http://pleasantonweekly.com/print/story/print/2011/05/06/heritage-association-honors-st-mary-street-home


Pleasanton Weekly

News - May 6, 2011

Heritage Association honors St. Mary Street home

Five heritage homes to open for museum's tour

The Pleasanton Heritage Association has announced that Don and Noel Anger are the recipients of the second annual Pleasanton Architectural Heritage Award for their home on St. Mary Street in Pleasanton's historic downtown district. Last year the honor went to Teri and John Banholzer a few houses up the street.

The Anger home was originally built in 1921 for the Hansen family that owned the Hansen-Gieger Dairy. It was purchased by the Angers in 1965 and has been lovingly restored and maintained, from the vintage wooden windows to the carport.

The carport was considered so emblematic of California that World War II soldiers would pose for photos by its orange tree. The old tennis court behind the home was home base for Don Anger, who is a retired Amador tennis coach Don Anger's home base; it also served as the training ground for their children, Jenny and Matt, who went on to become a National tennis champion.

The association gives its Heritage Award to homeowners who preserve and restore existing heritage homes or build new homes that are true to the historic character of Pleasanton's downtown historic district. The award will be presented at noon, Saturday, May 21, at the Angers' home, 541 St. Mary St.

The home will be one of five heritage homes open to the public for the Museum on Main Heritage Home Tour from 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sunday, May 22. Participants will begin at the Museum On Main, 603 Main St., and receive a booklet for the self-guided tour. Cost is $25; call 462-2766.

Comments

Posted by downtowner, a resident of Downtown
on May 12, 2011 at 3:58 pm

That is indeed a lovely home and I have always admired it. But, who are these folks who decide those "...who preserve and restore existing heritage homes or build new homes that are true to the historic character of Pleasanton's downtown historic district?"

And, what the heck is the "historic character" of downtown? There are so many different types of homes in the downtown area. Historic is old, but does old equal historic?

Any opinions out there?