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Dublin bicyclist killed in collision with car

Original post made on Jun 28, 2009

An adult bicyclist, believed to be in his 30s, was killed in a collision with a vehicle in Dublin late yesterday, California Highway Patrol Officer Jeff Serena reported.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Saturday, June 27, 2009, 7:39 AM

Comments (34)

Posted by Natalie Bianco, a resident of San Ramon
on Jun 28, 2009 at 11:03 am

I was in the mist of this accident about 2 min behind, I live off of Camino Tassajara on Highland...these accidents are happening to often and the bicyclist need to stop riding on the dangerous roads...there is no room for bike lanes, let alone even wide enough for cars to drive on!!! I myself have almost had several accidents because the bicyclist take over the road and cars have to slow to dangerous limits while vehicles from other direction on blind turns cannot see the cars or bicycles!! The bicyclist ride very wide in the roads sometimes taking over the whole lane, with no courtesy to the cars (there is not pull out areas for cars to be able to pass). These roads have become major commute roads because of the traffic on the 580/680 freeways. I am very sad for the bicyclist but equally as sad for the driver of the car. Bicyclist on Camino Tassajara and many of the other two lane roads are very dangerous let alone on a blind curve at 5:10pm commute time.




Posted by Anon., a resident of another community
on Jun 28, 2009 at 2:10 pm

Share the road, Natalie. Slow down for cyclists. It's a fairly simple concept.


Posted by Mike, a resident of another community
on Jun 28, 2009 at 2:56 pm

Natalie

Slow down and stop being so selfish. I know the victim and his wife and young children. We are all in too much of a hurry. SLow down and think about others


Posted by Julie, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jun 28, 2009 at 3:51 pm

Julie is a registered user.

My condolences to the cyclist's family.

I agree that we should exercise care for cyclists. I don't agree that we should be expected to drive behind them on a regular road. It's not always about being selfish or wanting to go "fast". If you have to drive well below the speed limit you create a hazard and besides, it's not fair to have to go extremely slowly on a road or street built for cars. How would you feel if you were driving on a road with a speed limit of 45 mph and a car in front of you was going at 10 or so mph. I think most of us would go crazy.


Posted by Debora, a resident of San Ramon
on Jun 28, 2009 at 9:53 pm

I was also minutes behind this accident and am devastated by what I saw and really there is no right answer for this incident. We all have to be aware of our surroundings and I do believe that they should put in bike lanes to insure the safety of all bikers and drivers. The side is gravel and that is no place for bikes or cars so before they start developing more out there someone should consider the safety issues. I will say it is a beautiful place to take a ride on a bike but maybe 25 years ago but not today in 2009. I do not know where this biker was coming or going to but there are so many other beautiful places to ride and stay safe especially considering his responsibility of a wife and children. So sad!


Posted by Limerick, a resident of Birdland
on Jun 29, 2009 at 8:17 am

When it boild down to a bike, or motorcycle versus a car or truck, remember this simple verse ... rules to live by:



Here comes Jonathon White, who died defending his right ...

He was right, dead right, but he was just as dead as if he were wrong.


Let us know if there'll be a fund set-up for the cyclists family, they need our help.


Posted by john, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jun 29, 2009 at 8:20 am

Have to agree that some roads are just too dangerous for safe biking.
Couple that with militant bicyclists who insist on riding down the middle of the road and others, 2 and three abreast, chattering away,
oblivious to cars coming up from behind(share the road applies only to cars apparently) and you have a sad and predictable consequence


Posted by John, a resident of Downtown
on Jun 29, 2009 at 9:06 am

And what about moms with strollers? They take forever to get out my way!!! Seriously, the attitude that arrogant cyclists deserve what they get is sick. "they hog the lane!" No they ride to stay safe. Riding on the edge is an invitation to arrogant drivers- don't slow down, just brush the stupid hippy into the ditch. Driving is a sickness in this country & far too many die from it. At least 1 fatality a day, & we call them accidents. Sick


Posted by john, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jun 29, 2009 at 9:33 am

grow up John


Posted by Eric, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jun 29, 2009 at 10:01 am

I'm a frequent cyclist in Pleasanton, Dublin and San Ramon. Riding at the edge of the road, especially on a road like Camino Tassajara, is an invitation to be driven off the road. I, like nearly every bicyclist I know, ride defensively and with care, and have never seen anyone who could be described as a 'militant cyclist' because we know we're always the loser in a collision with a car. The attitude expressed by some of the comments, suggesting that bicyclists are a nuisance, is truly a sad reflection of a self-centered culture where *I* am more important than anyone else.

Please let us know if there's a fund set up for the cyclist's family


Posted by So sad, a resident of Livermore
on Jun 29, 2009 at 10:02 am

Read and educate yourself of the law. Bikes have same right to be on the road. If you do not agree change the law. Until then law is to share the road. Both cyclist and motor vehicles need to learn to co-exist. A lot can be avoided if drivers stop multi-tasking (texting, dialing phone, changing radio, spanking their kids, wiping off mustard from blouse, shaving, plucking unibrows) and looking ahead. Cyclist also need to apply common sense. Stay in a single file and be aware of cars around you. As a cyclist too I encounter cyclist while driving and I'm amazed at the irresponsibility and road etiquette. Lesson for both motor vehicle and cyclist.

Prayer to the families impacted.


Posted by GW, a resident of Livermore
on Jun 29, 2009 at 10:21 am

Natalie,

You are "equally as sad for the driver of the car" who was at fault and is alive as you are for the dead cyclist??? Seems like you hold a low value on life.


Posted by PToWN94566, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jun 29, 2009 at 11:02 am

PToWN94566 is a registered user.

"...cars have to slow to dangerous limits while vehicles from other direction on blind turns cannot see the cars or bicycles."

Shouldn't cars be slowing anyway, if there is turn that harbors a blind spot? If this is the spot I'm thinking on Camino Tassajara, then cars coming both ways need to slow way down. That statement is also somewhat of an oxymoron- slow to dangerous speeds when there is a blind spot. Slowing is being cautious of what's around the bend you can't see. I also agree with So Sad- to many drivers are trying to multitask while they drive. Just the other day I saw some guy driving his large SUV around while playing with drumsticks on his steering wheel.


Posted by mitchell, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jun 29, 2009 at 11:28 am

I know that equality means sharing. I also know the bikers attitude when it comes to cars, because my cousin is a biker and shares his anti-car views with us at dinner. The game of Dare has gone too. Bikers own your fair share of the problem because you just won't give it up. Cars, you just don't acknowledge that the roads are not just for you. Always, always an accident waiting to happen, as it always does, week after week on these same roads. When I was a kid my mom said in an argument between you and the car, the car always win.


Posted by Trevor Tooze, a resident of Livermore
on Jun 29, 2009 at 12:01 pm

I was a Dublin resident for 30 years, and feel very sad for this family for teir loss. It seems to me that many of the writers before me, have made the assumption that this cyclist was "hogging the road". They do not even know that there was any fault on the bereaved cyclists part. This is so typical of may drivers inb this area, when they get behind the wheel of a car, they own the road.


Posted by LH, a resident of San Ramon
on Jun 29, 2009 at 12:20 pm

As others have mentioned, bikes are vehicles and ARE allowed access to the road just as much as cars. Cyclists don't want to be on dangerous roads anymore than the cars want them to be. Unfortunately, when riding it is impossible to only stay on roads with wide bike lanes or even bike lanes at all. Take Bollinger for example… it used to be a 2 lane road with a bike lane heading up the hill from Alcosta and then towards Windemere. Over the last year that bike lane was replaced by a third lane for cars. As a cyclist I will take up more room than a car would like me to when there is no bike lane or shoulder. I want to force the car to go around. Otherwise, there are too many drivers who feel that they can stay in the lane with me while going around. I'm not doing this to be a "militant cyclist"; I'm doing it to be more safe – not less. Remember posted speed limits are only for clear, dry, light traffic conditions. The speed limit is always a safe speed for the conditions up to the posted limit. If there is a bike that causes you to slow to 15 mph until you can safely pass, then that is how fast you are REQUIRED to drive.


Posted by mitchell, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jun 29, 2009 at 1:02 pm

@LH "I want to force the car to go around."

Boy, did you just make my point about biker attitude. You cannot force a car to go around you. That's a game of chicken. 1 out of 100 times you lose, unfortunately you lose your life. I know bikers want to have it their way. They deserve the right of way because of morality, ethics, the technicalities of the law. Yeah, keep showing everyone whose the boss, and, sadly, the car wins every time.


Posted by LH, a resident of San Ramon
on Jun 29, 2009 at 2:13 pm

Mitchell - you clearly are not a cyclist. You have no idea how many drivers feel that a car and a bike can fit in 1 lane. While it's possible, it's not safe. There is no room for error on either part.

You seem to think that bikers are trying to show "who the boss is". That's not true. They want to be safe. Spend some time on a bike and you'd understand.

"Bikers own your fair share of the problem because you just won't give it up" - what is the "it" you are referring to? Having equal access to the road? What is your solution?


Posted by MO, a resident of Birdland
on Jun 29, 2009 at 4:06 pm

I was not aware of this tragic accident until this afternoon when a Co-Worker shared the electronic version of the Report via the Pleasanton Weekly.

First and Foremost, my heart goes out to the Family and Friends of the Deceased, any loss is a tragedy. My heart also hurts for the Driver of the Automobile that hit the Cyclist as well as the other driver involved in this terrible accident.

I challenge everyone who has posted a message to start from the top and read to the bottom and "listen" to all of the messages that have been written – there is so much accusation and animosity as well as a sense of entitlement by some of the authors - Unfortunately a common theme reflecting our society today ~

I highly doubt when the driver of the car placed her key in the ignition that Friday afternoon had the intention of taking someone's life and forever changing the lives of many including her own.

Bottom-line, there was an accident. The only people who know what really happened are the driver of the vehicle that hit the cyclist and God.

I hope that we can all learn from this horrific accident and remember that life is precious and as humans we are immune to tragedy effecting us - be grateful for what you have and respect others even though we may not share the same philosophies.


Posted by MO, a resident of Birdland
on Jun 29, 2009 at 4:12 pm

Re-Post - there were a few errors in my last comment..............

I challenge everyone who has posted a message to start from the top and read to the bottom and "listen" to all of the messages that have been written – there is so much accusation and animosity as well as a sense of entitlement by some of the authors - Unfortunately a common theme reflecting our society today ~

I highly doubt when the driver of the car placed her key in the ignition that Friday afternoon she had the intention of taking someone's life and forever changing the lives of many others including her own.

Bottom-line, there was an accident. The only people who know what really happened are the driver of the vehicle that hit the cyclist, possibly the cyclist and God.

I hope that we can all learn from this horrific accident and remember that life is precious and as humans we are not immune to tragedy effecting us - be grateful for what you have and respect others even though they may not share the same philosophies.


Posted by J, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jun 29, 2009 at 4:59 pm

Very sad to see someone who was trying to stay healthy and active die in such an unfortunate way. I am curious what has become of the lady who was driving, and what the next step will be in her being punished for taking another persons life (even if an accident). In her panic (unless I misread the story) she also hit another vehicle head-on, all while dragging the cyclist under her car. So this single driver killed one person and caused serious injury to another. At least she didn't flee the scene of the accident, as the lady who struck the pedestrian in Dublin did


Posted by Deb, a resident of Bridle Creek
on Jun 29, 2009 at 5:54 pm

Car don't look for bikes, that why they hit them.

Open closed trails to the bikes so they have places to ride.

Make stiff JAIL penalties for cars that hit bikes.

If you don't ride a bike, you may not know that bikes have to drive like cars in traffic.

If you're a person who is in such a hurry to pass a bike, ask yourself if you've made time to get a will or invest in a college funds for your kids.

Slow down for bikes and be a role model for other drivers to show how to pass a bike safely.


Posted by Julie, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jun 29, 2009 at 9:09 pm

Julie is a registered user.

The lady likely could not flee the scene of the accident - the article says that she sustained severe injuries as well.

We don't know who was at fault or if the driver will be punished. Sadly the cyclist paid the ultimate price. It's a tragedy for all involved.


Posted by resident, a resident of Downtown
on Jun 30, 2009 at 12:33 am

What keeps coming out here is that bikers hate drivers and think they can "force" drivers to give way. Many drivers dislike having bikers on the roads. Seems to me that common sense is missing here. Bikers will never win and should show some smarts about riding where there is visibility and room, not insisting that they are entitled to be anywhere at anytime. I am real tired of watching bikers blow through red lights whether or not there are cars coming on the cross street. You want the right to be on the roads then you have the obligation to obey all of the rules. A driver who hits anyone should be punished if, and only if, they broke the law in causing the accident. If the biker broke the law then the biker needs to be punished. If drivers and bikers followed the laws, including not speeding, no cell yapping, stopping for signs and lights, there would be far fewer of these accidents ever happening.


Posted by mitchell, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jun 30, 2009 at 8:09 am

@ LH "What is your solution?"

My solution is (1) to get rid of the "attitude" of the bikers. Yes, a bikers flips off my wife as he runs a red light. Bikers scream at my kid for no reason for slowly passing them on a hill. He said he was trying to be cautious but the bikers kept screaming. (2) and car drivers need to understand the law. This is the first time I have remotely become aware that bikers should not yield the right away. (3) public awareness for a two sided problem, not just cars being the bad guys. For example, what should I do if I run into a bad biker who is essentially ruining it for the rest of the bikers. I guess I'm saying awareness is the solution. Incidentally, I don't want to become a biker to know how you feel, it's just too dangerous a risk to prove a point.


Posted by DL, a resident of Danville
on Jun 30, 2009 at 10:40 pm

It's a melt down between too many using on the off roads during peak hours, some not paying attention, some in a hurry, some taking ownership, and/or causing hazards on the roads. Sometimes it's unfortunately "being at the wrong place at the wrong time."

If we all took some time to be more patient in our daily lives, there would be a decrease in bad accidents.

My condolences goes out to the family and friends of the bicyclist.


Posted by Steve, a resident of Foothill High School
on Jul 6, 2009 at 10:02 pm

That's why I chose to mountain bike.


Posted by BLT, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jul 7, 2009 at 9:10 am

Deb,

"Car don't look for bikes, that why they hit them."

Cars don't have eyes, people have to do the looking. ;)

"Open closed trails to the bikes so they have places to ride."

This doesn't address the issue of cyclists legally using the roads they pay taxes to use.


"Make stiff JAIL penalties for cars that hit bikes."

Cars make poor inmates, they leak oil, need to have their tires inflated periodically... ;)


"If you're a person who is in such a hurry to pass a bike, ask yourself if you've made time to get a will or invest in a college funds for your kids."

Why the concern for the car driver? The cyclist should have life insurance and a will, if she/he might die and leave a family behind.


"Slow down for bikes and be a role model for other drivers to show how to pass a bike safely."

Amen!


Posted by BLT, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jul 7, 2009 at 9:16 am

I heard from a trusted friend who was driving behind the woman who caused the accident that she was talking on her cell phone when she hit the cyclist and didn't know what she hit as she crossed over and hit the oncoming car, dragging the cyclist over 100 ft. The cyclist was a tri-athlete and a financial markets executive.

Drive for the conditions, slow down around blind turns, stay behind bikes until it's safe to pass - yes, it might take 60 seconds, so what.

PW, please do a follow up on this story.


Posted by james, a resident of Pleasanton Meadows
on Jul 8, 2009 at 11:49 am

there was a story in another paper recently about a cyclist who attacked a car. rhe driver of the car, a woman, had pulled off of the expressway onto the saftey of the shoulder to take an urgent call on her cell phone. the cyclist, using the shoulder as a bicycle lane on the expressway became so angry at the driver for impeding him that he stopped riding and started pounding her car with his fists, denting the roof and hood. of course she ended her call to dial 911, and even though he claimed he had the right of way and was only trying to get her attention, he was arrested and booked on charges of felony assault and making terrorist threats.

i mentioned the driver's gender because i don't think for a second that this biking clown would have had the courage to pound on a male driver's car. there are militant, arrogant, stupid cyclists too. the point is that we all need to bring courtesy back to driving\cycling to avoid incidents like this, or worse.


Posted by Pleasanton resident, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jul 15, 2009 at 7:13 pm

Things I learned from this thread:

1) Cyclists have the right to go anywhere they want, whenever, no matter the conditions, and always have the rightaway, in every situation
2) Share the Road means bicycles have priority
3) Any accidents between cars and bicycles are automatically the car driver's fault no matter what happened...every time
4) In short, someone died and left cyclists as kings of the road

Observations I've had while driving:
A) People who drive cars tend to be morons too much of the time
B) Rules of the road such as stop signs and red lights only apply to cars, bicyclists can do whatever they want (in addition to #1 above)

All of the above combine to form a nasty environment on the roads. Unfortunately, the reality is no amount of political correctness and posturing about who has more moral authority can change the laws of physics. High speed differentials results in accidents, something traffic engineers have known for decades.

What to do about it? Cycle on safer roads, during times when there is less traffic? Or is that not an option? As for drivers, they are bad enough as it is...pay attention, not speed especially on these back roads? And cyclists, lose the attitude. Realize alot of drivers are just out to head to work and back, you know, engaging in worthwhile economic activity (while you're doing a leisure activity) and are NOT out to kill you.


Posted by Eric, a resident of Bridle Creek
on Jul 15, 2009 at 11:10 pm

My condolences to the driver as well as the mad who was hit and their families!

"Bikes have same right to be on the road. If you do not agree change the law. Until then law is to share the road. Both cyclist and motor vehicles need to learn to co-exist."

This is not necessarily true. The bicycles go well below the posted speed limit and thus are in violation of the vehicle code. Motorists are sharing the road with those that choose to break the law. Going to slow for a posted speed limit is a danger and a violation.

There was a tragedy and I am sad for the families yes, but there seems to be an arrogance among these bike riders and an entitlement mentality.


Posted by Former Cyclist, a resident of Livermore
on Aug 7, 2009 at 5:28 pm

There is a common misunderstanding: while bicycles are vehicles under the Motor Vehicle Code, they do not in fact have all of the rights that motor vehicles have; specifically, they are required to ride "as far to the right as possible", which means that a cyclist riding well out into the traffic lane to "claim the road" is in clear violation of the law. If two or more cyclists are riding abreast, only the one(s) along the right edge of the roadway are legal; any others are in violation.

Also, there are specific requirements with respect to bicycle lanes: the most important and most often violated (by cyclists) is that if the lane is present, they are required to use it. The only exceptions are for legitimate obstacles (the pavement being smoother outside the lane is clearly not one of them), to pass a pedestrian or another cyclist (but only if it is safe to do so) and when riding at the prevailing traffic speed. It will be interesting to see what happens the first time there is a head-on collision because a driver crossed the double yellow line to avoid a collision with a group of bicyclists riding two or three abreast---adjacent to a bicycle lane!

I, for one, have had the experience of pointing out to a coworker that pretending to be in the Tour de France was no justification for violating the law, and his response was along the lines of "Well, we have to practice..." When he actually read the vehicle code, his attitude changed somewhat.


Posted by M. Green, a resident of Amador Estates
on Jun 10, 2013 at 1:50 pm

"Lost COntrol"? She's an IDIOT and shouldn't be in the road!


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