News


BART riders potentially exposed to measles

Infected UC Berkeley student rode trains Feb. 4-7

BART riders may have been exposed to measles by a UC Berkeley student who traveled on trains in Contra Costa and Alameda counties last week while infected with the disease.

Representatives of Contra Costa Health Services and BART warned that anyone who used the transit system between Tuesday, Feb. 4 and Friday, Feb. 7 may have been exposed to the measles virus. They are being urged to be on the lookout for possible symptoms, which usually begin between one to three weeks after exposure.

While the UC Berkeley student only traveled between the El Cerrito del Norte station and the downtown Berkeley station, the virus is transmitted through the air and can live for up to two hours, potentially exposing people traveling on different train lines at different times,health officials said.

Riders who exhibit symptoms of measles, including a blotchy rash, fever, cough, runny nose, red and watery eyes, tiny white spots with bluish-white centers found inside the mouth or experience malaise are urged to seek medical attention immediately, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The disease usually starts with a rash developing on the face and neck accompanied by a fever.

The rash then spreads down the body and usually lasts five or six days. The infected person is usually contagious for several days before and after the rash appears, according to the CDC.

Contra Costa Health Services, the California Department of Public Health, UC Berkeley and Berkeley Public Health are investigating the student's movements and working to notify people who came into close contact.

BART uses industrial-strength disinfectant to clean its trains at the end of the each day, according to BART officials.

The student was not vaccinated and was likely infected with the disease during a recent trip abroad, health officials said. Before being diagnosed, the student spent time in the Berkeley community, attended classes on the UC Berkeley campus and used BART on several days.

No other measles infections related to this case have been identified, health officials said.

Those vaccinated or who have had measles in the past are unlikely to catch the disease, according to the CDC. However, those who have not been vaccinated are very likely to catch measles if they are exposed to the virus.

"Measles is a serious, highly contagious disease," said Dr. Janet Berreman, health officer for the city of Berkeley. "It spreads through the air, when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Fortunately, the measles vaccine is highly effective in preventing infection."

According to the CDC, among children infected with measles, up to one in 20 will develop pneumonia, one out of 1,000 will develop encephalitis and one or two out of 1,000 will die. Measles can also cause pregnant women to have a miscarriage or give birth prematurely.

Contra Costa County residents can call county health services (925) 313-6740 or 211 and Berkeley residents can call (510) 981-5300 for more information. Additional information is also available at online.

— Bay City News Service

Comments

Posted by Meatballs, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 15, 2014 at 10:50 am

This is what we get, with the ever-increasing number of meatballs that believe in the word-on-the-street and young-wives tales rather than science. There is absolutely no excuse for the vast majority not getting the measles vaccine, and those that don't get it are a real menace to society. Even more of a menace are the meatballs that don't get the whooping cough and polio vaccines.


Posted by Right, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 15, 2014 at 8:04 pm

(Post removed by Pleasanton Weekly Online staff for containing unverified or personal information.)


Posted by Al Longman, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 15, 2014 at 8:27 pm

(Post removed by Pleasanton Weekly Online staff as irrelevant to this thread.)


Posted by Right, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 16, 2014 at 8:04 am

Al 'long man'? Certainly not....I have to disappoint you Al, but I don't play on the team you're referring to. But it is interesting that your post brings to mind another preventable disease that may be consuming your brain.
Had you actually looked into the story a little more, you'd realize my post was accurate. The diseased individual that is the subject of this story, just returned from the Phillipines and was not vaccinated. Save your righteous indignation for your buddies in the Castro.


Posted by Al Longman, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 16, 2014 at 9:31 am

Yep, we just need to close down our entire tourism industry, and by all means, keep students from any and every "3rd works country" outside our colleges and universities.

You're pretty funny, Right. Lots of phobia going on with you, phobia of this, phobia of that, phobia of this kind of people, phobia of that. Sorry to shove this further down your throat, but you need to be reminded that your comments are nothing more than you being afraid of yourself.


Posted by Sam, a resident of Oak Hill
on Feb 16, 2014 at 9:35 am

Right wrote: "it's more likely this student is an import from a disease infested 3rd works country. This is what the left never considers when they shove 'diversity' down everyone's throats."

You never miss a chance to jump to conclusions in your rush to expose your stupid bigotry, do you? You even admit that you don't know where this student is from, but that doesn't stop you from using this event to bash 'diversity'. FYI, there are many western Europeans who are not vaccinated against measles due to philosophical or religions grounds, and in fact there was an outbreak of measles in Wales, UK last year. Yeah, we don't want all those Welsh coming over to our country and infecting us with their measles, do we?


Posted by Cholo Pololo Mololo, a resident of Livermore
on Feb 16, 2014 at 2:44 pm

There are millions of Americans who have NEVER BEEN VACCINATED.

I suggest folks reconsider getting vaccinated so that they and their families and friends remain safe.

I agree that there are posters on this blog who luuuuuuuve to bash LGBT and people of color.

sad...

Still reconsider having your family vaccinated.


Posted by Right, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 16, 2014 at 8:23 pm

Well, cholo, you finally managed to make a valid point...vaccinations would have prevented this carrier from infecting himself and others.
Sam and al, you can make all the excuses you want, but your liberal, anything goes attitudes (people not getting vaccinated for philosophical or religious excuses) are endangering others, consuming resources at hospitals, doctors offices, even BART.
You can continue to portray your self righteous attitudes...no one can cure stupid...however, your ignorance is endangering your neighbors and friends, if you have any.


Posted by Sam, a resident of Oak Hill
on Feb 16, 2014 at 10:10 pm

@Right
Yeah, anti-vaccination people like Michele Bachmann are real liberal all right. Feel free to write her a letter condemning her views on vaccinations. That would be a better use of your time than any further posts here.


Posted by john, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 17, 2014 at 10:09 am

"Europeans who are not vaccinated against measles due to philosophical or religions grounds"

Sam, I hope the only point you're making here is that people who don't get vaccinated aren't just people from developing countries. There really aren't any legitimate "philosophical or religions grounds" for not getting vaccinated. I hope you don't think that there are.


Posted by Sam, a resident of Oak Hill
on Feb 17, 2014 at 11:27 am

John wrote: "There really aren't any legitimate "philosophical or religions grounds" for not getting vaccinated. I hope you don't think that there are."

I don't have any position on that. As a practical matter, if the number of people not getting vaccinated for philosophical or religious reasons is sufficiently small, it shouldn't affect the "herd immunity" of the population much.


Posted by john, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 17, 2014 at 12:06 pm

"...is sufficiently small".

It's already not "sufficiently small". It is already causing problems.


Posted by Sam, a resident of Oak Hill
on Feb 17, 2014 at 1:22 pm

John wrote : "It's already not "sufficiently small". It is already causing problems."

I don't think that the claim of your first sentence has been established. People decline to get vaccines for other reasons than because of sincere philosophical or religious grounds. Some people are just lazy about it.


Posted by john, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 17, 2014 at 4:02 pm

"I don't think that the claim of your first sentence has been established."

It has. Google it.

Please define "sincere philosophical". There is an ignorant group of celebrities pushing a pseudo scientific anti-vaccine agenda that some people are following. It is already causing problems.


Posted by Sam, a resident of Oak Hill
on Feb 17, 2014 at 4:37 pm

@John
I simply meant people who made a deliberate decision to not get vaccinated due to some concern of theirs as opposed to those who simply didn't want to take the time or trouble to get vaccinated. My feeling is that the numbers of people who just don't want to take the time and trouble greatly outnumber those who made a deliberate decision not to get vaccinated, but I don't know and I could be wrong.

I myself have some concerns about the thimerosal preservative used in some vaccines because it contains a small amount of mercury. I have no problems taking a vaccine using thimerosal myself because I figure I'm old enough that the tiny amount of mercury compounds doesn't make any difference. But for my small daughter I prefer that she take an oral inhaling flu vaccine. Maybe I'm being too cautious and maybe I'll change my mind if I ever get around to looking into the issues surrounding thimerosal more closely, though.


Posted by john, a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Feb 17, 2014 at 5:02 pm

Web Link

"Thimerosal has been removed from or reduced to trace amounts in all vaccines routinely recommended for children 6 years of age and younger, with the exception of inactivated influenza vaccine"

"But for my small daughter I prefer that she take an oral inhaling flu vaccine."

Of course, that's a good choice.

"Thimerosal is a mercury-containing preservative used in some vaccines and other products since the 1930's. There is no convincing evidence of harm caused by the low doses of thimerosal in vaccines, except for minor reactions like redness and swelling at the injection site. However, in July 1999, the Public Health Service agencies, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and vaccine manufacturers agreed that thimerosal should be reduced or eliminated in vaccines as a precautionary measure."

Web Link


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