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Four school districts in Santa Clara County and three districts in San Mateo County are seeking parcel taxes

Original post made by Parent Voting Yes on E on Apr 10, 2011

Pleasanton is not the only school district seeking help to finance schools with the California budget issue.

PARCEL TAXES
Four school districts in Santa Clara County and three districts in San Mateo County are seeking parcel taxes in mail-only elections; ballots are due May 3. They require two-thirds vote to pass.

Santa Clara County

Measure A -- Los Gatos-Saratoga Joint Union High School District, six years, $49.
Measure B -- Sunnyvale School District, seven years, $59.
Measure C -- Cupertino Union School District, six years, $125.
Measure E -- Los Altos School District, six years, $193.

San Mateo County

Measure A -- San Carlos School District, extension, eight years, $110.60
Measure B -- Ravenswood City School District, extend current $98 for seven years and add new seven-year $98 tax
Measure C -- Jefferson Union High School District, four years, $96

Web Link

Comments (11)

Posted by optimistic mom, a resident of Amador Valley High School
on Apr 11, 2011 at 7:06 am

Many districts in the surrounding area already have parcel taxes in place -- between 2001 and 2009, EdSource reports that 66 school districts in the nine counties closest to San Francisco had parcel taxes.

Web Link

San Ramon's parcel tax of $144 was passed in 2009 and is 7 years in duration.

Livermore's parcel tax is $138, was renewed in 2008, and is 5 years in duration.

Dublin's parcel tax is $96, was passed in 2008, and is 5 years in duration.

Fremont's parcel tax is $53, was passed in 2010, and is 5 years in duration.

Walnut Creek's parcel tax is $82, was renewed in 2009, and is permanent.


Posted by Question, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Apr 11, 2011 at 9:18 am

This is Cupertino's second tax. In 2009, they passed a parcel tax for 125 dollars, and it will run concurrently for two years with the new parcel tax they are trying to approve.

On another note, the vote is not confidential. I just got my ballot over the weekend, and you have to sign the envelope and your name is on it. My neighbor was concerned, so I called the registrar of voters on his behalf. I asked if people could drop their ballot at the registrar of voters, they said no because they will start opening them 11 days before the election day. I said what about people willing to drive their ballots 11 days before the election, can they open the signed/named envelope in front of you after giving proper id (driver's license), but then put their ballot in a box where the rest of the opened ballots are so that no one can see how they voted? They said no.

I do not understand why not. When we vote at a polling place, we first sign to get our ballot but once the ballot is filled, you either drop it inside a box or put it through a scanron (without people finding out how you voted)

Anyone knows why the mail in ballot does not allow the confidential vote?


Posted by optimistic mom, a resident of Amador Valley High School
on Apr 11, 2011 at 9:58 am

Please see my note on the other thread about how confidential voting is ensured with vote-by-mail ballots.


Posted by Question, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Apr 11, 2011 at 10:34 am

Thank you, optimistic mom. Your explanation makes sense and it is a lot better than what the people at the Alameda County Registrar of Voters say.


Posted by Optimistic Dad, a resident of Foothill High School
on Apr 11, 2011 at 10:54 pm

Thank you for the link with the surrounding cities parcel tax data. I have been searching for that with little luck. I hope that Pleasanton joins its neighbors in protecting one of its most valuable assets - our schools. And therefore our property values and the quality of life in our community.


Posted by optimistic mom, a resident of Amador Valley High School
on Apr 12, 2011 at 7:36 am

I agree -- thanks to the Del Prado parent Voting Yes on E for providing the list of other parcel taxes currently on the ballot!

It's important for voters to understand that Pleasanton is not the only school district coping with the repeated cuts to education coming out of Sacramento. Local funding measures are part of the solution to this problem.


Posted by checking, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Apr 12, 2011 at 9:21 am

More important that which district are receiving parcel taxes, you have to look at how much money the district receive from the state, per student. This is called the Revenue Limit. You can also look at Total Revenue. All of this information is available (per student) on ed data website at www.ed-data.k12.ca.us . They allow you to compare the districts. Below are the numbers from their website for the district listed at the top of this thread. The latest data they have is for the 2009-10 school year.

Dublin: Revenue Limit: $5,812, Total Revenue $7,870
Fremont: Revenue Limit: $5,029, Total Revenue $8,083
Pleasanton: Revenue Limit: $5,513, Total Revenue $9,842
San Ramon: Revenue Limit: $4,983, Total Revenue $7,809
Walnut Creek: Revenue Limit: $4,794, Total Revenue $7,334

So except for Dublin, Pleasanton receives more per student from the State. Comparing us and San Ramon, we receive $530 more per student from the State.

For Total Revenue, Pleasanton is WAY ABOVE the others. Comparing us to San Ramon we are $2,033 per student more (and this includes a parcel tax San Ramon already receives). Comparing us to Dublin (which has a higher State Revenue Limit) we are $1972 per student higher.

So without the parcel tax, we already enjoy a significant amount of more funding. With this much extra money coming in, we should not be having financial problems compared to the other districts.



Posted by comment, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Apr 12, 2011 at 12:18 pm

San Ramon has increased what they are getting in the 2010-2011 school year, so your numbers are out of date. Even so, cutting down to their level isn't what Pleasanton should be doing. We should be looking to make our schools even better.


Posted by curious, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Apr 12, 2011 at 2:04 pm

"We should be looking to make our schools even better."

Yes, but there are many ways of doing that. Money on it's own without a plan won't help. Making careful long term plans, setting clear priorities and goals and communicating these effectively with the community will.

We aren't even being told what the priorities are. We don't know what the parcel tax will save if it passes and there is a long list of cuts to choose from. There is more talk about the "wellness" policy than CSR at board meetings and I know which of these more parents are talking about.


Posted by Robert, a resident of another community
on Apr 15, 2011 at 8:12 pm

Measure C is unfair and wrong. Why do Cupertino teachers think we, the people, have "extra" money?

I'm voting NO

Web Link


Posted by Robert, a resident of another community
on Apr 24, 2011 at 9:19 am

An Easter Sermon, about Parcel Taxes

Web Link


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