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Is religion a hobby?

Original post made by Curious on Nov 10, 2011

When are we as a society going to wake up and treat religion the way it should be treated? It is a hobby, plain and simple, just like stamp collecting, bowling, or bird watching. It is not necessary for sustaining life like food, water, or shelter, it is something some choose to pursue in their spare time. Why do we continue to give those that participate in this hobby tax breaks, special rights, and the bully pulpit to speak out on issues ranging from abortion to evolution?

Why do we give churches tax exempt status and donations to those churches can be taken as deductions against income tax? To be fair, my local bowling alley should also be tax exempt and my bowling fees should be tax deductible. The church goer and the bowler are both simply participating in their chosen hobby, but the church goer gets a tax break. Seems pretty unfair to me.

Religion is a hobby. Participate if you so choose, but don't ask for special treatment because you do, don't believe you are some protected class because you do, and for dog's sake, don't expect me to listen to your religious inspired opinions anymore than those of my neighbor who bowls in the 50 and over Divorced Teamsters league at the local alley.[

Comments (1)

Posted by Observer, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Nov 11, 2011 at 10:01 am

It's called 'faith', not scientifically proven for any of the many religions. An observer would likely view all religions pretty similar...started centuries ago to explain away the pain of losing a loved one...going to a better place (which for a child can make them want to go join them). Each have equally irrational, illogical, superstitions and practices. It is sickening to listen to today's hypocritical, mean, religious bigots. ridiculing one religion over their own, with different but equally absurd beliefs and practices.
Most were started in unenlightened times by illiterate peoples to
explain away things they did not understand, one is not superior
over another, some just 'think' they are. Yet, these same believers
find excuses to overlook evil and criminal behavior of their own in order to excuse and overlook abuses within their own, yet they think they are special. We should not subsidize this mentality. This is America and many of our founders were Deists, agnostics, Quakers, believers in a God, but not any denomination. Specifically, there were to be no religious requirements for serving in any office in
U S.
In 1960, the catholic issue was huge and many thought that would keep John Kennedy from being elected. Ironic, that group of bigots now try to impose restrictions on others. No official documents reference any 'denomination'.

You might also substitute 'superstitions' or 'personal beliefs' for faith. This is America and you can believe anything you want, and I'll defend your right to 'believe'. However, that
does not mean I should subsidize related activities. Most private institutions are not tax exempt.


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