vs. public schooled kids?

Mike


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Posted by Interested in Homeschooling
a resident of Amador Estates
on Oct 9, 2011 at 10:08 am

Mike,
For those interested, here is a link below that summarizes around 25 different studies ... even including studies by State Departments of Education...that concludes "Homeschooling produces better outcomes than Public Schools."

Web Link


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Posted by John
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Oct 9, 2011 at 11:00 am

It would be good to see comparisons with school districts perceived to have good schools (like Pleasanton), rather than a comparison to average schools.


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Posted by John
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Oct 9, 2011 at 11:01 am

"...while the public school students averaged in the 50th percentile on nationally standardized achievement tests."

Well duh.


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Posted by Really
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Oct 9, 2011 at 4:31 pm

Interested In Homeschooling makes a great point when claiming home schooled children do better- Class size does make a difference!


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Posted by Michelle
a resident of Downtown
on Oct 9, 2011 at 7:59 pm

That is great you are thinking about home schooling your children. Yes, at least in Pleasanton, there is too much homework that is 'busy work' that doesn't prepare a child academically. There are a handful of the teachers that are either disgruntled or do not exactly model social skills that anyone would want their children to imitate. Even a few of these can have a dramatic effect on your children's self-esteem. By home schooling, the great thing is that there are plenty of after school activities in the area to keep your children actively involved in the community.

Good luck!


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Posted by Mike
a resident of Highland Oaks
on Oct 9, 2011 at 9:14 pm

Let me reorient my request:

Of the students accepted to universities such as Harvard, Stanford, UCLA and Cal Berkeley, how many were home schooled?

Mike


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Posted by Michelle
a resident of Downtown
on Oct 9, 2011 at 10:33 pm

Sounds like quite a few, Mike, but really who cares? Sounds like you might be in the teachers union or something and feel threatened by homeschooled children. 5 to 10 homeschoolers apply to Harvard each year, and some get in. The percent that get in is far larger than the percentage that apply from public or private schools and actually are accepted.

"Dakota Root proves it doesn't take a state certified teacher, or a teachers union, or a village to raise a child- it only takes two loving parents who give a damn.
.............
Was all the discipline and sacrifice worth it? A few days ago, Dakota Root achieved her lifelong dream. She was accepted at both Harvard and Stanford. She was also accepted at Columbia, Penn, Brown, Duke, Chicago, Cal-Berkeley, USC and several more of the elite schools in America, an unheard of record for a home-school kid. She actually had the confidence to turn down an offer from the Yale fencing coach before she had gotten her other acceptances. The kid turned down Yale!"

Web Link


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Posted by Mike
a resident of Highland Oaks
on Oct 10, 2011 at 1:23 am

Michelle,

I feel that I asked a reasonable question: what is the percentage of home schooled kids among the students accepted to top schools? Your reply is an attack rather than an answer. Please don't assume that I am everything your momma and the Holy Bible warned you about when I ask for figures rather than anecdotes.

Although I am a teacher, I stopped teaching a full load some time ago to move to greener pastures, the green referring to income. I now limit my teaching load to one course per year at a community college just to stay in the game. The anecdotal information I have suggests that home schooled kids leave home at 18 and take low-paying jobs. Because my information is based only on what I've seen and heard from others, however, I am very much interested in knowing what the actual figures are.

Mike


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Posted by Michelle
a resident of Downtown
on Oct 10, 2011 at 9:35 am

Look online Mike. Home-schooled children would would know how to find the information. "Home-schoolers bring certain skills – motivation, curiosity, the capacity to be responsible for their education – that high schools don't induce very well, says Jon Reider, Stanford's senior associate director of admissions.

The Wall Street journal indicated that in a recent year of home-schooled applicants that applied, Stanford University accepted 27% of home-schooled applicants. Yale and Harvard Universities were also among the top tier of colleges with the most home school-friendly admission policies, and 20-40 students at Harvard were home-schooled.




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Posted by john
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Oct 10, 2011 at 10:03 am

Michelle,

Do you have any information for parents who are intersted in going for the home college route? My cousins are home schooling, but don't want there kids going away for college or being exposed to any of the so called local colleges. Seems like nothing but a lot of illegal drinking and not much learning.


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Posted by Interested in Homeschooling
a resident of Amador Estates
on Oct 10, 2011 at 10:46 am

John,
Good question.
I would suggest that you check out the various online degree programs. They are getting better every year. Be careful, tho, because there are a number of "faux-online degree" programs tho.

University of Phoenix is a decent program. (No I don't work there either.) And many "brick-and-mortar" colleges also have an online degree option too...you'll have to do some research here. I believe BYU, Indiana University, MIT, Stanford have a strong online presence...at least for high school I know.

Good luck.


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Posted by Mike
a resident of Highland Oaks
on Oct 10, 2011 at 3:40 pm

Michelle,

Again with the attitude. I asked for information. If you had such information, you could have provided it. Instead you chose to respond with an attack, which of course indicates a hostile attitude toward questions. Then, you take another swipe by implying that if I were home schooled, then I would not need to ask the question in the first place.

If your unreferenced information is correct, I would say the argument for public schooling wins the day. Thirty percent of the students gained admission based on home schooling while 60% were accepted from public schools. Therefore, the public schools, despite the many horrible disadvantages implied by Mr. Root, provide a significantly higher chance of getting into a school that matters. Let me know when the figure gets closer to 50% for 1st-tier schools.

Thanks for helping me to clarify the issue.

Mike


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Posted by Michelle
a resident of Downtown
on Oct 10, 2011 at 3:48 pm

You seem to be an avid supporter of public schools, chastising me for providing information that you 'asked for,' where you seem to be in an agenda to promote the public schools. This thread is about homeschooling. The person who started it was merely asking about homeschooling resources.

Top universities accept excellent students who are home-schooled, are from U.S. private schools, from U.S. public schools and from international public and private schools.

If you want to start a cheerleading thread on why public schools are so great, why not start a new thread? Then address if U.S. public schools are doing such a good job, then why do they consistently rate lower than schools in other countries?


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Posted by Mike
a resident of Highland Oaks
on Oct 10, 2011 at 4:39 pm

Michelle,

I have no allegiance to either system. I am simply curious to know which, if either, is more effective, or conversely, if either is markedly worse than the other; and I feel that statistics are much more helpful than anecdotal information.

The information you have provided indicates that public schools do a better job at getting students into top-tier schools than home schooling does.

Now, perhaps it would be helpful to explore why public schools are more successful or, conversely, why home schooling is less successful at getting kids into our nation's best schools. Doing so might lead to improvements that would benefit those who prefer home schooling by making it more effective.

Mike


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Posted by Michelle
a resident of Downtown
on Oct 10, 2011 at 4:47 pm

Actually, homeschooled students do better on tests, outperforming public school students by 30 to 37 percentile points, thus this is why they have a better chance of getting into college than public school students.


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Posted by Mike
a resident of Highland Oaks
on Oct 10, 2011 at 4:57 pm

Michelle,

Yet your information on university acceptance makes it clear that home schooled kids represent the minority rate. How would we explain higher pre-college test performance producing fewer college admissions?

Mike




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Posted by Michelle
a resident of Downtown
on Oct 10, 2011 at 5:27 pm

There is a higher admission rate for home schooled children applying to college than those who apply from other educational avenues.

The minority rate of those actually attending college reflects the fact that in the general population, far fewer children are home schooled than those that attend public school (or drop out all together because public school has many children drop out before graduation -- don't ask me what percentage, because the schools do not track that).

Because there is a smaller proportion of the overall population that is home schooled compared to those that attend public school, they make up less of an overall proportion of those actually attending and enrolling college.

Statistics 101 would help you understand this. I'm sure the local colleges have a course.


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Posted by Mike
a resident of Highland Oaks
on Oct 10, 2011 at 7:03 pm

Michelle,

"Statistics 101 would help you understand this. I'm sure the local colleges have a course."

As is often the case with individuals who follow up statements with gratuitous swipes at other posters, you have made the most elementary mistake a student of statistics can make.

Mike


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Posted by Gina Channell-Allen
president of the Pleasanton Weekly
on Oct 10, 2011 at 8:43 pm

Gina Channell-Allen is a registered user.

This thread is way off the original topic and is becoming a nothing more than "gratuitous swipes at other posters," to quote Mike.

Let's stop the sniping and get back to the conversation or call it a day with this thread.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by Michelle
a resident of Downtown
on Oct 10, 2011 at 9:47 pm

This weblink gives links to multiple resources for families in Alameda County and the Bay Area about homeschooling.

Web Link


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Posted by Interested in Homeschooling
a resident of Amador Estates
on Oct 11, 2011 at 9:10 am

Outstanding link, Michelle! This is exactly what I have been looking for regarding homeschooling groups in the Tri-Valley area!

I have been talking to several parents about the benefits of homeschooling vs. government schools and am encouraged in the momentum and interest of these parents.

For the benefit of the children and young adults, homeschooling if done right with quality resources, can make a huge positive difference vs. failed government schooling.

Thank you very much again.


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